IT103Microsoft Windows XP/OS Chap05
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IT103Microsoft Windows XP/OS Chap05

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  • This chapter explains how to manage the user-experience features of Windows XP, such as the desktop and display properties. We also cover user profiles, regional settings, and accessibility options. Much of this information will be familiar to students who are experienced with Windows XP, but a detailed understanding is important because this is the type of information that lends instant credibility to a support professional. There is nothing less impressive than an “expert” who doesn’t know how to change display settings.
  • We begin by discussing configuration of desktop components. This slide serves as a quick refresher on the placement of desktop items and the terminology used in this chapter.
  • This slide depicts the tabs of the Display Properties dialog box. As you click through the slide, you can describe the features of this dialog box. If conditions permit, you can minimize your slides and demonstrate the Display Properties dialog box on a live system. The following slides describe each tab in turn.
  • Desktop themes offer a way to quickly set the appearance of a desktop to suit the user’s taste. Windows XP ships with several default themes, and more are available by purchasing Microsoft Plus! For Windows XP. Themes are also available from online sources for purchase and download. Describe how themes are applied, and explain that any element of a theme can be altered, thus customizing the theme.
  • This slide depicts the Desktop Items dialog box, which can be accessed from the Desktop tab of the Display Properties dialog box. If conditions permit, demonstrate how to enable icons and change their appearance. The next slide briefly describes the Desktop Cleanup Wizard.
  • This slide shows the steps of the Desktop Cleanup Wizard. Be sure to mention that the icons are not permanently removed; they are merely placed in the Unused Desktop Shortcuts folder on the desktop.
  • The Screen saver tab of the Display Properties dialog box manages screen saver selection and settings. You can also access the power management settings for the system from this tab (described later). For a quick demonstration, show your students how to lock out the desktop when the screen saver deploys by selecting the On Resume, Password Protect option. Click the Preview button for a quick demonstration of the effects.
  • This slide depicts the Effects dialog box, which is accessed from the Appearance tab of the Display Properties dialog box. Demonstrate the changes that can be made by enabling the Clear Type menu or the Scrolling menu. You might also mention that Clear Type is designed for better readability with LCD screens. Note: This graphic was shot with Clear Type enabled and then disabled to demonstrate the difference that Clear Type makes on the display.
  • This slide depicts the principal tabs of the Advanced Display Settings dialog box. Step through each tab and describe the settings. Explain that this dialog box is not usually necessary for normal displays but might be required when you troubleshoot monitor settings or set nonstandard resolutions or refresh rates.
  • This slide depicts a Windows XP desktop with multiple monitors installed. Describe the graphics and list a few real-life scenarios where multiple monitor support is used (day trading, CAD design, video display walls). Be sure to mention that applications can be tiled in individual monitors or spread over all available monitors.
  • This slide shows the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog box being used to customize the appearance and behavior of the taskbar and the notification area. Point out that the dialog box changes to demonstrate the effects of the changes before they are applied.
  • This slide shows the configuration of the Windows XP Start menu and the Classic Start menu. As you step through the images, you can describe the configuration options in each dialog box. Be sure to draw attention to the Advanced tab. This tab controls which submenus, such as My Computer and My Documents, are displayed.
  • This section of this chapter described the configuration of power options in Windows XP. As you progress through this section, you might point out the differences between how to manage power for notebook computers and for desktop computers.
  • This slide features the tabs of the Power Options Properties dialog box. As you step through the graphics, describe what each tab configures. We will cover each option in more detail in upcoming slides.
  • Power schemes offer a way to quickly select default power settings based on a system’s role. As you step through the options, you can see common-sense choices being made for each role. An example is the change of the display to “always on” for Presentation mode. Point out the differences between the power management features of a notebook computer vs. a desktop computer. Discuss the reasons for choosing more stringent settings while on battery power, and ask students why each choice would be important.
  • Advanced power options let you configure the way your system behaves during use. You can have the system prompt for a password when returning from Standby or Hibernate mode. You can also designate which mode the computer should enter when you press the Standby or Power button or when you close the lid on a notebook computer.
  • This slide depicts enabling Hibernate. As you step through the images, explain that Hibernate requires enough free disk space to save the entire contents of the system’s RAM. Thus, a system with 1 GB of RAM requires at least 1 GB of free space on the system volume to enable hibernation. Explain that to hibernate the system during shutdown, you must press the Shift key to make Hibernate appear as an option.
  • APM was the first real power management standard to be supported by Windows. Computers with APM BIOS are detected during installation, and Windows XP enables APM support and APM menu options at that time.
  • ACPI is the latest supported power management standard. It replaces APM and Plug and Play as a more advanced device configuration standard. The ACPI HAL is installed during system installation. Stress that the HAL should not be changed after installation because problems can arise with device management. In extreme cases, the system will not boot.
  • UPS systems can be interfaced to Windows XP to notify the operating system and even to shut it down during extended outages before the UPS batteries run out. This interface usually relies on a serial port connection. UPS devices from different manufacturers might use different signaling techniques. It is important to ensure that the interface is correctly configured to prevent unintended shutdowns or failure to shut down during an outage.
  • User profiles store user-specific application and operating system configuration data, user data files, desktop shortcuts, Internet Explorer Favorites (bookmarks), and Start menu items. They are the principal technology behind IntelliMirror, the Microsoft user experience management infrastructure. Stored on disk in the Documents And Settings folder tree, profiles that have been designated as roaming profiles are uploaded or synchronized with a network profile location defined in Active Directory when the user logs off. This central storage allows the user to receive a consistent experience wherever he logs on.
