CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Pamela Anderson-BruléPresidentAnderson Brulé Arc...
CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Rob BarthelmanPrincipalVBN Architects<br />Great...
 Contextual Learning
 Common Goals
  Greater Ability to Expand Fulfillment
 Financial Partnering
 Percentage Partners
 Collective Programmatic Contributions
 Achieving More
 Share Resources
 Finances, Land, Facility, HR
 Revenue Development
 Rent/Lease</li></li></ul><li>CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Recent Survey of I...
CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Four (4) National Expanding Programs Through Par...
Creating Community Synergy<br />Pamela Anderson-BruléPresidentAnderson Brulé Architects<br />Bigger ideas, better spaces t...
Creating Community Synergy<br />SJ<br />RDA<br />VCCS<br />SJPL<br />SJSU<br />TCC<br />VBPL<br />Martin Luther King <br /...
Creating Community Synergy<br />Who Does The Library Serve?    <br />LocationSan José State Univ., San José<br />The City ...
Creating Community Synergy<br />Who Does The Library Serve?    <br />LocationTidewater Community College & The City of Vir...
Creating Community Synergy<br />Martin Luther King Jr. Library<br />Goals<br /><ul><li>Replace Aging and Failing Facilities
Build a Partnership Between City and University
Increase Funding Capacity and Priority for Both Institutions</li></ul>Partnership Initiatives<br /><ul><li>End Decade Old ...
Redevelop Primary Downtown and University Edge with a Community  Icon and Gateway
Create a Successful Funding and Financing Strategy
Stimulate Surrounding Redevelopment
Lower Operational Costs While Increasing Quality of Service</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />Tidewater Le...
Build a Center for Community that Increases Synergy within the Community
Create a Gateway to Campus and a Regional City Center</li></ul>Partnership Initiatives<br /><ul><li>Create a Centerpiece f...
Provide a Catalyst for Community Collaboration
Generate a Self Sustaining Community Model
Increase Quality of Service</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />Common Goals<br /><ul><li>Strengthen Financi...
Stimulate Redevelopment
Develop Iconic Gateways
Lower Operational Costs
Increase Quality of Service</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />How Did The Community Stretch The Concept an...
Success of the Partnership Became a Driving Force and Continued Growth of Workforce Development, Technology Partnerships a...
A Center of Community that Drives Dialogue and Learning
Supports Life Long Learning and Becomes the Bridge Between Social, Economic and Educational Divides
Redefines a Sustainable Community Model</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />What Did The Institution Gain By...
A New Approach from City to University/College
Library Users of All Ages Are Intimately Introduced to the Possibility of University/College Education
Greater Level of Service
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Community & Curriculum @ SCUP 2011

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This session focuses on recognizing community needs outside the academic environment that allow the institution to creatively develop strategies to facilitate program development and funding. By broadening the concept of the communities served, four exemplary institutions have achieved national stature as resources for government training programs (STEMP), promoting community environmental activism, facilitating lifelong learning, and blurring the line between academic and community environments.

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Community & Curriculum @ SCUP 2011

  1. 1. CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Pamela Anderson-BruléPresidentAnderson Brulé ArchitectsPat CornelyExecutive DirectorKirsch Center for the EnvironmentDe Anza Community College<br /> Jenna BragerFarm CoordinatorIndian Valley Organic Farm & Garden <br />Rob BarthelmanPrincipalVBN Architects<br />
  2. 2. CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Rob BarthelmanPrincipalVBN Architects<br />Greater Prevalence of Community-Focused <br />Partnerships, Public-Private in Educational Planning<br /><ul><li> Curricular Advancement
  3. 3. Contextual Learning
  4. 4. Common Goals
