Aspen - High Quality Education for All
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Aspen - High Quality Education for All

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Past : Age of Darkness ...

Past : Age of Darkness
- No Formal Schools for Teaching Science
- No Concept of Science, Math in Education Curriculum
- Exception to this is, Schooling at the Time of Greeks (Archimedes, Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle, Socrates)

Present : Age of Machines
- Formal Schooling started with Advent of Industrial Revolution in Europe

Future : Age of Reasoning
- Education K-12 – focuses on Knowledge Discovery and Application of Abstract Concepts
- Guide Students to do research as primary mode of learning
- Each Student must have his/her own journey and experience the beauty of knowledge.

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  • Resourceshttp://www.usnews.com/education/worlds-best-universities-rankings/top-400-universities-in-the-world
  • Resourceshttp://www.usnews.com/education/worlds-best-universities-rankings/top-400-universities-in-the-world
  • Resourceshttp://www.usnews.com/education/worlds-best-universities-rankings/top-400-universities-in-the-world
  • Times of IndiaIndian Students Ranks 2nd Last in OECD Rankings. http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/education/news/Indian-students-rank-2nd-last-in-global-test/articleshow/11492508.cmsGuardianWorld Education Ranking http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/dec/07/world-education-rankings-maths-science-reading?fb=nativeOECD 2011 Resulthttp://www.pisa.oecd.org/document/29/0,3746,en_32252351_32235731_46513821_1_1_1_1,00.htmlMath Science Data explorer for various International Testshttp://nces.ed.gov/surveys/international/ide/
  • Times of IndiaIndian Students Ranks 2nd Last in OECD Rankings. http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/education/news/Indian-students-rank-2nd-last-in-global-test/articleshow/11492508.cmsGuardianWorld Education Ranking http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/dec/07/world-education-rankings-maths-science-reading?fb=nativeOECD 2011 Resulthttp://www.pisa.oecd.org/document/29/0,3746,en_32252351_32235731_46513821_1_1_1_1,00.htmlMath Science Data explorer for various International Testshttp://nces.ed.gov/surveys/international/ide/
  • Wikipediahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trends_in_International_Mathematics_and_Science_Study
  • ExamplesVilayanur Subramanian Ramachandran (Tamil: விளையனூர்இராமச்சந்திரன், born 1951) is a neuroscientist known for his work in the fields of behavioral neurology and visual psychophysics. He is the Director of the Center for Brain and Cognition,[1][2][3] and is currently a Professor in the Department of Psychology[4] and the Neurosciences Graduate Program[5] at the University of California, San Diego.Ramachandran is noted for his use of experimental methods that rely relatively little on complex technologies such as neuroimaging. According to Ramachandran, "too much of the Victorian sense of adventure [in science] has been lost."[6] Despite the apparent simplicity of his approach, Ramachandran has generated many new ideas about the brain.[7] He has been called "The Marco Polo of neuroscience" by Richard Dawkins and "the modern Paul Broca" by Eric Kandel.[8] In 1997 Newsweek named him a member of "The Century Club", one of the "hundred most prominent people to watch" in the 21st century.[9] In 2011 Time listed him as one of "the most influential people in the world" on the "Time 100" list.[10][11]
  • Learning by rote prevalent in top Schools http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-opinion/article2707562.eceAmong Mahatma Gandhi, Indira Gandhi, Rajiv Gandhi and Sonia Gandhi, who is still alive? Only a little over a third of class 4 students interviewed as part of a five-city school survey in India got this one right, with a small percentage saying it is Mahatma Gandhi. As many as two-thirds of students, also from class 4, who were asked to state the length of a pencil — placed against a ruler — could not give the right answer.Nearly half the students in classes 4, 6 and 8 thought the shape of a square object would change if it is tilted. And about 45 per cent of students in these classes seemed to believe that a spider has six legs, despite the arthropod being described or named as ‘eight-legged' in almost all Indian languages.These findings are not based on responses from underprivileged children going to State-funded schools in rural areas. These are drawn from 89 of the country's top schools, each of which had a library, a laboratory and enough computers, and 93 per cent stated they had internet facilities. And 63 per cent of the parents of these children hold a degree, post-graduate degree or doctorate, and more than 41 per cent of the fathers were into their own business.The significance of this study is that it shows that even the country's top schools exhibit signs of rote learning. And in their formative years, children in primary and upper primary classes show “lower sensitivity” and “demonstrate lack of progressive thought” on issues related to gender equality, acceptance of diversity and in civic responsibilities.In a telling instance, 40-43 per cent of students in classes 4, 6 and 8 felt that education for a girl is not as important as her responsibility towards her family; and in another, nearly 60 per cent of students showed less acceptance towards immigrants from other States, as they felt that “immigrants have to conform