  • This slide depicts the storage of user profiles on a Windows XP Professional system. Note the folders for desktop items, favorites, and the Start menu. Point out the All Users folder and explain its purpose. Describe circumstances under which it might be useful to know where these folders are (such as when you install custom shortcuts for users while they are logged off).
  • IntelliMirror is the Microsoft user experience management infrastructure. It is a set of technologies that together manage user data, system and application settings, and software installation and management. This chapter covers user profiles. We will discuss Group Policies in more depth in Chapter 13.
  • Windows XP has been localized for many languages and many regional preferences. The regional and language settings also allow you to manage the number systems, currency, time, date, and even right-to-left and East Asian language support. This allows Windows XP localized in one language to still support use of other languages and regional preferences and thereby be used in multinational organizations and by a wide variety of users. If time permits, demonstrate the configuration of a credible local second language for your students. Explain how this might be helpful to an author of a local bilingual newsletter.
  • Windows XP offers several tools that show what is possible to assist users with physical disabilities. Many of these features do not offer the full power and ease of use of third-party applications, but they do offer some support for disabled users and are acceptable short-term alternatives to the more expensive specialty enablement tools. You can refer interested students to the Microsoft Accessibility Web site ( www.microsoft.com/enable ) for more information on accessibility in Microsoft products.
  • By supporting a vast array of display technologies and allowing customization of virtually every display setting to suit users’ preferences, Windows XP offers every user a comfortable, intuitive user experience. Customization can include desktop, Start menu, taskbar, and display settings. Settings can be stored in a user’s profile to enable a consistent experience whenever that person uses the system. Regional and accessibility options offer support for users with different languages and different abilities.

IT103Microsoft Windows XP/OS Chap05 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE Chapter 5
  • 2. OVERVIEW
    • Configure and manage desktop components
    • Configure display options
    • Configure power management options
    • Manage users’ profiles and data
    • Configure regional and language settings
    • Manage accessibility settings
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 3. CONFIGURING AND MANAGING DESKTOP COMPONENTS Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 4. CONFIGURING DISPLAY SETTINGS Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 5. DESKTOP THEMES
    • Collection of icons, fonts, sounds, mouse pointers, etc.
    • Applied using the Themes tab.
    • Individual elements can be modified to suit the user.
    • Note: You can download many of these from  www.Customize.org
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 6. DESKTOP Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 7. DESKTOP CLEANUP Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 8. SCREEN SAVER
    • Manages screen saver selection and settings
    • Access to power management settings
    • Screen saver tab can be used to lock desktop
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 9. APPEARANCE Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 10. SETTINGS Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 11. CONFIGURING MULTIPLE DISPLAYS Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE Where would something like this be handy?
  • 12. CONFIGURING THE TASKBAR Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 13. CONFIGURING THE START MENU Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 14. CONFIGURING POWER OPTIONS
    • Power schemes
    • Advanced power options
    • Hibernate mode
    • Advanced Power Management (APM)
    • Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI)
    • Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 15. POWER OPTIONS Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 16. POWER SCHEMES
    • Home/Office Desk
    • Portable/Laptop
    • Presentation
    • Always On
    • Minimal Power Management
    • Max Battery
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 17. ADVANCED POWER OPTIONS Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 18. HIBERNATE Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE Hibernate requires enough free disk space to save the entire contents of the system’s RAM. Thus, a system with 1 GB of RAM requires at least 1 GB of free space on the system volume to enable hibernation.
  • 19. ADVANCED POWER MANAGEMENT (APM)
    • Older power management standard
    • APM is detected during installation
    • Supported via non-ACPI hardware abstraction layer (HAL)
    • APM options enabled only if detected
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 20. ADVANCED CONFIGURATION AND POWER INTERFACE (ACPI)
    • Latest power management standard
    • Also supports advanced device configuration
    • Requires ACPI BIOS
    • ACPI HAL installed during Windows installation
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 21. UNINTERRUPTIBLE POWER SUPPLY (UPS)
    • Interfaced UPS can notify user of outages
    • System can shut down after designated interval
    • Some UPS devices use different signals
    • Read UPS interface instructions carefully
    • Note: When would you use a UPS?
    • PowerChute program
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 22. USER PROFILES
    • User profiles contain user-specific configuration data
    • Stored in Documents And Settings folder tree
    • Can be portable (roaming profiles)
    • Roaming profiles are stored in network location
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 23. USER PROFILES (CONTINUED) Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 24. INTELLIMIRROR TECHNOLOGIES
    • User data management (User Profiles)
    • User settings management (User Profiles and Group Policies)
    • Software installation and maintenance (Group Policies)
    • Note: It is a set of technologies that together manage user data, system and application settings, and software installation and management.
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 25. REGIONAL AND LANGUAGE OPTIONS
    • Configure Windows XP to support various localities
    • Manage number systems and currencies
    • Manage time and date displays
    • Control locality switching when more than one locality is configured
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 26. ACCESSIBILITY OPTIONS
    • Offer limited support for users with disabilities
    • Keyboard options for users with limited mobility
    • Sound Sentry for users with hearing impairment
    • Magnifier and Narrator for users with vision impairment
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE
  • 27. SUMMARY
    • Taskbar and Start menu can be customized.
    • User profiles enable roaming (IntelliMirror).
    • Regional options enable multinational use.
    • Accessibility options allow disabled users to use Windows XP.
    Chapter 5: CONFIGURING AND MANAGING THE USER EXPERIENCE