2008 Annual Report Wasso Hospital, Ngorongoro, Tanzania
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

2008 Annual Report Wasso Hospital, Ngorongoro, Tanzania

on

  • 3,197 views

2008 Annual Report of Wasso Hospital: Ngorongoro's District Designated Hospital. ...

2008 Annual Report of Wasso Hospital: Ngorongoro's District Designated Hospital.

In this report you will find some background information of our hospital and a summery of our achievements and challenges in 2008.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,197
Views on SlideShare
3,191
Embed Views
6

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0

3 Embeds 6

http://www.techgig.com 4
http://www.lmodules.com 1
http://115.112.206.131 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    2008 Annual Report Wasso Hospital, Ngorongoro, Tanzania 2008 Annual Report Wasso Hospital, Ngorongoro, Tanzania Document Transcript

    •           Contributing to a better health status of the people, by improving the quality of the health care services and making them accessible, acceptable and affordable       Annual Report 2008        Wasso District Designated Hospital  Postal:  PO Box 42, Loliondo  Fax:  +255 ­ 27 ­ 253 049  Tel:  +255 ­ 27 ­ 253 190  Email:  mo­ic@wasso­hospital.org  Website:   www.wasso­hospital.org                  Prepared by Dr Christian van Rij, accordingly to CSSC template 2009 
    •       Contents  EXECUTIVE SUMMERY ........................................................................................................................................ 3  BACKGROUND ................................................................................................................................................... 4  HISTORICAL DATA OF FACILITY ...........................................................................................................................................    4 AREA OF OPERATION .......................................................................................................................................................    5 POPULATION AND DEMOGRAPHY OF THE AREA OF COVERAGE ..................................................................................................    6 SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS ..................................................................................................................................... 7  FINANCIAL ANALYSIS .......................................................................................................................................................    7 STAFFING  .....................................................................................................................................................................    . 7 INFRASTRUCTURE AND ACCESSIBILITY .................................................................................................................................    8 MAJOR BURDEN OF DISEASES ............................................................................................................................................    9 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT  .......................................................................................................................  1  . 1 STRATEGIES ......................................................................................................................................................  2  1 ACHIEVEMENTS AND CONSTRAINTS ..................................................................................................................................  3  1 WAY FORWARD ...........................................................................................................................................................  4  1 STAFF ESTABLISHMENT .....................................................................................................................................  6  1 STAFF ON TRAINING ......................................................................................................................................................  6  1 SOCIAL WELFARE .........................................................................................................................................................  7  1 SUMMARY OF SERVICES GIVEN .........................................................................................................................  8  1 MEDICAL SERVICES .......................................................................................................................................................  8  1 PARAMEDICAL SERVICES ................................................................................................................................................  0  2 SUPPORTIVE SERVICES ...................................................................................................................................................  1  2 SATELLITE SITE: DIGODIGO DISPENSARY ............................................................................................................  4  2 EPILOGUE AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .............................................................................................................  5  2 ANNEX 1: DISEASE STATISTICS ...........................................................................................................................  7  2 ANNEX 2: MAP NGORONGORO DISTRICT ...........................................................................................................  8  2 ANNEX 3: NGORONGORO DIVISIONS, WARDS AND POPULATION ......................................................................  9  2 ANNEX 4: INCOMING AND OUTGOING STAFF IN 2008  .......................................................................................  0  . 3 ANNEX 5: COMMUNITIES SERVED WITH OUTREACHES ......................................................................................  2  3 2 of 32  Page  
    •   Executive Summery  Wasso Hospital is a District Designated Hospital. The remote location is making our operation quite  difficult as it gives logistic problems. Due to this we also have higher running costs and it makes it  also more difficult to attract good staff. The patients we are serving are among the poorest of the  country, which limits us in making a financial balance with patient fees for the costs not covered by  governmental sources.   Wasso Hospital Key Data  2007  2008   Outpatients  16,589  16,951 Although 2008 was a challenging year  for Wasso Hospital, we feel blessed  Admissions  2,316  3,094 that we managed to overcome these  Death / Admission Ratio  0.032  0.021 difficulties. In the medical field we  Deliveries  523  605 continued with our different projects,  Perinatal Mortality / Delivery Ratio  0.048  0.031 like the outreaches and the Care and Treatment Clinic for people living with HIV/Aids. Although we  faced a shortage of medical officers at our site, we are happy to announce that the quality of care  remained good or improved in all major areas. We did not have complaints for malpractice and the  ratio of death per admission dropped with one third. Although we had an increase of 16% of the  amount of deliveries, we did not had any maternal death and our perinatal mortality ratio dropped  with 34%.   As a reflection of good medical practice, we saw the number of patients rise slightly in our  outpatient department and significantly in our inpatient department. The hospital also managed to  gain a good name at Dutch universities making them decide to send student doctors for electives to  our hospital, which boosted an atmosphere of education at our hospital.     Administratively we also made a lot of progress. We managed to fill the gap in our management  team with the arrival of a new administrator in June. The management became more transparent by  clarifying the basis of management decisions, and by proposing an organogram to the staff so that  lines of communication within the hospital became clear. Finally we also managed to improve our  financial transparency to donors and to gain further trust from by undertaking all efforts to make a  cost reductions in our not medically very relevant expenditure. Together with a good medical  performance, this triggered our donors to assist us more, which  enabled us to make large reductions in our debts.     Digodigo Dispensary is run as a satellite of Wasso Hospital. It is  located 68 kilometer from Wasso Hospital. Staff shortages en drugs  shortages remain a difficult issue for this site. We have the ambition  to make several improvements to the site in the coming year to  facilitate its upgrading to a Health Centre with a Service Agreement  3 of 32  with the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW). But even  though these problems exist, Digodigo Dispensary still remained the dispensary with the highest  utilization in the district.  Page  