to the State's traditions, take away jobs from natives and also are a source of communal disagreements.”On the academic side, the performance of class 4 students was below international average, but by the time they reach class 8, they are on a par with the global average. And even here, it is due to doing better in answering questions that require straightforward use of techniques or learnt procedures and not those that tested their conceptual understanding. Another significant finding is that misconceptions acquired in lower classes continue in higher classes without any correction.The extent of the studyThese are some of the findings of a ‘Quality Education Study' (QES) by Wipro and Educational Initiatives (EI), covering 23,000 students, 790 teachers and 54 principals from 89 schools across the country. While the study aimed at expanding the understanding of ‘quality' in school education and attributes of a sound learning environment, it has thrown up interesting insights into learning outcomes both in terms of scholastic performance and student attitudes towards various social issues.Eighty-three ‘top schools' from Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai and Bangalore, as identified in a public opinion survey in 2006 by Wipro-EI as part of their ‘Students' Learning in Metros Study' in these five cities were chosen for the study. Six more schools, out of 10 identified by experts, as learning environments that needed to be included, were also roped in. These 89 had agreed to participate in the study out of 255 that the study team approached. A sub-sample of 16 schools was chosen for focus group discussions.Another salient feature of the QES is that student performance seems to have fallen since 2006, when a study on learning in the metros was done. While 64 schools were common to both studies, students performed lower in QES, with the fall being more pronounced in mathematics (in both classes 4 and 6) and English (class 8).On critical thinkingDrawing a correlation between the students' lack of critical thinking and their views on social issues, the study says, “Rote learning is often deceptive and passes off as apparent learning, but does not let students develop higher order thinking skills such as critical thinking, creativity and application. Students who do not develop these skills also will not be able to think rationally and discriminate between what is good or bad in various social and ecological issues being faced today.”Responding to a question on HIV infection, nearly 40 per cent of students of class 8 either said HIV positive people should be avoided as one could get infected by going near them or that they should not be allowed to use public facilities such as pumps and toilets. Only 37.5 per cent said HIV positive people are capable of participating in everyday life like those with any other disease. In a question related to citizenship issues, 18.6 per cent of students said they would vote on the basis of caste affiliation, while 60 per cent chose either a candidate who promised development or one who worked for the underprivileged.In similar questions concerning the environment and traffic rules, the ideal answer that would show that students are aware of their civic responsibilities eluded more than half the students interviewed. Of course, the trend improves as one moved to the higher classes, but the study's authors feel that schools are not doing enough to address the problem. It was possible that the students are not evolving their own thinking and discrimination, or that they are mimicking opinions that society or their families may have on social issues. “Some of them indicate a bias that may over time grow into prejudices,” warns the report.The study recommends a large-scale awareness campaign among schools on notions of quality, as “while there may be many notions on what constitutes quality education, there is likely to be unanimous agreement in that schools should be places where students develop holistically.” It suggests a structured process of speaking to children and carefully listening to their answers to understand the thinking behind student responses to different social, cultural, civic and ecological issues.Recalling that the National Curriculum Framework says education must promote and nourish a wide range of capabilities in our children such as the performing arts, painting, crafts, literary abilities and ability to bond with nature, the study says: “schools are not able to devote more than 19 per cent of school time to co-scholastic activities. Principals confirmed that while co-scholastic areas are very relevant, in practice, not much emphasis is placed on these in the curriculum.”Some children are showing a disturbing insensitivity to social issues, says a WIPRO-EI study.
  • BBC – Why do Finlands School get best results?http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8601207.stmOECD Result for Math, Science and Languagehttp://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/54/12/46643496.pdfhttp://www.oecd.org/document/12/0,3746,en_33873108_33873360_46623628_1_1_1_1,00.htmlEducation: Korea and Finland top OECD’s latest PISA survey of education performance07/12/2010 - Korea and Finland top the OECD’s latest PISA survey of reading literacy among 15-year olds, which for the first time tested students’ ability to manage digital information. The survey, based on two-hour tests of a half million students in more than 70 economies, also tested mathematics and science. The results for 65 economies are being released today.

