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Workshop for new postgraduates who will be teaching

Workshop for new postgraduates who will be teaching

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  • Sit with people you not worked with/ don’t know
  • Bring in the idea of silence
  • 12.30
  • Ask for examplesIs there a policy for 1st and 2nd marking?Talk to module leader if there are concerns
  • 2.30 COFFEE
  • 15.45
  • February 11 Workshop 1 M May 26 Workshop 2Feb 2012 submission

Postgraduates who teach Postgraduates who teach Presentation Transcript

  • Introduction to Academic and Professional Practice for Postgraduate Students who Teach (PGA Part 1)
    Christine Smith
  • Learning outcomes for PGA Part 1
    By the end of the session, you will….
    Have a greater understanding of your role and responsibilities as a tutor
    Understand the basic principles of learning, and key issues of teaching in a HE context
    Be able to apply relevant principles of learning and teaching when planning sessions
    Be conversant with the teaching techniques appropriate to your context
    Understand the role of assessment in student learning
    Be aware of how you can monitor and review your own practice
  • Outline for the day
    9.30 Welcome and introductions
    9.45 Taking stock
    10.00 Student learning
    10.30 Small group teaching
    Coffee
    11.15 Working with small groups
    12.00 Questioning skills
    Lunch
    13.15 Planning a session
    14.00 Assessment and feedback
    Break
    14.45 Dealing with challenges in small group teaching
    15.30 Reviewing teaching
    15.45 What next?
    Close
  • Taking stock
    What are you looking forward to?
    What issues or challenges are you concerned about, what questions do you have?
  • Kolb’s Experiential Learning Cycle
    DO
    REFLECT/OBSERVE
    PLAN
    THINK
  • What’s your preferred learning style?
    Activist
    Reflector
    Theorist
    Pragmatist
    Do you always learn in the same way?
  • Kolb plus Honey and Mumford
    Activist
    DO
    Reflector
    Pragmatist
    OBSERVE
    PLAN
    THINK
    Theorist
  • Theory into practice
    Consider your teaching, how can you take into account Kolb’s theory and Honey and Mumford’s learning preferences?
    What can you do to encourage your students to visit all four points of Kolb’s cycle?
    How can you engage students with different learning preferences?
  • Effective small group teaching
    What you would see if you observed an effective small group session?
    What are the students doing?
    What is the tutor doing?
    You might find it helpful to reflect on your own learning experiences - good and bad!
    (10 mins)
  • Coffee
  • Small group activities and student learning
    What activities are students engaged in which help them learn?
    • Listening
    • Discussing
    • Critiquing
    • Questioning
    • Sharing
    • Concluding
    And others?
  • Ideas for activities and encouraging discussion
    • Pyramids
    • Fishbowls
    • Crossovers
    • Rounds
    • Buzz groups
    • Circular questioning
    And others?
    Brainstorming
    Problem solving
    Role play
    Syndicates
    Poster tours
    Case studies
    Debates
    Presentations
    Reading
  • Techniques for your teaching
    Pick three activities that you think are an effective teaching activity. For each technique consider:
    • Why do you think they are effective?
    • How do they enhance the student learning?
  • Creating the environment
    Furniture
    Setting expectations / ground rules
    Outline aims, structure and intended outcomes
    Set clear tasks/activities
    Sit ‘outside’ the discussions
  • Purpose of questions
    Building students’ confidence
    Checking their understanding
    Helping students think more deeply/in a more complex way about an issue/problem
    Encouraging student independence
    Probing/following up
    Re-focussing discussion
    Encouraging discussion/debate
  • Different levels of questioning
    How would you prove/disprove…?
    What changes would you make to solve…?
    What would happen if…?
    How is … related to …?
    How would you use…?
    How would you describe…?
    What is… ?
  • Common errors in questioning
    Asking too many questions at once
    Asking a question and answering it yourself
    Asking a difficult question too early
    Asking a question in a threatening way
    Not allowing student time to think before expecting the answer
  • Answering questions
    “Is this right?”
    “Where do I start?”
    “What’s the best way of approaching this?”
    Balance between providing an answer and reflecting the question back
    Encouraging students to think for themselves
    How to respond to a question when you don’t know the answer
  • Lunch
  • Planning sessions
    The learning outcomes
    Your background preparation
    Learning activities
    Practicalities
    Contingencies
  • Assessment
    What is its the purpose?
    Formative and Summative
  • Race's 'Ripples on a pond' model oflearning
    wanting/
    needing
    doing
    digesting
    feedback
  • Example Feedback
    You’ve made a good attempt at this essay. You introduce the subject well making a number of good points, in particular I think your development of the topic is strong. However there are a number of areas for improvement.
    Unfortunately there are numerous typos and punctuation errors. You really should be more carefull to avoid these silly mistakes
    There are a number of problems with your referencing. Actually your referencing is one of the worst I have seen in marking this assignment. A general comment, you should try and engage with the literature more effectively.
    In all this has been a reasonable attempt for a first essay.
  • Good Feedback Practice
    Timely
    Personal
    Empowering
    Understandable
    Manageable
    Feedback sandwich
    Explain why a particular mark has been given
  • If you’re going to be marking…
    Make sure you’re fully briefed beforehand by an experienced member of staff
    You should have a copy of the assessment criteria, instructions given to students and any other relevant information/materials (e.g. module guide)
    Make sure that your marking is checked or moderated by an experienced member of staff
    See the policy for postgraduates who teach!
  • Coffee
  • Challenging situations
    What are the challenges?
    Are there any underlying causes?
    List 3 possible ways of dealing with the situation (more if you can think of any)?
    What would you not do?
  • Gather feedback
    Interpret feedback
    Make changes
    Agree/decide on action
    Adapted from Hounsell (1999)
    Reviewing your teaching
  • Useful resources
    Colleagues
    Higher Education Academy (HEA)
    HEA Subject Centres
    Graduate Skills Programme
    Staff Development Collection (library)
    Learning and Development Centre team
  • What now?
    Do nothing!
    Do set reading and complete reflection on Part 1 to receive a formal letter of attendance
    Progress to PGA Part 2 to work towards formal accreditation for your teaching
  • PGA Part 2
    Postgraduate Award Introduction to Academic and Professional Practice (PGA IAPP)
    30 masters credits
    Attend 2 full-day workshops and 3 small group meetings
    Compile a portfolio of evidence: teaching observations, student feedback (to and from), session plans, 2 longer pieces of writing about your practice
  • For further help/information
    PGA Website: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pga
    Email: pga@warwick.ac.uk
    Christine Smith Tel: 75580
    Learning and Development Centre
    2nd floor, University House