    •   Background  Historical data of facility  Dr Herbert Watschinger studied medicine in the early ninety  fifties. After graduating from medical school he studied  theology to enable him to also give spiritual care. After he  became a parish priest in Linz, Austria, he made a large trip  to East Africa in 1960. As a result of this trip he met Sister  Guida Reichhör who insisted that he would come to Loliondo  to start a hospital among the Maasai. Up to that moment  there were – besides traditional practices – no health care  services available in the district. Dr Watschinger accepted  this challenging mission and started to mobilize the Austrian  community to assist him in the establishment of a hospital  for the Maasai. Although doctor Watschinger was living in  the parish in the border village Loliondo, he chose to establish the hospital about 8 kilometers more  to the south at Wasso. He decided to build it next to a natural water source where the pastoralistic  Maasai were coming to give water to their cattle (and this is also why the hospital has also been  acting as the protector of water sources). On 2 September 1964 the hospital was opened.     From Wasso Hospital Dr Watschinger was also serving the Watemi in Sale Division. But sometimes  the Palalet river was making transport between Sale and Wasso, 68 kilometers apart, impossible.  Therefore the Watemi requested Dr Watschinger for assistance to build a maternity clinic there. Dr  Watschinger agreed to do that and in 1973 the Digodigo Clinic was opened.     Dr Watschingers ambition did not stop there as he realized that the people in the very south of the  district were still poorly served. For long time he had been serving the population around Endulen by  performing flight clinics to that site, but in February 1976 he managed  to open his third health care facility in the district, Endulen Hospital.     Until the death of Dr Watschinger, financial resources were mainly  provided by private and church related organizations in Austria. After  this the Austrian government took over the majority (90%) of the  funding for the hospital. Austrovieh, later called Austroproject, was  entrusted to act as Austrian government project holder for the three  Watschinger hospitals.     4 of 32  In 1995 Wasso Hospital has been officially designated as the district  hospital. This designation is based on an agreement between the  Tanzanian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) and the  Page Catholic Archdiocese of Arusha, who is the legal owner of Wasso   
    •   Hospital. This is entitling the hospital to receive government grants for staff, drugs and some other  charges. Since that time the percentage wise financial contribution of the Tanzanian government to  the hospital has increased. From the year 2000 the Austrian government started to cut down their  contributions to the hospital as the Austrian government wanted to focus on other countries for  their development aid. From 2005 onwards, the support from the Austrian government completely  ceased, which caused large financial problems at the facilities.     In the first decade of the 21st centenary the hospital  continued grew quickly in correspondence with the  increase of the population of the district. This is for  Number of Beds example reflected in the raise of the amount of beds  200 available at the hospital. The most recent increase in the  100 number of beds was made after moving into the three  new wards in the summer of 2007. These wards were  0 build in the preceding years with financial assistance from  1990 1997 2002 2007 the Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates Mr. Mallala  Al Ameri.   Area of operation  Wasso Hospital is the district designated hospital of Ngorongoro district which measures 14,036 km2.  Ngorongoro is the most isolated district of the Arusha Region. Just south of the Ngorongoro Crater,  the district is bordered with Karatu district. In the west it is bordered with Serengeti National park, in  the north with Kenya and in the east with (the salty) Lake Natron in the Rift Valley. Administratively  the district is divided into 3 divisions, 14 wards and 37 registered villages (see annex two and three  for more details).    Wasso hospital is located in the so called Rift Area, 20 km from the Kenyan border at an altitude of  2,005 meters; in between the Serengeti steppe in the west and the Rift escarpment / mountain  ranges in the east. Wasso is located 6 km south of the district headquarters Loliondo.     Wasso Hospital Catchment Area describes the area  where we are supposed to provide a health care  to. According to government resolution, our  catchment area consists of 30,002 people in 2008  (supposed to reflect a part of the Orgosorok  Ward). In reality Wasso Hospital is the leading  service provider in a much larger area, which we  call Service Area. This consists of the Loliondo and  Sale Divisions and a large area in Kenya (see annex  5 of 32  2). Other health care facilities in the area are  mentioned in annex three, but besides Endulen  Hospital and Arash and Digodigo Dispensary, there  Page quantitative contribution is not large.    
    •   Population and demography of the area of coverage  Projected from the 2002 national census, in 2008 Ngorongoro District was populated by 186,464  people divided over roughly 32 thousand households. This means on average 13 people per square  kilometre. The annual growth was estimated at 4.5% (roughly twice as high as country average).     There is no data known about the age distribution and life expectancy of our population. Also key  indicators for the health care are not know on district level. As reference we shall therefore mention  the Tanzanian averages (data from WHO statistics from 2007):  Age structure:  <14 years: 43%; 15‐64 years: 54.1%; > 65 years: 2.9%. The median age is 18  years. Total life expectancy at birth is 50.5 years for males and for female 53.3 years.   The total fertility rate is 4.5 children born/woman. An estimated 43% of all births is attended  by skilled personnel. The maternal death rate is reported to be 578 per 100,000 but  estimated by WHO at 950 per 100,000. The under‐5 mortality rate in rural areas is 138 per  1000 live newborns.  We expect that the age distribution is even lower in our district, and likewise also the life  expectancy. The fertility rate is likely higher, the non‐medically supervised deliveries is certainly  higher, and therefore the maternal death rate will also likely be higher. Also the under five mortality  rate is expected to be higher.   The main and indigenous inhabitants of the district are the Maasai (±80%) and the Watemi (also  called Sonjos). The Maasai are mainly pastoralists who depend on cattle herding. The Watemi  sustain themselves mainly with agricultural activities and are living in Sonjo valley (the area around  Digodigo Dispensary). Both groups are therefore extremely vulnerable to periods of long drought. In  more recent times there is a big influx of job looking non‐indigenous ethnic groups to the area  around Wasso and Loliondo. The Maasai and Watemi have quite distinct cultural differences.  Language problems are still a serious problem in our district where especially people with a Maasai  background have often difficulties expressing themselves in Swahili. Also the districts literacy rate is  estimated to be far below the countries average.    On average, the people in our district have little financial means. The Gross National Income (GNI)  per capita in Ngorongoro district was according to the 1998 Arusha Region Socio‐Economic Profile  one third of the countries average.  Extrapolating this ratio to 2008 would  mean an average income in Ngorongoro  of around 317 euro per capita per year.  Financial reserves are within the Maasai  population mainly invested in cattle.  Periods of drought in which many cattle  will die will therefore directly influence  6 of 32  their means for living.     Page  
