Transcending the silos: Moving beyond borrowers and lenders in resource sharing
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Transcending the silos: Moving beyond borrowers and lenders in resource sharing

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Poster presented by David Ketchum at the 2014 ILLiad International Conference, Virginia Beach, Virginia, March 18-20, 2014.

Poster presented by David Ketchum at the 2014 ILLiad International Conference, Virginia Beach, Virginia, March 18-20, 2014.

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Transcending the silos: Moving beyond borrowers and lenders in resource sharing Transcending the silos: Moving beyond borrowers and lenders in resource sharing Presentation Transcript

  • Transcending the Silos: Moving Beyond Borrowers and Lenders in Resource Sharing David Ketchum Resource Sharing Librarian dketchum@uoregon.edu Example Self Assessment 41% 100% 50% 45% 82% 50% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 Median Example Rotating Task Schedule 41% 100% 50% 45% 82% 50% 95% 100% 91% 68% 95% 95% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 Median  Median level of competence/proficiency for the unit (Before) = 50%  Median level of competence/proficiency for the unit (After) = 95%  Combined increase in individual levels of competence/proficiency = 131% Individual & Median Levels of Competence/Proficiency Before & Ten Months After Cross-Training “I feel like I have more to offer the patrons and my coworkers in terms of being able to field patron questions, help out when coworkers are out of the office, and help student workers with training and troubleshooting.” “I enjoy the variety of work. It keeps things fresh and interesting to have a wider range of tasks than before.” “I love understanding the whole process or lifecycle of borrowing and lending and learning more about document delivery too. I don’t know how I got by before, knowing only my little piece of the whole picture.” “I really enjoy helping student workers, patrons, and other libraries more effectively – it gives me a sense of satisfaction and success.” Measured outcomes • Self-assessed skill level for each task, 10 months after cross-training • Quantified individual and median levels of proficiency • Looked for unintended outcomes (example: borrowing request delay time) • Solicited feedback from staff Process for cross-training • Identified currently-assigned tasks • Self-assessed skill levels for each task • Quantified individual and median levels of proficiency • Organized group training sessions • Encouraged everyone to attend • Covered multiple tasks/processes in each session • Provided standard and “problem” examples • Updated process/procedure manual Implemented rotating task schedule • Ensures ongoing proficiency • Change tasks each day; weekly schedule can change less frequently • Focus on tasks everyone should understand • Maintain some “specialized” tasks • Assign tasks based on time commitment to better balance workloads Supplemented task schedule with task priority list • Serves as guideline only • Remain flexible Individual & Median Levels of Competence/Proficiency Before Cross-Training Example Task Priority List 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Average Processing Delay Time (Minutes)
  • Transcending the Silos: Moving Beyond Borrowers and Lenders in Resource Sharing Poster presented by David Ketchum 2014 ILLiad International Conference, Virginia Beach, Virginia, March 18-20, 2014 When I arrived at the University of Oregon Libraries in February 2012 as the new Resource Sharing Librarian, there was a clear distinction between “Lenders” and “Borrowers” in ILL. Beginning in October 2012, the ILL team began cross-training across all ILL-related tasks and working from a rotating task schedule. These efforts have helped the ILL unit transcended the legacy model of distinct Lenders and Borrowers, greatly enhanced competence and efficiency across the department, and helped foster a collaborative learning environment. February 2012: Traditional “Borrowers and Lenders” model 4.5 FTE processing 90K transactions per year (50K Lending/40K Borrowing) Each task was assigned to a specific individual; some had designated backups October 2012: Began cross-training Some Reasons for cross-training Transcend processing silos Provide more complete understanding of the entire ILL process Recognize priorities Fill in for others more easily Provide better customer service Offer more comprehensive support for and oversight of student assistants Diversify task assignments and learn new skills Collaborate and team-build Enhance flexibility Support UO Libraries’ Strategic Directions, i.e. Improve the User Experience, Become a Learning Organization Balance workload Encourage development and succession planning Process for cross-training Identified currently-assigned tasks Self-assessed skill levels for each task Quantified individual and median levels of proficiency Organized group training sessions Encouraged everyone to attend Covered multiple tasks/processes in each session Provided standard and “problem” examples Updated process/procedure manual Implemented rotating task schedule Ensures ongoing proficiency Change tasks each day; weekly schedule can change less frequently Focus on tasks everyone should understand Maintain some “specialized” tasks Assign tasks based on time commitment to better balance workloads Supplemented task schedule with task priority list Serves as guideline only Remain flexible Measured outcomes Self-assessed skill level for each task, 10 months after cross-training Quantified individual and median levels of proficiency Looked for unintended outcomes (example: borrowing request delay time) Solicited feedback from staff