The next strongest performances were from Hong Kong-China, Singapore, Canada, New Zealand and Japan.Full results.The province of Shanghai, China, took part for the first time and scored higher in reading than any country. It also topped the table in maths and science. More than one-quarter of Shanghai’s 15-year-olds demonstrated advanced mathematical thinking skills to solve complex problems, compared to an OECD average of just 3%.
  • Switzerland Educationhttp://www.sbf.admin.ch/htm/themen/bildung_en.htmlSwitzerland's education systemThe Swiss education system can be divided roughly into four levels: primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary.Compulsory education (primary level and secondary level I): The system varies from canton to canton with primary education constituting from four to six years of the nine-year compulsory education period. The admission age throughout Switzerland is six. Pre-school children attend kindergartens for one to two years. After four to six years of primary tuition pupils complete their compulsory education at secondary level I.Secondary level II constitutes the first phase of non-compulsory education. There are four types of education open to students:An apprenticeship with on-the-job training and theoretical courses at a vocational school. There are more than 300 recognised trades open to school leavers. Another less usual method of learning a trade is full-time education at a vocational school. On completing this type of vocational education and training, graduates receive a diploma called the advanced federal certificate.Either during or after their apprenticeship, students can attend further courses to qualify for a professional baccalaureate. On the basis of this certificate they can be admitted to the universities of applied sciences without the necessity of sitting an entry exam, and by taking a supplementary examination it is possible to study at a university.Matura schools (cantonal school, grammar school, lycée) give pupils a broad general education in seven basic subjects, a major subject and a minor. Matura schools are the usual route taken by those who wish to go to university.Specialised middle schools teach both general and specific subjects such as those required for certain professions in health and social work, education, music and arts. In addition students can earn a professional graduating certificate after taking additional practical training or courses.Tertiary level: At the Tertiary A level there are two types of higher education institutes with differing educational thrusts: firstly the traditional universities including the cantonal universities and the federal institutes of technology, where instruction is centered on basic research. Secondly there are the universities of applied sciences whose teaching is based on applied research. In addition there are many options in the field of higher vocational education and training (Tertiary B level) with the practically oriented certificate and diploma exams and courses at the colleges of higher vocational education and training.
  • http://academic.cuesta.edu/intlang/german/education.html
  • http://academic.cuesta.edu/intlang/german/education.html
  • Chaos Theory Research The flapping of a single butterfly's wing today produces a tiny change in the state of the atmosphere. Over a period of time, what the atmosphere actually does diverges from what it would have done. So, in a month's time, a tornado that would have devastated the Indonesian coast doesn't happen. Or maybe one that wasn't going to happen, does. (Ian Stewart, Does God Play Dice? The Mathematics of Chaos, pg. 14http://www.imho.com/grae/chaos/chaos.htmlChaos Theory for Beginners; an introductionA tiny difference in initial parameters will result in a completely different behavior of a complex system.The Uncertainty Principle prohibits accuracy. Therefore, the initial situation of a complex system can not be accurately determined, and the evolution of a complex system can therefore not be accurately predicted.Complex systems often seek to settle in one specific situation. This situation may be static (Attractor) or dynamic (Strange Attractor).
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • HOWARD GARDNER'S NINE MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES:http://www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/education/ed_mi_overview.htmlDr. Howard Gardner, a psychologist and professor of neuroscience from Harvard University, developed the theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) in 1983. The theory challenged traditional beliefs in the fields of education and cognitive science. Unlike the established understanding of intelligence -- people are born with a uniform cognitive capacity that can be easily measured by short-answer tests -- MI reconsiders our educational practice of the last century and provides an alternative.According to Howard Gardner, human beings have nine different kinds of intelligence that reflect different ways of interacting with the world. Each person has a unique combination, or profile. Although we each have all nine intelligences, no two individuals have them in the same exact configuration -- similar to our fingerprints. To read about the benefits of MI and for tips on implementing MI in your classroom, visit the Tips section. For additional MI resources, visit theResources section.1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what's on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don't just remember music easily, they can't get it out of their minds, it's so omnipresent.4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind -- the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can't do, and to know where to go if they need help.8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It's an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians -- anybody who deals with other people.9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.
  • Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspen

Aspen - High Quality Education for All Aspen - High Quality Education for All Presentation Transcript

  • EducationPAST - Age of DarknessPRESENT - Age of MachinesFUTURE - Age of ReasoningAraf Karsh HamidASPEN PlatformFree High Quality EducationHigh Quality Education is a fundamental right ofevery child on this planet
  • AgendaRealityCheck• What’s Wrong with theSystem?Change• Do we really need thechange?Idea• TheJourney?• NextStepsMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 2RCIN
  • Agenda - Details• Reality Check• Evolution of Schools• Top 200 Universities WorldWide• Proof of Research or is itProof for No Research • What’s wrong with thecurrent system?May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 3RRCIN
  • Agenda - Details• Reality Check• Evolution of Schools• Top 200 Universities WorldWide• Proof of Research or is it Prooffor No Research • What’s wrong with the currentsystem?• Do we Really Need a Change?• World Speaks (State of IndianEducation)• Education System World Wide• Change• Quality Education for All• Thinking Starts now….• Thinking…..• Chaos TheoryMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 4RCRCIN
  • Agenda - Details• Reality Check• Evolution of Schools• Top 200 Universities WorldWide• Proof of Research or is it Prooffor No Research • What’s wrong with the currentsystem?• Do we Really Need a Change?• World Speaks (State of IndianEducation)• Education System World Wide• Change• Quality Education for All• Thinking Starts now….• Thinking…..• Chaos TheoryMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 5 The Idea• The Core• From the Beginning• The High School• The Collaboration• Share• Lead• Monitor• The Technology• Share• Lead• Journey• ASPEN Platform Next Steps• The Core Team• Revenue ModelRCINRCIN
  • Evolution of Schools• Past : Age of Darkness• No Formal Schools for Teaching Science• No Concept of Science, Math in Education Curriculum• Exception to this is, Schooling at the Time of Greeks(Archimedes, Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle, Socrates)• Present : Age of Machines• Formal Schooling started with Advent of Industrial Revolution inEurope• Future : Age of Reasoning• Education K-12 – focuses on Knowledge Discovery andApplication of Abstract Concepts• Guide Students to do research as primary mode of learning• Each Student must have his/her own journey and experience thebeauty of knowledge.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 6R
  • WHERE DO WE (INDIA) STANDON EDUCATION GLOBALLY?Comparing Universities and PrimaryEducationMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 7R
  • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 12 2 2 2 23 345 5 5 57 78911 111230540102030405060Top 200 Universities World Wide 2011/12Top 3USA (54), UK (30)Germany (12)May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 8RChina (12), Japan (11)Switzerland (7)South Korea (5)
  • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 12 2 2 2 23 345 5 5 57 78911 111230540102030405060Top 200 Universities World Wide 2011/12• Why No Indian Institutes in Top 200?• IIT Delhi – Rank #218 (The best Indian Rank)• Are we (India) poorer than these countries ?• Taiwan - Rank #87• Malaysia - Rank #167• Mexico - Rank #169• Brazil - Rank #169• Thailand - Rank #171• Singapore - Rank #28, 02 Universities• S. Korea - Rank #42, 05 Universities• China - Rank #186, 12 Universities1 University eachTop 3USA (54), UK (30)Germany (12)May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 9RChina (12), Japan (11)Switzerland (7)South Korea (5)
  • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 12 2 2 2 23 345 5 5 57 78911 111230540102030405060Top 200 Universities World Wide 2011/12• Why No Indian Institutes in Top 200?• IIT Delhi – Rank #218 (The best Indian Rank)• Are we (India) poorer than these countries ?• Taiwan - Rank #87• Malaysia - Rank #167• Mexico - Rank #169• Brazil - Rank #169• Thailand - Rank #171• Singapore - Rank #28, 02 Universities• S. Korea - Rank #42, 05 Universities• China - Rank #186, 12 Universities• Compare this stats with Population• Singapore population is 4 million• Kerala is 35 Million (0 Universities)• Kerala has 95% literacy rate still no IIT/IIM• Out of 400 Top Universities Only 6 from India1 University eachTop 3USA (54), UK (30)Germany (12)May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 10RChina (12), Japan (11)Switzerland (7)South Korea (5)
  • PrimaryEducationMay18,2013Copyright(c)OZAZOPvtLtd,201311RPISA Test2011HighSchool
  • PrimaryEducationMay18,2013Copyright(c)OZAZOPvtLtd,201312PISA Test 2011 – India Ranks 72nd, SECOND LAST!!!!The average 15-year-old Indian is over 200 points behindthe global topper. Comparing scores, experts estimate thatan Indian eighth grader is at the level of a South Koreanthird grader in math abilities or a second-year studentfrom Shanghai when it comes to reading skills.RPISA Test2011HighSchool
  • PrimaryEducationMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 13R
  • Proof of Research ????• Nobel Laureates from India1. Rabindranath Tagore (Literature Nobel 1913, Calcutta)2. C V Raman (Presidency College Madras, University ofCalcutta, Physics Nobel 1930)3. Hargobind Khorana (Punjab University, LiverpoolUniversity, Chemistry Nobel 1968)4. Mother Teresa (Peace Nobel 1979)5. S. Chandrashekhar (Presidency College Calcutta, University ofMadras, Trinity College Cambridge, Physics Nobel 1983)6. Amartya Sen (Presidency College Calcutta, Trinity CollegeCambridge, Economics Nobel 1998).• That’s just 3 (Science) Nobel Laureates Post Independence!!• Compared to 853 Nobel Laureates from 1901 to 2011.• Out of the four 3 of them received the Nobel Laureates afterdoing research in West and other one (Mother Teresa) got aNobel Price for Peace.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 14R