    •   Situational Analysis  Financial Analysis  In the past years, the MOHSW has been increasing its contribution to our district hospital, this is  done in form of payment of the salaries of staff, direct contributions to MSD, Basket Fund allocations  and some other charges. On the other hand government regulations are stipulating that the majority  of our in‐ and outpatients should be treated for free. In addition the hospital is also carrying out  several CHMT tasks like the outreaches and a school health program into two of the three divisions  of our district.     As the Basket Fund allocation is mainly used to compensate for the costs of the outreaches, and cost  sharing income (patient fees) are not adequate to cover for all patient related expenses, it is difficult  have the remaining (fixed and flexible) costs covered. Especially worth mentioning are the costs for  the staff allowances, which are not covered by the government, but are higher than the total patient  fee income. Also finding financial sources to cover for special projects – like for example the building  of staff quarters – is difficult. So for these issues we are mainly depending on external donors. The  fact that such external donors were not present in 2005 and 2006 resulted in huge debts, which  were still largely present in 2008.     During 2008 we managed to improve the financial status of the hospital significantly. We reduced  our costs by improving financial regulations and habits. On the other hand we managed to increase  our cost sharing income by providing a higher quantity and quality of our services. Furthermore we  managed to secure improved budgets for vertical programs run by the hospital. Finally two NGO’s,  Watschinger Foundation and CORDAID, have played a significant role by giving large financial  support in an integrated way to the hospital. Their donations should be seen as a recognition of our  improved transparency and performance in 2008.   Staffing  Attracting and retaining staff at a remote location like Wasso remains difficult. We have taken up  this task by not letting our staff down on our promises, among which is most notably the correct and  timely payment of salaries and allowances. Furthermore we have come with other incentives to  increase the team spirit, the atmosphere of friendship, and the identification of oneself with the  objectives of the hospital. We therefore invested in sport activities, in celebrations, shown our care  to our staff, by discussing our mission during staff meetings, and by giving small tokens of  appreciations like Christmas presents. Although the actual costs are not that high, these investments  have really shown its value.   7 of 32    Staff incentives for new staff also involves giving salary top ups and providing the staff with a staff  house. Unfortunately financial recourses for salary top ups were very limited. Also the number of  Page staff houses available are limited. It would be good if we could start new building project in the   
    •   coming year so that we can continue providing staff with this incentive. Additional donors must  therefore be sought.   In spring 2008, the district authorities started to recruit staff from our Hospital. Initially this was said  to be done in order to retain them working at Wasso Hospital. Later, we regretfully learned that  most of the staff would be reallocated anyway. From the perspective of our staff, the most  important reason to join the government contract was that their pension scheme is much more  attractive. It is important that we can achieve a balance in governmental and FBO incentives.     Compared to national standards, the hospital significantly run short of medical staff in several areas.     Since October 2007 there was no administrator present, putting a severe workload on the other  members of the hospital management team. Fortunately a new administrator, Mr  Claude Rieser  who was recommended by the Watschinger Foundation, joined us in June.     After Dr Msechu was not longer allowed to  continue working at Wasso since December  2007, the hospital was left with only two  medical officers for 2008. It was in late  December that a new medical officer would  join the hospital. Dr Frank Liso fortunately  joined us in October 2008 as an AMO to  assist in the huge work. The shortage of  AMO’s would remain 9 according to national  guidelines. In early 2008 we had 8 clinical  officers working with us, of which one was  allocated to Digodigo Dispensary.  Government guidelines stipulate that we would need 14 clinical officers.     Another big shortage was present in the nursing department; more specifically among Nurse  Midwives. The nursing department was usually not larger than 24 nurses (Nurse Officers and  Midwives combined), while this should be accordingly to government regulations 49. Although our  number of nurses remained reasonably stable during the year, it must be mentioned that the  turnover of nurses was quite significant.   Infrastructure and Accessibility  In 2007 several necessary improvements were done to new wards donated to the hospital in 2005  by the Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates. Besides that it made an increase in the number of  beds possible, it also assured that the former wards could be used for other purposes – for example  for the new CTC, for storage and as staff quarters. In 2008 we were also able to move the ICU to its  8 of 32  new location which is more spacious and in connection with the nursing station.     The earthquakes in 2007 and 2008 caused many cracks in our hospital buildings. Slowly (limited by  Page the high costs) we started repairing these cracks in 2008.    
    •     TB ward appeared to be too extensively damaged to be repaired by ourselves. We have been trying  to look for possible solutions with the district authorities. The same applies for the bridge which  gives access to the hospital as it will likely not survive another rain season.     Wasso Hospital is in itself quite well accessible located next to Wasso village, with dirt road  connections to Loliondo and neighboring villages. Accessibility from further locations is difficult for  many due to the limited ways of transport in general in Ngorongoro: no tarmac road is present, dirt  roads are also in poor condition or barely existing and public transport is very limited. Referral  hospitals are at least one full day of traveling by road. Also most of our procurements need to come  from one day traveling far. For emergency transport there is only one ambulance available within  the district. In special cases we have the possibility to ask Flying Medical Service for an evacuation by  flight – though this is very costly. We try to bridge the problem of accessibility by also going on daily  basis with car and flight clinics to these hard to reach communities. Also for the flight clinics we are  depending of the assistance of Flying Medical Services – though they provide this service for free.     Communication within the district is poor, in large area’s radio call is the only means for direct  communication. Fortunately the network coverage for mobile phones is increasing. Landline  telephone is only available in a few limited places. Since 2006 we fortunately have an internet  connection via a satellite – though very costly.   Major burden of diseases  Malaria followed by pneumonia remain the biggest threat to people in our area, especially under  children. They are the number one and two disease in our top ten of illnesses and as the causes of  death. We therefore strongly support the government program on Alu as a free first line drug for  malaria as this is saving many lives. The reason we still see many deaths from these two diseases is  that patient still come very late to our hospital when the disease is already very advanced and  treatment with even second line drugs is then sometimes still too late.     Although malnutrition is only mentioned as the main admitting diagnosis in 40 patients, we do  notice malnutrition is a major complicating factor in patients admitted for other diseases like  pneumonia and burns. We are therefore see it as important to continue with our free patient meals,  although the real solution can only be made on a community level.     In the top ten of deaths, the most noticeable development is the sudden appearance of ARC (Aids  Related Complications) as the number one cause of death among admissions older than five years  (15 death in 2008 compared to 7 in 2007). Possible explanations could be: A) an increase in the  number of patients with ARC (increasing HIV‐epidemic); B) an increase of patients with ARC who are  seeking help (as it is better known that we can currently treat people living with HIV/Aids); C)  9 of 32  previously insufficient recognition of ARC among doctors. Other changes in the top ten lists are not  very significant or are based on different naming of diseases.     Page  