  5. 5. Greater Ability to Expand Fulfillment
  6. 6. Financial Partnering
  7. 7. Percentage Partners
  8. 8. Collective Programmatic Contributions
  9. 9. Achieving More
  10. 10. Share Resources
  11. 11. Finances, Land, Facility, HR
  12. 12. Revenue Development
  13. 13. Rent/Lease</li></li></ul><li>CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Recent Survey of Institutions Involved in Partnership<br />Top Five Objectives of the Partnership<br />Facilitate Learning and Skills Development<br />Advance Learning Objectives<br />Workplace and Career Opportunities<br />Enhance Curriculum<br />Connect to the Community<br />Other Objectives<br />Achieve More Collectively<br />Expanded Service Offerings<br />Shared Financial and Physical Resources<br />Primary Activities Fostered<br />Learning Events and Activities<br />Curriculum/Service Support, Teacher Development<br />Work Experience Programs (Internships, Mentoring, Job Training)<br />Annual Global Business-Education-Community Partnerships Survey<br />
  14. 14. CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Four (4) National Expanding Programs Through Partnerships Developed Out of Institutional and Community Need <br /><ul><li>Joint-Use Libraries in San Jose, CA and Virginia Beach, VA</li></ul> Pamela Anderson-Brulé,<br /><ul><li>Kirsch Center For The Environment, De Anza College, San Jose, CA</li></ul>Pat Cornely<br /><ul><li>Indian Valley Organic Farm & Garden Pat Cornely</li></ul>Jenna Brager<br />
  15. 15. Creating Community Synergy<br />Pamela Anderson-BruléPresidentAnderson Brulé Architects<br />Bigger ideas, better spaces through collaboration<br />
  16. 16. Creating Community Synergy<br />SJ<br />RDA<br />VCCS<br />SJPL<br />SJSU<br />TCC<br />VBPL<br />Martin Luther King <br />Jr. Library<br />Learning Resource Center<br />
  17. 17. Creating Community Synergy<br />Who Does The Library Serve? <br />LocationSan José State Univ., San José<br />The City of San José<br /> Population: 1,000,000<br />San José State University<br /> SJSU Population: 29,600 Students<br />Budget<br /> Size: 475,000 SF<br /> Budget: $102,000,000<br />Main Library<br /> 65/35 Partnership, (50/50) <br />Schedule & Timeline<br />1997<br />1999<br />2001<br />2000<br />2002<br />2003<br />1998<br />“Idea”<br />MOU<br />O/A<br />OPEN<br />OPERATIONAL PLANNING / IMPLEMENTATION<br />FEASIBILITY<br />STRATEGIC<br />OPS PLAN<br />Construction<br />Programming / <br />Design<br />Process <br />Design /<br />Facilitation<br />
  18. 18. Creating Community Synergy<br />Who Does The Library Serve? <br />LocationTidewater Community College & The City of Virginia Beach<br />The City of Virginia Beach <br />Population: 434,000<br />Tidewater Community College<br /> TCC Population: 40,000 Students<br />Learning Resource Center<br /> Size: 120,000 SF<br /> Budget: $125,000,000<br />Branch Library/LRC<br /> 83% TCC, 17% City of Virginia Beach<br />Schedule & Timeline<br />2005<br />2007<br />2009<br />2008<br />2010<br />2011<br />2006<br />2012<br />OPEN<br />O/A<br />MOU<br />OPERATIONAL PLANNING/<br />IMPLEMENTATION<br />FEASIBILITY<br />STRATEGIC<br />OPS PLAN<br />FUNDING<br />Programming<br />& Design<br />Construction<br />
  19. 19. Creating Community Synergy<br />Martin Luther King Jr. Library<br />Goals<br /><ul><li>Replace Aging and Failing Facilities
  20. 20. Build a Partnership Between City and University
  21. 21. Increase Funding Capacity and Priority for Both Institutions</li></ul>Partnership Initiatives<br /><ul><li>End Decade Old Battles Through Collaboration
  22. 22. Redevelop Primary Downtown and University Edge with a Community Icon and Gateway
  23. 23. Create a Successful Funding and Financing Strategy
  24. 24. Stimulate Surrounding Redevelopment
  25. 25. Lower Operational Costs While Increasing Quality of Service</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />Tidewater Learning Resource Center<br />Goals<br /><ul><li>Attract Funding Through a Creative and Collaborative Process
  26. 26. Build a Center for Community that Increases Synergy within the Community
  27. 27. Create a Gateway to Campus and a Regional City Center</li></ul>Partnership Initiatives<br /><ul><li>Create a Centerpiece for the New Planned Community Development
  28. 28. Provide a Catalyst for Community Collaboration