  • Proof of NO Research1. How will a kid be passionate about research or exploration if hedoesn’t develop interest in that topic?1. There by he/she will loose out the joy of discovery.2. The Concept of Research is doing-it-by-yourself. Exactly opposite toRote Learning. Someone who scored very high marks by RoteLearning, what research will that person do?3. Concept of research and discovery and the joy of discovery muststart from primary education. Rote learning will end up in kid gettingclueless about the subjects he got to pursue at grad or post grad level.4. Research is the by product of being passionate about a specific field.5. As per the latest Goldman Sachs Report three times more Ph.Ds. arecoming out of China in comparison to India.6. One of the Primary reason why Indian Institute don’t show up in thetop 200 is absence of research. Imagine if research is not happeningin IIT’s what will be the state of other professional colleges.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 15R
  • INDIAN EDUCATION SYSTEM SUMMARY• No Universities in the Top 200 Universities World Wide• Only 6 Universities in the Top 400 Universities WorldWide• In Primary Education, out of a total 73 countries, India’sRank is 72nd.• Just 3 (Science) Nobel Laureates Post Independence!!May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 16R
  • What’s wrong with the system?• Learning by Rote• Kids learning capabilities are different. However, we applysame teaching methods across all students.• Current Education System is modeled on requirements fromIndustrial Revolution (150 years old requirements).• No option to find the talents of the Students. Everyone islooked or evaluated from the same lens of academic model.• Can we confidently say that A Well knownScientist, Musician, Sports person, Economist, Cardio Surgeonof the future is a by product of our current system?• Classic Example – VS Ramachandran – Neuro Scientist –Known as Marco Polo of understanding Human Brain, nevergot admission to the best Medical Institute after he finished hisschooling.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 17R
  • DO WE REALLY NEED ACHANGE?May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 18C
  • World speaks• N R Narayana Murthy who feels that the Indian educationsystem is decaying. When he articulated hisdisappointment at the declining quality of engineersgraduating from the Indian Institutes of Technologyearlier this month, he was only saying what the rest of usare thinking. Oct, 2011• As per the Assocham study, India was at the last positionin terms of quality of secondary education while Russiaand Brazil had maximum scores in developing economies.• Infosys spends $170 million for training fresh graduates.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 19C
  • Education system worldwide• Let us understand, How the following countriesmodeled their education system.• Finland• Singapore• Switzerland• Germany• CanadaMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 20C
  • Finland• Finnish children don’t start school until they are 7• They rarely take exams or do homework until they arewell into their teens.• There is just one standardized test when the kids reach 16• The children are not measured at all for the first 6 yearsof their education. Its about being ready to learn andfinding your passion.• They are the topers in International test (OECD) forMath, Science and Language and India stands SecondLast (72nd Rank).• Teachers are selected from the top 10%May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 21C
  • SingaporeMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 22C
  • Singapore• The inner circle centering on life skillsensures that students acquire soundvalues and skills to take them throughlife as responsible adults and activecitizens. It comprises the non-academiccurriculum.• The middle circle on knowledge skillsseeks to develop students’thinking, process and communicationskills. This will enable students toanalyze and use information and beable to express their thoughts and ideasclearly and effectively. It comprisesskills-based subjects.• The outermost circle covers thecontent-based subject disciplines i.e.Languages, Humanities & the Arts, andMathematics & Sciences. It ensuresthat students have a good grounding incontent across different areas of study.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 23C
  • SingaporeMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 24C
  • SwitzerlandMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 25C
  • Germany• In the first four grades of elementary school(Grundschule), all children are taught together. Thecurriculum stresses language skills and mathematics.• During the fourth year of elementary school, children andtheir parents usually decide on the type of secondaryschool which begins with grade 5:Hauptschule, Realschule, Gymnasium orGesamtschule.• The choice is determined by a students aptitudes, careeraspirations and grades.• In order to facilitate the choice, most states offer a two-year transition period or orientation phase(Orientierungsstufe) for grades 5 and 6.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 26C