    •   Although the numbers still remain relatively low, we do see a significant increase in diseases which  are associated with older age, like for example cardiovascular diseases. In 2007 total admission for  cardiovascular diseases was 20, but in 2008 it grew to 53.     Please see annex 1 for the top ten diseases for outpatients, inpatients and causes of death.     10 of 32  Page  
    •   Institutional Arrangement  The hospital is part of the Health Department of the Archdiocese of Arusha. The  medical officer in charge is therefore invited as a member to the Archdiocesan  Medical Board in which all Archdiocesan health facilities plus the Regional Medical  Officer are represented. Its meetings are held every quarter of the year.     Underneath the Archdiocesan Medical Board functions the Board of Governors of  the Hospital. Its chairman is the Bishop’s representative; the secretary of the  board is the medical officer in charge. Although the final constitution of the  Hospital Board of Governors is still to be decided by the Archdiocese, other  members are the Archdiocese Health Secretary, the Hospital Administrator and  the District Medical Officer. Its meetings are also quarterly, in advance of the  Archdiocese Medical Board Meetings.     Directly under the Board of Governors functions the Hospital Management Team,  which is responsible for the daily management of the hospital. It is chaired by the  doctor in charge and consists of the head of departments as mentioned in the underneath hospital  organogram. The organogram also reflects which units are under which department.     Once per month (or more when there is an emergency) the Hospital Management Committee is  formed to go through issues which need a broader discussion or consultation with unit leaders from  the hospital. In this team are the Head of the Departments (administration, medical, nursing and  accounting) plus a selective group of unit leaders. Currently this selection consist of the Head of the  Workshop, Head of the PHC department, one representative from the OPD/Doctors, one  representative from pharmacy/laboratory/radiology/ physiotherapy units (also called paramedical  group), and finally the in‐charge of Digodigo Dispensary.         11 of 32  Page  
    •   Strategies  The Mission view of our hospital is that we “exists to fulfill the call of Christ in the healing ministry by  improving the health Status of all, especially those most in need”. Our Vision on how to achieve this  is that we should “undertake all efforts to contribute towards a better health status of the people in  the area, by improving the quality of the health services and by making them accessible, acceptable  and affordable”. For this we have undertaken several strategies to achieve this.     In order to link with especially the poorest communities who will else have difficulties to come to the  hospital, we organize an extensive outreach program. With these outreach program we go to 26  remote communities by car on four weekly basis, and to 11 communities on two weekly basis.  During these outreaches we provide general health care and an extensive mother and child health  program.     At Wasso Hospital we emphasize on good a quality of care. We try to achieve this by having every  working day a morning report where representatives of all medical and paramedical departments  meet to discuss the wellbeing and progress of our patients. During these morning reports we also try  to give continuing education to each other. Also by sending staff to training sessions elsewhere and  by upgrading our staff by sending them to school again, helps us to achieve good quality of care.  Finally, having students among us at the hospital will also create a better atmosphere of continuing  education.    One of the most important ways to make our hospital affordable is by implementing a flat fee  system since 2007. Patient will only pay the fee accordingly to the category they are in, which  reduces the risk of families running huge financial problems due to unexpected high medical costs.  This system has managed to attract more patients who otherwise would not have come to the  hospital. In conjunction with this system we have also set up an poor patient fund where people  who cannot even pay the flat fee rate can apply for assistance.     In order to improve the financial status of the hospital we have also linked with several NGO’s.  Watschinger Foundation and Cordaid have proven to be huge financial donors to the hospitals in an  integrated approach. Another significant NGO is EGPAF who assisted the hospital with large financial  contributions into the vertical program for HIV/Aids care. In order to receive continuing support  from NGO’s it is important that we remain transparent and accountable for all our activities and  spending.     12 of 32  Page  
    •   Achievements and Constraints  In 2008 we have managed to improve the level of care to our  people by on one hand increasing the quantity of care we have  provided to them, and on the other hand by also increasing the  quality of care. The amount of patient served through our  outpatient department has increased with several hundred  patients to almost 17 thousand. We have managed to increase  the number of admissions by one third to 3,094 patients. Also  the amount of institutional deliveries has increased with 80  patients to a total of 605.     Although an increase of patients served can easily turn into a decrease of quality of service given, we  are happy to state that the opposite has happened. We have managed to decrease the amount of  deaths per admission with one third to 1 per 47 admissions instead of 1 per 32 admission in 2007.  We did not have any maternal death in 2008 and the perinatal mortality dropped to 1 per 32  deliveries from 1 per 21 deliveries in 2007.     It remains a difficult to reduce the amount of bed days per admission. This by the fact that many  patients live far from health care facilities. Many times we cannot discharge patients who could be  treated further as outpatients as they simply live too far to come for daily treatment to OPD. The  amount of bed days per admission is also higher  due to the fact that we have many mothers  Bed Days  2008 admitted who are just waiting for safe hospital  Total Number of Bed Days  43,421 delivery (such an admission can sometimes take  Average no of bed days / admission  14 days up to six weeks).     Administratively we have managed to achieve a better level of transparency to our staff. We  achieved this by making the staff better aware of guidelines and values we used as the basis for our  decisions. And we gained trust from our staff by also adhering to the same guidelines and values  when they even would not favor the hospital management. We also improved the information flow  from the lowest to the highest level of management, and vice versa, by establishing a renewed  hospital organogram in which everybody could identify him or herself. Also our archiving practice  has much improved by initiating a special system.     Financially we improved our spending by reducing a lot of unnecessary costs, and making  investments in specific areas. Not budgeted expenses were reduced as much as possible. Also the  budget preparations in itself were improved by making use of a better and more accurate and more  detailed estimations.     13 of 32  The combination of an improved level of care with a more transparent and accountable expenditure  did not only give us more trust from our staff, but also from foreign donors.   Challenges were of course still there in 2008. Administratively we have not yet been able to identify  Page all debts we currently have (especially with staff). The financial burden of unpaid debts was still that   