  29. 29. Generate a Self Sustaining Community Model
  30. 30. Increase Quality of Service</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />Common Goals<br /><ul><li>Strengthen Financing and Funding Approval
  31. 31. Stimulate Redevelopment
  32. 32. Develop Iconic Gateways
  33. 33. Lower Operational Costs
  34. 34. Increase Quality of Service</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />How Did The Community Stretch The Concept and Build On The Ideas?<br /><ul><li>Transform the Communities’ Thinking About Libraries
  35. 35. Success of the Partnership Became a Driving Force and Continued Growth of Workforce Development, Technology Partnerships and Beyond
  36. 36. A Center of Community that Drives Dialogue and Learning
  37. 37. Supports Life Long Learning and Becomes the Bridge Between Social, Economic and Educational Divides
  38. 38. Redefines a Sustainable Community Model</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />What Did The Institution Gain By Altering Its Community?<br /><ul><li>Iconic Building and New Activated Urban Center
  39. 39. A New Approach from City to University/College
  40. 40. Library Users of All Ages Are Intimately Introduced to the Possibility of University/College Education
  41. 41. Greater Level of Service
  42. 42. Hours of Service
  43. 43. Quality of Service
  44. 44. Access to Collections and Special Features
  45. 45. Highest Ratio of University Collection by Public Users
  46. 46. Highest Ratio of Public Collection Use by University Students
  47. 47. Expanded Language Collections Use
  48. 48. Demand Has Never Become an Issue</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />Strategies To Achieve Goals<br /><ul><li>Explore Both Operational and Development Requirements for Success
  49. 49. Dialogue With the Community
  50. 50. Define Steps through Structured and Rigorous Process
  51. 51. Clear Path to Funding and Financing </li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />Unexpected Outcomes<br /><ul><li>New Partnership Possibilities Between the City and University
  52. 52. University City Internship Program
  53. 53. Joint Projects for Arts and Community Celebrations
  54. 54. Budget Scheduling Differences, Difficult to Navigate in a Tight Economy
  55. 55. Less Flexibility Within Each System with the Partner Agreement </li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />Outcomes<br />What was Successful?<br /><ul><li>The Creation of a Community Place
  56. 56. The Redefinition of a Library
  57. 57. A Catalyst to Development and Change
  58. 58. Both Projects Were Funded in Challenging Times</li></ul>What was Unsuccessful? How Could this be Avoided?<br /><ul><li>Continued Partnering after Leadership Changes
  59. 59. Aligning Budget Needs of Both Organizations
  60. 60. Maintaining a Collaborative Approach</li></ul>How does Contribution Size Matter?<br /><ul><li>Big Dog/Little Dog
  61. 61. 50/50 Partnership
  62. 62. Leadership and Approval Structure</li></li></ul><li>Creating Community Synergy<br />Outcomes<br /><ul><li>When Expanding Possibilities the Outcome is Greater than the Individual Expectations
  63. 63. You Cannot Plan for All Aspects of a Future Joint Use Project – There Will Always be Surprises
  64. 64. You Must Embed Operational Changes with Physical Changes to Ensure Long-term Success</li></li></ul><li>Contextual Learning<br />Pat CornelyExecutive Director Kirsch Center for the EnvironmentDe Anza Community College<br />Curriculum that meets student and community needs<br />A Building That Inspires Students<br />First LEED Platinum Building in the CA Community College in the Nation<br />
  65. 65. Contextual Learning<br />Institutional Planning Goals<br /><ul><li> A Building That Teaches
  66. 66. Energy efficiency, resource conservation and environmental stewardship.
  67. 67. Teamwork
  68. 68. Building functionality is directly linked to effectiveness of instruction and to our students. Everyone has a place at the table.
  69. 69. Welcomes the Public
  70. 70. Building orientation, visible rooftop PV panels, and native landscaping including the Cheeseman Environmental Studies Arboretum.
  71. 71. Embrace Civic & Community Engagement
  72. 72. Local case studies in wildlife corridors, city street lighting, and watershed projects, to name a few.