  • Germany• German students have the opportunity to pursue formal job-skillstraining at a much younger age than in the U.S. About one third of theGerman secondary student population graduates from Hauptschule afterthe 9th or 10th grade with a Hauptschulabschluß, a diploma certifyingthe equivalent of a 10th grade education at a U.S. high school.• They can transfer to a Berufsfachschule (full-time job-skills trainingschool) or pursue a formal dual-track job-skills training program: athree-year paid internship paired with classroom instruction. Graduatesof the program enter the employment market as specialists in labor andtechnical fields.• Many open small businesses or work in the service industry. They canupgrade their specific skills by continuing formal training at aFachschule (upper level career training school) .• Graduates of the training program also have the option of continuingformal education at a Fachoberschule (specialized college-oriented highschool), grades 11 through 13, and obtain a Fachabitur, a certificatewhich allows college-level studies in a restricted field of majors at aFachhochschule (polytechnic university.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 27C
  • Summary• Finland with least amount of homework and almostZERO tests (well into teens) gets the top rank in WorldWide tests on Math, Science and Language.• These top countries focus on bringing the best out of thestudents.• Students have the liberty to choose different streams asper their talent and passion.• There is hardly any performance gap between the Top andBottom Students in these countries.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 28C
  • YES WE NEED CHANGEIf you still feel that our Education system is good then, thispresentation has reached its end.Or if you think the following statement is valid then proceed May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 29C
  • Change• 2nd law of thermo dynamics says Entropy alwaysincreases • Change is constant• Its time, there needs to be revolutionary change requiredin Education.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 30C
  • Quality Education for ALL• The idea is to bring in Quality Education to All• Especially focusing on the Poor and Middle Class• Education should be Fun and Research based and the keyshould be discovering knowledge.• Students must have choices to pursue their passion• Concept of Elementary School, Middle, High Concept must beemphasized.• Students must be thrilled to move to the next phase in K-12• Education must focus on Quality rather than Quantity of theSubjects• Students must feel like having an exciting Journey ofdiscovering various knowledge portals instead of thinking thatthe goal of education is passing exams.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 31C
  • THINKING STARTS NOWMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 32C
  • Thinking………………....• What is the most resilient parasite? A bacteria? A virus?An intestinal worm?• Its an IDEA..!!• An Original idea so simple, will be stuck in mind forever.• An idea that can change in peoples lives and seep in thesystem like a silent storm.• How about a model, a platform, an infrastructure whichenrolls all of us to learn, work, explore andenjoy, endlessly!!• A platform for the people, by the people, of the people!May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 33C
  • Chaos Theory• Chaos theory studies the behavior of dynamical systems thatare highly sensitive to initial conditions, an effect which ispopularly referred to as the butterfly effect.• Initial conditions for a kid in the school will dramaticallychanges the life of the kid. Getting the right set of initialconditions tuned for each individual kid will be our goal. Suchthat, the life path it creates should be close to the best possiblepath for the kid.• Applying Chaos Theory to achieving our Vision : small smallCHANGES (butterfly effect) from our side can literally bringin the Silent Tornado which will change the EducationParadigm.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 34C
  • THE IDEAFree High Quality Education to AllMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 35I
  • The Concept• The Concept is described in the next few slides as follows• The Core• From the Beginning to High School• From Childhood to teenage• Shows, How the Journey will be unraveled for the kids• The Collaboration• This set of slides shows how the collaboration ofStudents, Teachers and Parents across the globe make thestudents Journey an exciting one.• The Technology and the benefits• This section shows how the Technology unifies all thesedifferent puzzles and how it unites them and how everyonewill benefit from the platform.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 36I
  • THE COREFrom the Beginning to the High SchoolMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 37I
  • What is intelligence?• The ability to create an effective product or offer a servicethat is valued in a culture;• A set of skills that make it possible for a person to solveproblems in life;• The potential for finding or creating solutions forproblems, which involves gathering new knowledge.• By Dr. Howard Garner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 38I
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 39I2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence1. Linguistic Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential Intelligence1. Linguistic IntelligenceThe capacity to uselanguage to express whatson your mind and tounderstand other people.Any kind ofwriter, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person forwhom language is animportant stock in trade hasgreat linguistic intelligence.