    •   high that the balance between debit and credit is still negative. The payment of staff expenses and  other investments are still difficult issues. Shortages of medicines also occurred in 2008.     Attracting and retaining key staff also remained a challenge in this remote environment in a country  with a nationwide shortage of medical staff. The high performance we achieved in 2008 must  therefore be recognized as the additional hard work of the people in these units who were  understaffed.   Way Forward  We see it as very important that we continue in 2009 the successful path we have started in 2008.  Transparency and accountability will remain the key for gaining trust with higher organs, external  donors and our own staff. For 2009 it will be good to further clarify at which level the different  responsibilities and tasks situated, which will also reflect the area of authority each entity has.     It will be good to continue with all educational activities so that the level of care will remain high at  our hospital, or even further improve. A closer collaboration in this area is also needed with the  office of the DMO in order for the management to make better strategic decisions for trainings.     In order to gain and retain staff at our site, we see it as crucial that new significant investments are  made for staff quarters. As the hospital does not have the financial resources to make these  investments, an external donor will need to be found for this. It will be good to appoint a project  manager on this issue as quicker results can then be expected.     Continuing to be transparent and accountable to our donors will be essential in the future as donors  are getting more and more critical about how their donations are being utilized. In this contest it is  important that significant investments are made into our accounting department. The currently used  QuickBooks system is not transparent enough to many people. Besides that the current system also  has its security gaps and it is also not easy to keep up to date on a daily basis (especially as only one  person has the ability to enter the data). Plans are already being made to come to a new electronic  Hospital Management Information System (HMIS) which will not be employed by the accountant  only, but hospital wide. In such way tracking of all financial flows, goods and services provided can  be done accurately, with daily information to the management for decision making. It will also be  used to collect medical data in a comparable but quicker and more detailed way as the current  MTUHA reporting books.     We also see the upgrading of Digodigo Dispensary as essential in order to have it run in a sustainable  way. Several investments will need to be undertaken so the facility meets the essential criteria to  become a Health Centre. In the mean time investments will need to be made into the administrative  performance of the dispensary, especially in the area of the procurement of medicine.   14 of 32    Unfortunately we did not have enough proper qualified staff for several units in 2008, but  fortunately we expect several staff to return from school in 2009 who can then assist us to revive  Page these units / services. We for example expect one staff to return as a assistant dental officer and he   
    •   can assist us to have a proper functioning Dental Unit again. Also we expect our first properly  schooled physiotherapist to return to the hospital. With his return we can really boost our services  to patients with locomotor problems. We also expect a social worker to return. He will be working  within the nursing department with the aim to assist patients with social problems, and also to  create linkages between the hospital and the communities we serve. Finally we expect also one  nurse officer to return from school in September.     15 of 32  Page  
    •   Staff Establishment  The management team consisted in 2008 of the following people. Medical Officer in Charge: Dr  Christian van Rij; Administrator (from June onwards): Mr Claude Rieser; Accountant: Mr Joshua  Msigwa; Matron: Mrs Ndeskukurwa Mbise. Besides the above mentioned people we also had the  following people in our administration department.  Secretary: Siwajibu Nzwegema; Office Assistant:  Joseph Parsambei (from September onwards); Cashier: Anna Jeremiah Msuya; Store keeper: Julieth  Mweleka. A vacancy for an accountant assistant was not filled.     Besides the above mentioned Dr Christian van Rij, there was only one other medical officer working  at the hospital, Dr Josephine Kyamakya. Fortunately Dr Frank Liso joined the doctors team in  October as an AMO. During the last weeks of the year, one additional doctor joined us, Dr Timizaeli  Sumunai.     The team of Clinical Officers consisted of 8 doctors of which one was allocated to Digodigo  Dispensary. In September Dr Rohella Kaserian left to school for upgrading. Four other clinical officers  would join government contract: one of them would be reallocated to Malambo, three others would  only remain part time available at the hospital. It is clear that new clinical officers must be recruited  in 2009.     The nursing staff was not at full strength accordingly to government regulations. Excluding Nurse  Assistants, the total amount of nurses should be 49. Our nursing department consisted on average  of about 24 nurses. Another complicating factor within the nursing department was that many  government seconded nurses would only remain for short period in the hospital before being  reallocated to other sites within the district. This complicated plans from the management to make  investments into specific people for specific tasks in the hospital. A better coordination with the  office of the DMO is needed on this.     The paramedical staff was not at full strength in 2008. Especially in the laboratory there was a  shortage after Mr Felix Zelote joined government contract and left the hospital (breaking his  bondage contract).    Please see annex four for a detailed overview of staff who left or joined an archdiocesan contract.   Realize that this list doesn’t reflect the changes that happened with seconded staff.   Staff on Training  16 of 32  Full Name  Education  End Date  Apolonia Cyril Meela  Diploma in Nursing  31‐07‐2010  Charles Julius Kivambe  Assistant in Laboratory Technology  11‐09‐2009  Esther Nelson Besango  B.Sc. Home Economics and Human Nutrition  19‐06‐2010  Page Evance Josephat Mkini  B.Sc. in Physiotherapy  19‐06‐2008   
    •   Faraja Israel Malalika  Certificate in Nursing  07‐31‐2008  Frank  Lisso  Assistant Medical Officer  06‐19‐2008  Jacob Joseph Seyai  Nursing Officer  30‐06‐2011  Joseph Saisa  Laizer  Trained Nurse  31‐07‐2009  Linda Thomas Ndangoya  Diploma in Nursing  19‐06‐2008  Lucas  Toroya  Advanced Diploma Social Worker  01‐08‐2008  Mlejo  Ngurumwa Lembyino  Diploma in Nursing Psychiatry  14‐06‐2010  Sabina James  Kiromo  Diploma in Nursing  11‐06‐2009  Theresia Tarimo  Aloyce  Nursing Officer  10‐09‐2009  Victor Mushi Ndale  Dental Technician / Assistant Dental Officer  01‐09‐2009  Rohela Simon Kaseriani  Bachelor of Medicine & Surgery  01‐01‐2013  Social Welfare  Staff under contract with the Archdiocese make social welfare contract. In 2008 there has been  some staff unrest as there were worries that not all mandatory payments had been paid in the  preceding years. Although it was not difficult for the management to prove that currently payments  were done properly, the administrator it lacked documents with individual staff NSSF summaries of  previous years. A task force was put on the issue and by the end of the year, serious progress had  been made to clear up this issue. The final NSSF summery will be made in 2009.       17 of 32  Page  
    •   Summary of Services Given  Medical Services  Out­patient­department  We can reflect on a good running out patient department (OPD) in 2008.  OPD  2008 Although staff shortages were present, the head of the OPD, dr Humphrey  under five  7,244 Mshana, managed to run it well. We even saw a small increase in our  above five  8,573 patients treated there, reaching almost seventeen thousand patients in  retreatment  1,037 2008. 46% of the patients were under five years old and therefore treated  referrals  97 for free. Furthermore we saw a decrease in the amount of patients we  Total  16,951 had to refer.     The outpatient department consists of a room for the cashier, registration, dental, drug dispensary,  and five doctors rooms. Although this is already a huge improvement compared to the situation in  early 2007, we are still running short in space, especially for the waiting patients.  In­patient­departments  As mentioned before we saw an increase of 34% of our admissions. This gave a very significant  increase in the workload for the nursing staff. It would also challenge our budget as we in our flat fee  system can only regain a small portion of the actual admission costs. But fortunately we managed to  keep the quality of care up to a high level and even managed to achieve a reduction in our patient  mortality.   The following wards have been managed as one unit by Joyce Sinodya: Pediatric (36), ICU(6), TB (32)  and the Private Ward (5). The following wards have been managed as one unit by Cecilia Nkii:  Female (24), Male(20), Antenatal (24), and Labor (11) Ward (consisting of a first‐stage room, a labor  room, and a post‐delivery room). In total we have 155 beds plus 3 first stage beds and 3 delivery  beds.   Theatre  Mrs. Esther Clement has been besides assistant matron also the head of major theatre. In the past  year we have received many compliments from visiting specialist for the quality achieved in that  unit.  In total 224 operations have been performed in major theatre. Caesarian sections are the  leading major operation performed (47 times in 2008), but abdominal and orthopedic surgeries are  also performed at our hospital.     Mrs. Bertha Stephen is besides our most experienced nurse anesthetist also the head of minor  18 of 32  theatre. Minor surgeries, incision and drainages, curettages, fracture reductions and wound  dressings are performed on daily basis. In 2008 4474 procedures were done in minor theatre.   Page  