  73. 73. Institutionalized Energy Efficiency in the California Community Colleges
  74. 74. Grants from the CEC and PG&E and
  75. 75. Led to SEMP training for CCC staff.</li></ul>Why should Colleges and Universities become “agents of change”?<br />
  76. 76. Contextual Learning<br />3 Global Challenges<br />Save open space, species, habitat, connectivity and movement corridors<br />Protect, preserve or restore all aspects of our environment and Earth’s systems: water, air, soil, species, ecosystems, energy and minerals (WASSEEM)<br />Educate and build stewardship principles in our students, community, state and nation for our children and future generations<br />
  77. 77. Contextual Learning<br />Community: From Field Trips To …<br /><ul><li> 4 certificate and degree programs provide a broad base for our students for vocational training and transfer to CSU / UC
  78. 78. Collaboration with our local communities in projects that enhance student learning and meet local needs
  79. 79. Work in partnership with resource agencies, transportation agencies, open space authorities, land trusts, private landowners and others in community-based projects</li></ul>The Kirsch Center is a building that inspires Teamwork and Community<br /><ul><li> Focus on Stewardship, Leadership, Team building and Collaboration in our classes, programs and community</li></li></ul><li>Contextual Learning<br />Sustainability – A Team Approach<br />Goal: As a team, it is our collective responsibility to educate & assist others in implementing sustainability goals<br />Sustainability . . . A team approach<br /><ul><li>Set your course: develop a mission statement and establish sustainability goals
  80. 80. Assess your organizational structure for decision-making hierarchy & policy
  81. 81. Identify key personnel - students, faculty, finance, facilities and other key leadership
  82. 82. Identify outside barriers - state policy
  83. 83. Change policies that hinder progress– A Blueprint for Sustainable Buildings & Energy Policy
  84. 84. Constantly revisit your mission/goals</li></li></ul><li>Contextual Learning<br />Mission Statement<br />Mission Statement<br />The Kirsch Center for Environmental Studies commits to environmental protection as a fundamental objective and integral part of educating our students and the public. Using a community-based conservation approach, we will partner with industry, government, utilities and other academic institutions.<br />Building as Text Book<br />Energy performance compared to a typical building:<br /><ul><li> the total regulated energy cost is reduced by 88%
  85. 85. Costs are reduced from nearly $75,000 per year to $10,000 per year
  86. 86. Annual savings of $65,000 per year for the college</li></li></ul><li>Contextual Learning<br />Outcome<br />Institutionalization of Environmental Stewardship into California’s Educational System <br />“. . . working for the common environmental good through its democratic institutions at all educational and professional levels. . . <br />Excerpt from the California Education Code Section 8701<br />“Build it and they will come”<br /><ul><li> Students love being in the Kirsch Center… they don’t want to go leave at night!
  87. 87. Our student programs have grown to over 1,400 students per quarter, making us one of the fastest growing programs on campus</li></li></ul><li>Contextual Learning<br />21st Century Problems<br /><ul><li> Global warming
  88. 88. Biodiversity crisis
  89. 89. Toxic wastes
  90. 90. Degraded ecosystems
  91. 91. Pollution
  92. 92. Desertification
  93. 93. Human population</li></ul>Require 21st Century thinkers, Individuals who can:- identify & explain environmental problems- examine the human impacts- seek out problem-solving approaches - work toward sustainable solutions- think “outside” the box- see the bigger picture<br />
  94. 94. Contextual Learning<br />Our Goal:<br />Training Stewards of the Earth’s Natural Resources and our Environment<br />Our Strategy:<br />Four (4) degree & certificate programs and over 100+ ES & ESCI classes<br /><ul><li> Energy Management & Climate Policy
  95. 95. Pollution Prevention
  96. 96. Biodiversity Specialist
  97. 97. Wildlife Corridor Technician Program Environmental Stewardship</li></li></ul><li>Contextual Learning<br />Kirsch Center as a “Beacon of Hope”<br />
  98. 98. Organic Farm Program <br />Jenna BragerFarm CoordinatorIndian Valley Organic Farm & Garden<br />College Of Marin<br />Novato, CA<br />Addressing<br />Community Needs &Building Relationships<br />
  99. 99. Organic Farm Program <br />Identifying Community Need – A Farm!<br /><ul><li> Many Organizations Collaborated</li></ul> UCCE, Farm Bureau, Marin Ag Land Trust, County Office of Ed, Marin Community Foundation, Marin Conservation League, and more<br /><ul><li> Community Meeting
  100. 100. 2 year Community Study</li></li></ul><li>Organic Farm Program <br />Meeting Community Need<br /><ul><li> Accessibility – 2 miles off highway, rather than rural
  101. 101. Agricultural education for older students – middle school and up
  102. 102. Training for next generation of farmers
  103. 103. Job training for low income residents
  104. 104. Improve enrollment at College of Marin</li></li></ul><li>Organic Farm Program <br />3 Community Partners<br />University of California Cooperative Extension, Marin<br />– Master Gardeners Program <br />Planning and Development, Horticultural Expertise, Public Programs, <br />Site Specific Projects<br />College of Marin <br />Location, Water, Workforce, Classes<br />Conservation Corps North Bay<br />Management, Funding, Workforce<br />College of Marin<br />Indian Valley Campus<br />
  105. 105. Organic Farm Program <br />Who Works On The Farm?<br /><ul><li> Students: Work/Study and Farm Class
  106. 106. AmeriCorps Members
  107. 107. Middle School Students
  108. 108. Volunteers
  109. 109. Master Gardeners
  110. 110. Conservation Corps North Bay crews
  111. 111. Conservation Corps North Bay staff
  112. 112. Farm Advisors</li></li></ul><li>Organic Farm Program <br />Who Does The Farm Serve? <br />College of Marin Students<br /><ul><li> Farm as Classroom
  113. 113. Farm as Job Training</li></ul>Corpsmembers<br /><ul><li> Corps-to-Career</li></ul>Schools<br /><ul><li> Tours - Kindergarten through University
  114. 114. Project ReGeneration – Middle School</li></ul>Future Farmers! <br /><ul><li> Job Training
  115. 115. Marketing Relationships – Restaurants, etc.</li></ul>Current Farmers!<br /><ul><li> Skilled Labor </li></ul>Local Residents / Food Consumers<br /><ul><li> Garden Training – Workshops
  116. 116. Produce Sales</li></li></ul><li>Organic Farm Program <br />Who Does The Farm Serve? <br />Local People Who Like To Eat Good Food<br /><ul><li> Farm Stand
  117. 117. Farmers Market
  118. 118. Veggie Boxes</li></ul>Schools<br /><ul><li> Daycare Veggie Boxes
  119. 119. Lunch Programs - Marin Organic: www.marinorganic.org</li></ul>Restaurants<br /><ul><li> Rustic Bakery
  120. 120. Boca Steak & Seafood
  121. 121. Boca Pizzeria</li></ul>Local Food Bank<br />
  122. 122. Organic Farm Program <br />Successes<br /><ul><li>Farm program doubled enrollment at College of Marin’s Indian Valley Campus in 2 years!