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 40I2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence1. Linguistic Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential Intelligence2. Logical / Mathematical IntelligenceThe capacity to understandthe underlying principles ofsome kind of causalsystem, the way a scientistor a logician does; or tomanipulatenumbers, quantities, andoperations, the way amathematician does.
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 41I1. Linguistic Intelligence2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential IntelligenceThe capacity to understandthe underlying principles ofsome kind of causalsystem, the way a scientistor a logician does; or tomanipulatenumbers, quantities, andoperations, the way amathematician does.3. Musical Rhythmic IntelligenceThe capacity to think inmusic; to be able to hearpatterns, recognizethem, and perhapsmanipulate them. Peoplewho have strong musicalintelligence dont justremember musiceasily, they cant get it outof their minds, its soomnipresent
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 42I1. Linguistic Intelligence2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential IntelligenceThe capacity to understandthe underlying principles ofsome kind of causalsystem, the way a scientistor a logician does; or tomanipulatenumbers, quantities, andoperations, the way amathematician does.The capacity to think inmusic; to be able to hearpatterns, recognizethem, and perhapsmanipulate them. Peoplewho have strong musicalintelligence dont justremember musiceasily, they cant get it outof their minds, its soomnipresent4. Bodily/Kinesthetic IntelligenceThe capacity to use yourwhole body or parts of yourbody (your hands, yourfingers, your arms) to solvea problem, makesomething, or put on somekind of production. Themost evident examples arepeople in athletics or theperformingarts, particularly dancing oracting.
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 43I1. Linguistic Intelligence2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential IntelligenceThe capacity to uselanguage to express whatson your mind and tounderstand other people.Any kind ofwriter, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person forwhom language is animportant stock in trade hasgreat linguistic intelligence.The capacity to understandthe underlying principles ofsome kind of causalsystem, the way a scientistor a logician does; or tomanipulatenumbers, quantities, andoperations, the way amathematician does.The capacity to think inmusic; to be able to hearpatterns, recognizethem, and perhapsmanipulate them. Peoplewho have strong musicalintelligence dont justremember musiceasily, they cant get it outof their minds, its soomnipresentThe capacity to use yourwhole body or parts of yourbody (your hands, yourfingers, your arms) to solvea problem, makesomething, or put on somekind of production. Themost evident examples arepeople in athletics or theperformingarts, particularly dancing oracting.5. Spatial IntelligenceThe ability to represent thespatial world internally inyour mind -- the way asailor or airplane pilotnavigates the large spatialworld, or the way a chessplayer or sculptorrepresents a morecircumscribed spatialworld. Spatial intelligencecan be used in the arts or inthe sciences.
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 44I1. Linguistic Intelligence2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential IntelligenceThe capacity to uselanguage to express whatson your mind and tounderstand other people.Any kind ofwriter, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person forwhom language is animportant stock in trade hasgreat linguistic intelligence.The capacity to understandthe underlying principles ofsome kind of causalsystem, the way a scientistor a logician does; or tomanipulatenumbers, quantities, andoperations, the way amathematician does.The capacity to think inmusic; to be able to hearpatterns, recognizethem, and perhapsmanipulate them. Peoplewho have strong musicalintelligence dont justremember musiceasily, they cant get it outof their minds, its soomnipresentThe capacity to use yourwhole body or parts of yourbody (your hands, yourfingers, your arms) to solvea problem, makesomething, or put on somekind of production. Themost evident examples arepeople in athletics or theperformingarts, particularly dancing oracting.The ability to represent thespatial world internally inyour mind -- the way asailor or airplane pilotnavigates the large spatialworld, or the way a chessplayer or sculptorrepresents a morecircumscribed spatialworld. Spatial intelligencecan be used in the arts or inthe sciences.6. Naturalist IntelligenceThe ability to discriminateamong living things(plants, animals) andsensitivity to other featuresof the natural world(clouds, rockconfigurations). Thisability was clearly of valuein our evolutionary past ashunters, gatherers, andfarmers; it continues to becentral in such roles asbotanist or chef.