    •   Specialist Outreach Program  During the past year we were happy that multiple specialist have been willing to come to Wasso to  assist us with patients in need of specialist care. We are also grateful to them that they assisted us  with continuing education program by giving lectures during their visits. In total we have received  the following 10 teams.    Date  Specialty  Via  4‐7 February  Pediatrician  AMREF  21‐24 April  Gynecologist  AMREF  19‐22 May  Ophthalmologist  St. Elizabeth  14‐17 July  Surgeon  AMREF  11‐14 August  Ophthalmologist  St. Elizabeth  22‐25 September  ENT Surgeon  AMREF  27‐30 October  Urologist  AMREF  3‐6 November  Opthalmologist  St. Elizabeth  1‐4 December  Pediatrician  AMREF  13‐17 December  Orthopedic Surgeon  Selian    Aids Control Program  Since February 2006 we have started to provide services to people living with HIV/aids. We were  grateful for the support we received from the NGO EGPAF who supported this vertical program in  many ways.     In 2008 we managed to test 645 people for HIV of which 95 were positive. At the beginning of 2009  we had 161 patients in total enrolled of which 81 were eligible to ARV, 78 were actually taking the  ARVs (of which 3 were under 14 years). We managed to do follow up on most of our patients,  although it remained a difficult task as often we were lacking a car for this purpose. Fortunately, we  expect to receive an additional car from EGPAF in 2009 so that this problem will be solved in the  near future. We hope that another constraint, the lack of enough staff trained on HIV/ART, will also  be solved in 2009.  Dental Unit  The Dental unit showed a decrease of patients served. In 2008 a    2007  2008 total of 365 patients received dental care; most of them needed  Carriers  68  62 extraction as the condition of the teeth was too bad. Unfortunately  Other  433  303 our assistant dental officer had to be discharged in December due  Total  503  365 to integrity problems. Fortunately we expect a new Assistant Dental Officer to come back from  school in 2009.   Mother and Child Health Services  19 of 32  In 2008 we continued giving Maternal and Child Health Services at our hospital. This service consist  of performing medical checks on al pregnant mothers and giving them the required vaccinations. In  2008 1335 mothers were checked during their pregnancy. Also the regular checkups were  Page performed on newborn children, who also received their necessary vaccinations during their first   
    •   years of life. The 2667 BCG vaccines from Wasso outreaches are a good reflection of the high rate of  vaccinations given by this unit. People could also come to this department for advices on family  planning.       Wasso Pregnant mothers seen  1,335 Mothers seen after delivery  1,281 BCG vaccines given to children <1 year  2,667 Children underweight at 9 months  2,7% Outreach Services  The above high numbers for our Mother and Child Health Services were not only achieved within the  hospital compound. Due to the fact that many communities have difficulties reaching our facility, we  have been reaching out to them since the early start of our hospital. We started with visiting the  communities by car clinics. But from 1969 with the help of the Flying Doctor Service, later AMREF,  and from 1983 onwards with Father Pat’s Flying Medical Service, we have became able to also serve  the furthest communities by airplane.     During these outreaches a clinical officer treats general illnesses, a nurse officer and a medical  attendant perform an integrated mother and child health care – where preventive measurements  like vaccinations are the key approaches. If seriously sick patient are met during the outreaches, they  are taken back to the hospital for further treatment.     Currently we are visiting on a 4 weekly basis the 18 sites with our car clinics from Wasso and 7 sites  from Digodigo. With the help of Flying Medical Services, we also provide clinics to 11 of the most  remote locations of our district every 2 weeks. Please see annex 5 for an overview of the 36  communities served with our outreaches.  Paramedical Services  Radiology Unit  In 2008 our radiology department has been performing fine. Our radiologist, Mr. Solomon Ombati  has been taking and developing x‐rays of outstanding quality.  He has also developed himself into a  very able sonographer. Since early 2008 he also started making ECG on patients. The quality of the x‐ ray machine and developer are good; having enough films in stock has appeared to be a difficult task  due to a shortage of funds. The quality of the ultrasound machine is not adequate anymore due to  problems with the probes. As replacing the probes alone is very costly, we should look for a new  ultrasound machine in 2009. In total 1,494 x‐ray pictures have been made 1,033 patients. 1,560  patients received an ultrasound investigations.   20 of 32  Laboratory Unit  The laboratory has set a good performance in 2008 though they have been short of staff and  equipment (especially reagents).  Although the total number of investigations done is not counted,  in the underneath table reflects their performance on key indicators.   Page    
    •   In early 2008 we were screening our own  Investigations  Performed  Abnormal blood donors for transfusion blood. But  Blood slides  9,528  3,211 as there is a window period of false  Stool  2,042  1,243 negative results following a recent  TB Sputum  597  63 infection, we started to collaborate with  Syphilis  398  39 the Blood Bank in Moshi who can  Hemoglobin (<7g/dl)  1,561  740 overcome this window period with  CSF Fluid  22  15 Gram Stain  287  216 sophisticated PCR testing on viral  HIV serology  645  95 DNA/RNA. But transport problems are  Units of blood transfusion  121  1 also with this issue an obstacle.   Pharmacy Unit  The pharmacy unit was in 2008 had difficulties keeping proper stocks as the amount of medicines  allocated to our MSD account reflects only 86 beds, while we have 155 beds at Wasso plus an  extensive outreach program. Additional procurements therefore had to be done, also at private  suppliers as MSD also often lacked certain essential items. The total amount spend on medicines and  medical supplies (including our MSD allocation) is roughly estimated on 120 million shilling for 2008.    Under the leadership of Mr. Roche Nyamhanga, the pharmacy underwent several significant  improvements, especially in the area of proper stock keeping and prescriptions. In the coming year  we will continue with these improvements where we will put special emphasis on proper  prescription and on an electronic ordering and stock keeping system.    Spiritual Services  We were happy that in January 2008 the hospital got strengthened by the arrival of Fr Willibrord  Muemans, a Belgian priest who served many years in Congo. It was very unfortunate that his health  started to trouble him and he therefore had to return to Belgium in September that year. The  spiritual service would continue to be given by the parish priest from Loliondo.   Supportive Services  Administration and Accounting  Administratively 2008 has been a very challenging year, especially as we were without an  administrator since October 2007. Fortunately the management team was strengthened from June  onwards by the arrival of Mr. Claude Rieser as the new administrator.     Within the administration we faced quite some difficulties as the organization of documents were  previously organized not properly so it was difficult to find specific documents (as for example  mentioned above with the issue of NSSF documents, but also when it came to the breakdown of the  debts we had with our staff).  We therefore started to go through all old documents and organize  21 of 32  them with a bookkeeping hierarchy. Also new documents were ordered in the same manner. By the  end of 2008 we had also made serious progress in electronizing all current documents by scanning  them, which makes them easily accessible and searchable.   Page    