  123. 123. 23 students have worked/learned as farm crew.
  124. 124. Education Award Program - $55,000 in AmeriCorps scholarships has been awarded.
  125. 125. Currently in 5th semester of farm class. 162 students have completed the course. The class always has a wait list.
  126. 126. 9 workshops and 270 attendees, in partnership with Master Gardeners
  127. 127. Program participants farming: 2 through AmeriCorps, 2 in Asia, 10 at local Marin County farms
  128. 128. Summer youth program, Project ReGeneration - youth earned $63,000 in scholarships while serving community and working on the farm.</li></li></ul><li>Organic Farm Program <br />Challenges<br /> Balancing Educational Mission with Market Commitments<br /><ul><li> Meeting Demand
  129. 129. Giving Tours and Getting the Work Done</li></ul>Organizational Structure<br /><ul><li> Many part-time employees</li></ul>Organic Standards<br /><ul><li> Strict Regulations, Enormous Record Keeping</li></ul>Center of Activity – Success AND Challenge<br />
  130. 130. Organic Farm Program <br />What’s Next?<br />Grow Food – Grow Community<br />March 24<br /><ul><li>CA State Department of Labor press conference at our farm on March 24 announcing the first ever State-approved Organic Farm Apprenticeship Program through a Community College in the Nation!
  131. 131. College Credit, Working While Learning, Hands-On
  132. 132. Allows students opportunities on other local farms</li></li></ul><li>Organic Farm Program <br />Thank you!<br />
  133. 133. CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Recent Survey of Institutions Involved in Partnership<br />GROWTH and SUCCESS<br />Changes in Education/Community Partnerships That Were Polled<br />Increase in Demand<br />Education, Government, and Business Agendas Driving Change<br />More Use of Technology<br />More Community Involvement<br />Addressing Emergent Issues<br />Greatest Assistance in Making Education/Community Partnership Successful<br />Clear Vision; Desired Achievement<br />Strong Leadership and Management<br />Good Communication Amongst Stakeholders<br />A Shared Sense of Ownership<br />Strong Partnership Culture<br />Annual Global Business-Education-Community Partnerships Survey<br />
  134. 134. CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Recent Survey of Institutions Involved in Partnership<br />LESSONS: ATTRIBUTES OF STRONG COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS<br />Attributes of Successful Community Partnerships<br />Leaders Encourage and Support Change<br />Leaders Seek Incremental Changes<br />Barriers That Prevent Leaders’ Support of Change<br />Too Busy for Change<br />Curriculum, Scheduling, and Facilities Not Supportive of Change<br />Annual Global Business-Education-Community Partnerships Survey<br />
  135. 135. CAPTURING OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND PROGRAMS BY FULFILLINGCOMMUNITY NEED<br />Copies of this Presentation can be obtained by contacting: SCUP@vbnarch.com<br />Jenna BragerFarm CoordinatorIndian Valley Organic Farm & Gardenjbrager@conservationcorpsnorthbay.org<br />Pat CornelyExecutive Director Kirsch Center for the EnvironmentDe Anza Community CollegeCornelyPat@fhda.edu<br />Pamela Anderson-BruléPresidentAnderson Brulé Architectspamela@aba-arch.com<br />Rob BarthelmanPrincipalVBN Architectsrob@vbnarch.com<br />

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