    •   A new challenge was also brought to the administration department when the MOHSW made a  significant change in the way salaries would be paid: the hospital would no longer receive a monthly  batch payment which was based on the staff status on a set point in June.  It was the intention that  instead of that monthly changes would be send to the MOHSW and they would make the direct  payment to the individual bank account of the employees after deducting their NSSF contributions.  This would appear to be a difficult task as the infrastructure at the MOHSW was not ready for this  huge task.    As we recognized that the proper collection and availability of data is essential for many  management decisions, we started to consider to start a hospital wide computer used Hospital  Management Information System (HMIS). We started to link with the Evangelical Lutheran Church of  Tanzania (ELCT) as they had already started to develop and implement their system in three other  hospitals in northern zone Tanzania. The current system used is a combination of two web based  programs: Care2X for the medical data and webERP for store and accounting data. The hospital  management sees this system as the way forward to come to better management and accounting at  our hospital and will therefore make significant investment to initiate this system in 2009.   Workshop  At the workshop we managed to make several improvements in 2008. A new inventory was being  made and the use of the logbooks for trips was reestablished. We also managed to decrease the  amount of traveling to Arusha, causing a large reduction of our costs. We were also happy that with  the help of Ludwich Muelleder, we could repair the Mercedes Truck, enabling us to collect significant  procurements in town, for example at MSD.     Currently we have the following vehicles at our Workshop Unit:   Type of Vehicle  Number plate  Status  Mercedes Benz Lorry  T798ANQ  Working well  Nissan Patrol  T868AJN  Working good  Nissan Patrol  T542AJP  Working good  Toyota Landcruiser Hardtop  T751AAK  Moderate status  Toyota Pickup  TZK 8803  Very poor status  Toyota Landcruiser Hardtop  DFP6064  New, part of CTC project  Yamaha Motor cycle XT  ART417  Working well, assigned to Digodigo  Yamaha Moter Cycle XT  ART418  Poor state, needs repairs  Yamaha Motorcycle AG  T491ASA  Working good  A new Toyota Landcruiser Hardtop has been promised to our site as part of the CTC program; we  expect it to be delivered by EGPAF in the coming year.     Besides transport and repairs of the vehicles, the workshop unit is also supporting the hospital in  several other ways. Our specialists for water systems, carpentry and electricity have also performed  22 of 32  very well in the past year.   Canteen and Resthouse  The canteen and resthouse underwent significant improvements in 2008 in quality and quantity of  Page their services. Although the canteen and resthouse have been regarded as income providing   
    •   services, they frequently had months on which they were run at a loss. But after several  improvements were made, we managed to improve this so they did not run on debts anymore at the  end of the year.  Environment and Security  In early 2008 we were facing quite some challenges on environmental and security issues.  Destruction of the environment was happening at the more remote edges of our area. Also theft  occurred. We therefore invested in these units by attracting new staff as guards or to assist in the  maintenance of the environment. After this we saw a marked improvement within these two units: a  better feeling of security and a better protection and maintenance of our environment was  achieved.  Cleaning and Laundry  The cleaning and laundry have been performing very well under the leadership of our matron, Mrs.  Mbise. In the laundry small investments have been made by procuring new blankets, and in the  cleaning unit into equipment. In 2009 we should look how we can make more significant  investments for bed sheets and patient clothing so that the situation will be more hygienic and  comfortable for our patients.   Patient kitchen  Also in 2008 we continued providing food to our patients for free as this is seen as a necessity in our  population where malnutrition often complicates the illnesses the patients are suffering from. Due  to financial constraints and steeply increased food costs, and an significantly increased number of  inpatients, the quality of the food provided declined somewhat. It would be good to look for  additional recourses to bring up the food quality in the coming year.       23 of 32  Wasso Hospital Resthouse  Page  
    •   Satellite Site: Digodigo Dispensary  Our clinical officer Joachim Mbosha served the people of Sonjo Valley    2008 another year as the in‐charge of Digodigo Dispensary. Although the  OPD patients  6471 populations served is huge, the constraints on this dispensary are big.  Admissions  252 Most significantly these are the staff shortages and the essential drug  Deliveries  47 shortages. These problems could be solved to large extend if we could upgrade the Dispensary to  the status of a Health Centre and come into a Service Agreement with the government. Plans have  been undertaken to achieve this in the coming year. In the mean time, the dispensary has to be self  reliant in many areas; medicines for example can only be procured from their revenue made.    Although a CTC is officially already established on paper, we are discussing with EGPAF how we can  turn it into proper action. Plans for this, including the construction of a new building, have already  started to turn into actions by the end of 2008.     Despite of all constraints, Digodigo Dispensary remained among the best visited dispensaries of our  district.       Digodigo Dispensary  24 of 32  Page  
    •   Epilogue and acknowledgements  2008 has been a challenging but great year for Wasso Hospital. The medical and administrative  progress made has been very significant on almost all areas. Although all management members  were relatively new, we have been able to overcome most difficulties with the blessing of God. This  also enabled the medical team to make good progress in the care given to the people. We feel very  blessed that we have managed to significantly increase the amount of care provided while the  number of deaths have declined sharply.     I want to use this opportunity to thank all of our staff members who have contributed to this good  year. The above mentioned achievements cannot be contributed to one or a few persons only. The  achievement was made while we worked together as a team, as together everybody achieves more.  Let us also continue in the coming year on this path of improving the care to our patients.     I also want to thank the Archdiocese of Arusha for all their contributions in the past year, with most  notably the seminar the Health Secretary had organized at Bulka where we could brainstorm about  the organization within our institutions. I also want to thank Fr Tenges for the significant added  value he has brought to the different boards in his position as the general secretary.     A special word of thanks should also be given to our RMO Dr Toure and his team – among which we  also met Mrs. Nyakwela our RNO, and Dr Chandre as acting RMO. As we have unfortunately been  without a DMO in our district in 2008 and we therefore appreciate the additional supervision visits  made to our district to ensure continuing proper medical care.    Besides the huge financial assistance the hospital has received from the Ministry of Health and Social  welfare, I also want to thank several other institutions for their continuing contributions to our  hospital. As a full list of institutions/NGO’s who gave technical advices to our hospital is extensive, I  want to remain mentioning the most significant.     First I want to thank the church congregation of the Sisters Oblates de l'Assomption and the Tweega  Medica Foundation who both contributed staff to our hospital since several years. This is an  essential ‘donation in kind’ as it remained a very difficult to attract well trained staff to our remote  district hospital.     Also we are very thankful for the continuing assistance Flying Medical Service has given us the past  year. It has been a blessing to welcome one of the pilots to come every two weeks with a plane so  we could serve the people in the most remote locations of our district. Their emergency evacuations  25 of 32  have also saved many lives in the past year. And finally we were also much blessed by the spiritual  support and advices Father Pat has continued giving us in the past year, thank you for that.     Page  
    •   I want to thank the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation for their significant technical and  financial contributions for the program for the people living with HIV/Aids. In the past year we have  also appreciated very much the performance award from CORDAID. We are grateful that they were  so interested in our performance and even gave a significant award for it.    Last but not least I want to thank the Watschinger Foundation for their generous support to our  hospital. I highly appreciate their technical, financial and also personal support they have given to us.  I want to express my sincere gratitude to the work of Heini Staudinger who saw the revival of our  hospitals as his personal mission.  Although I encourage him to continue with his good work, I must  say that his help in the past year made a huge difference already.     The above few lines can actually not reflect  our full appreciation to all the different  people  who assisted the progress we made  in 2008. Realize that we really appreciated all  contributions made, no matter if they were  small or large. I feel very blessed that we  have been working with so many befriended  people who were dedicated to our vision to  provide good quality of health services in an  accessible, acceptable and affordable way.  Let us pray that we can in 2009 continue on  this good track also in 2009.     In Christ the Healer connected,     Dr Christian van Rij  Medical Officer in Charge      26 of 32  Page  
    •   Annex 1: Disease statistics  Top Ten Diseases Outpatients  Causes of Death < 5 year  Rank  Disease  Number  Disease  Number 1  Malaria  5149 Pneumonia  5 2  ARI  5580 Malaria  5 3  Diarrhoeal  1274 Diarrhoeal Diseases  4 4  Pneumonia  679 Neonatal Conditions  3 5  UTI  837 Malnourishment  2 6  Eye Infection  664 Anaemia  1 7  Worms  558 Burn  1 8  Skin Infection  415 Congenital Con.  1 9  Ear Infection  266 Other Illnesses  4 10  Anemia  112 Total  26 Top Ten Diseases Inpatients  Causes of Death > 5 year  Rank  Disease  Number  Disease  Number  1  Malaria  904 Clinical Aids  15 2  ARI  147 Malaria  6 3  Diarrhoeal  222 Cardiovascular Disease  6 4  Pneumonia  492 Tuberculosis  2 5  UTI  94 Burns  2 6  Eye Infection  16 Anaemia  2 7  Worms  40 Respiratory Conditions  1 8  Skin Infection  12 Malnourishment  1 9  Ear Infection  2 Poisoning  1 10  Anaemia  116 Diabetes  1 Other Illnesses  4   Total  41     27 of 32  Page  
    •   Annex 2: Map Ngorongoro District  28 of 32    Page  
    •   Annex 3: Ngorongoro Divisions, Wards and Population  Division  Ward  Health Facilities  Population Loliondo  Orgosorok  Wasso Hospital; Loliondo Health Centre;      51,416 Magaiduru Dispensary;   Soitsambu  Soitsambu Dispensary; Oloipiri Dispensary;       Sero Dispensary  Arash  Arash Lutheran Dispensary  Sale  Digodigo  Digodigo Dispensary; Samunge Dispensary;  39,468 Ondonyosambu  Oldonyosambu Dispensary  Sale  Sale Dispensary  Malambo  Malambo Health Centre  Pinyinyi  Ngarasero Dispensary  Ngorongoro  Ngorongoro  NCAA Dispendary  77,580 Olbalbal  Olbalbal Dispensary  Nainokanoka  Nainokanoka Dispensary  Endulen  Endulen Hospital  Kakessio  Kakesio Dispensary  Naiyobi    Total      176,045   Wasso Hospital Catchment Area describes the area where we are supposed to provide a health care  to. According to government decision, our catchment area consists of 30,002 people in 2008.     Wasso Hospital Service Area is the area where we are providing medical services to the people. This  is Loliondo Division and Sale Division as the quantity of services by other facilities was minimal in  2008.  29 of 32  Page  
    •   Annex 4: Incoming and outgoing staff in 2008  Outgoing staff  Full Name  Designation specific  Employment End  Namnyaki Lazaro Parkipuny  Nurse Officer III  31‐10‐2008  Onesmo John Kiromo  Driver I  31‐10‐2008  Jeremia Msika Kaduga  Clinical Officer II  31‐12‐2008  Kennedy Israel Dodo  Assistant Medical Officer / Dentist I  31‐12‐2008  Libori Ephrem Tarimo  Clinical Officer II  31‐10‐2008  Felix Zelote Lukumay  Laboratory Technician II  31‐10‐2008  Solomon Michael Ombati  Technician II  31‐10‐2008  Agnes Lucas Ammi  Senior Nurse  31‐10‐2008  Ansila Inyasi Silayo  Nurse Officer I  31‐10‐2008  Cecilia John Nkii  Senior Nurse  31‐10‐2008  Esther Clement  Mpondo  Nurse Officer II  31‐10‐2008  Loturiaki Ngunyi Korio  Senior Health Officer  31‐10‐2008  Febronia Mushi Simbero  Nurse Officer III  30‐11‐2008  New Incoming staff  Full Name  Designation specific  Employment Start  Claude Simon Rieser  Senior Health Secretary  1‐5‐2008  Elias Elisha Nkambi  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  James Robert Kiromo  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  Momboshi Lendano Kesike  Security Guard  1‐7‐2008  Juliana Melkiory Shirima  Medical Attendant II  1‐12‐2008  Amina Adam Ramadhan  Medical Attendant II  1‐10‐2008  Dorcas Nyaboke  Mokaya  Nurse Officer III  14‐2‐2008  Emanuela Castul Anney  Nurse II   1‐4‐2008  Flora Charles Eliphadhil  Medical Attendant II  1‐5‐2008  Hereswida  Myaki  Medical Attendant II  1‐11‐2008  Maoi Moriaso Kipakwa  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  Nossim William Mollel  Medical Attendant II  1‐7‐2008  Zaina Alfani Shemaghembe  Nurse Officer III  1‐3‐2008  Samwel Samwel Mattur  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  Sakara  Murkuk  Security Guard  1‐7‐2008  Balthazar Seho Bayo  Technician II  1‐8‐2008  Peter Emanuel Losiki  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  Sarim Joseph Kashe  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  Kanja  Motegha John  Nurse Officer III  6‐1‐2008  Joseph  Parsambey  Principal Office Assistant  1‐12‐2008  Manace  Williams  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  30 of 32        Page  
    •     Lennard Linus Daserwa  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  Lilian Albert Masawe  Nurse Officer III  29‐9‐2008  Zuwena Abdalah Christina  Nurse Officer III  29‐9‐2008  Febronia Mushi Simbero  Nurse Officer III  29‐9‐2008  Eliatikiswa Festo Pallangyo  Medical Attendant II  1‐8‐2008  Moses Tumate Kikonya  Nurse Officer III  1‐11‐2008  Jane Robert Kiromo  Medical Attendant II  1‐12‐2008  Timizaeli Laanvuni Sumunai  Medical Officer / Dentist II  4‐12‐2008  Julius Ole Sitoy Kututu  Security Guard  1‐12‐2008    It should be noted that the above two tables only reflect staff under archdiocesan contract and not  seconded staff. Some of the staff who left the Archdiocesan contract, but remained working at  Wasso as seconded staff. The significant turn over in the  group of seconded staff is also not  reflected in the above tables.         Wasso Hospital Car Outreach  31 of 32  Page  
    •   Annex 5: Communities Served with outreaches  Currently we are visiting the following 18 sites on a 4 weekly basis with our car clinics from Wasso  • Magaiduru: 40 km from Wasso Hospital  • Esero / Orkuyaine: 28 km from Wasso Hospital  • Oloipiri: 34 km from Wasso Hospital  • Engusero and Sambu: 55 km from Wasso Hospital  • Ndulele: 70 km from Wasso Hospital  • Olosho: 74 km from Wasso Hospital  • Sukenya: 34 km km from Wasso Hospital  • Orongai: 34 km from Wasso Hospital  • Maaloni: 58 km from Wasso Hospital  • Mgongo: 63 km km from Wasso Hospital  • Mageri: 59 km from Wasso Hospital  • Olorien: 30 km from Wasso Hospital  • Olosoito: 60 km from Wasso Hospital  • Oldonyowass: 45 km from Wasso Hospital  • Olobo: 11 km from Wasso Hospital  • Lopolun: 15 km from Wasso Hospital  • Oloswashi: 72 km from Wasso Hospital  • Olemeishiri: 30 km from Wasso Hospital    The following 7 sites are visited by car clinic from Digodigo Dispensary on 4 weekly basis:  • Mugholo: approximate 8km from Digodigo  • Bwelo Mugholo: approximate 10 km from Digodigo  • Kisangiro: approximate 12 km from Digodigo  • Bwele Digodigo: approximate 12 km from Digodigo  • Makurendane: approximate 10 km from Digodigo  • Masusus: approximate 60 km from Digodigo  • Tinaga: approximate 30 km from Digodigo    The following 11 sites are visited by flight clinics from Wasso on 2 weekly basis:  • Olaika  • Njurleen  • Mondorosi  • Loorbilin  • Empopongi  • Oljhoro  • Ololosokwan  • Olemnei  • Orpirikata  • Moniil  32 of 32  • Pinyiny      Page