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 45I1. Linguistic Intelligence2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential IntelligenceThe capacity to uselanguage to express whatson your mind and tounderstand other people.Any kind ofwriter, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person forwhom language is animportant stock in trade hasgreat linguistic intelligence.The capacity to understandthe underlying principles ofsome kind of causalsystem, the way a scientistor a logician does; or tomanipulatenumbers, quantities, andoperations, the way amathematician does.The capacity to think inmusic; to be able to hearpatterns, recognizethem, and perhapsmanipulate them. Peoplewho have strong musicalintelligence dont justremember musiceasily, they cant get it outof their minds, its soomnipresentThe capacity to use yourwhole body or parts of yourbody (your hands, yourfingers, your arms) to solvea problem, makesomething, or put on somekind of production. Themost evident examples arepeople in athletics or theperformingarts, particularly dancing oracting.The ability to represent thespatial world internally inyour mind -- the way asailor or airplane pilotnavigates the large spatialworld, or the way a chessplayer or sculptorrepresents a morecircumscribed spatialworld. Spatial intelligencecan be used in the arts or inthe sciences.The ability to discriminateamong living things(plants, animals) andsensitivity to other featuresof the natural world(clouds, rockconfigurations). Thisability was clearly of valuein our evolutionary past ashunters, gatherers, andfarmers; it continues to becentral in such roles asbotanist or chef.7. Intrapersonal IntelligenceHaving an understanding ofyourself; knowing who youare, what you can do, whatyou want to do, how youreact to things, which thingsto avoid, and which things togravitate toward. We aredrawn to people who have agood understanding ofthemselves. They tend toknow what they can and cantdo, and to know where to goif they need help.
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 46I1. Linguistic Intelligence2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential IntelligenceThe capacity to uselanguage to express whatson your mind and tounderstand other people.Any kind ofwriter, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person forwhom language is animportant stock in trade hasgreat linguistic intelligence.The capacity to understandthe underlying principles ofsome kind of causalsystem, the way a scientistor a logician does; or tomanipulatenumbers, quantities, andoperations, the way amathematician does.The capacity to think inmusic; to be able to hearpatterns, recognizethem, and perhapsmanipulate them. Peoplewho have strong musicalintelligence dont justremember musiceasily, they cant get it outof their minds, its soomnipresentThe capacity to use yourwhole body or parts of yourbody (your hands, yourfingers, your arms) to solvea problem, makesomething, or put on somekind of production. Themost evident examples arepeople in athletics or theperformingarts, particularly dancing oracting.The ability to represent thespatial world internally inyour mind -- the way asailor or airplane pilotnavigates the large spatialworld, or the way a chessplayer or sculptorrepresents a morecircumscribed spatialworld. Spatial intelligencecan be used in the arts or inthe sciences.The ability to discriminateamong living things(plants, animals) andsensitivity to other featuresof the natural world(clouds, rockconfigurations). Thisability was clearly of valuein our evolutionary past ashunters, gatherers, andfarmers; it continues to becentral in such roles asbotanist or chef.8. Interpersonal IntelligenceThe ability to understandother people. Its an abilitywe all need, but isespecially important forteachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians --anybody who deals withother people.
  • Theory of multiple intelligencesDr. Howard Gardner – Harvard UniversityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 47I1. Linguistic Intelligence2. Logical / Mathematical Intelligence3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence5. Spatial Intelligence6. Naturalist Intelligence7. Intrapersonal Intelligence8. Interpersonal Intelligence9. Existential IntelligenceThe capacity to uselanguage to express whatson your mind and tounderstand other people.Any kind ofwriter, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person forwhom language is animportant stock in trade hasgreat linguistic intelligence.The capacity to understandthe underlying principles ofsome kind of causalsystem, the way a scientistor a logician does; or tomanipulatenumbers, quantities, andoperations, the way amathematician does.The capacity to think inmusic; to be able to hearpatterns, recognizethem, and perhapsmanipulate them. Peoplewho have strong musicalintelligence dont justremember musiceasily, they cant get it outof their minds, its soomnipresentThe capacity to use yourwhole body or parts of yourbody (your hands, yourfingers, your arms) to solvea problem, makesomething, or put on somekind of production. Themost evident examples arepeople in athletics or theperformingarts, particularly dancing oracting.The ability to represent thespatial world internally inyour mind -- the way asailor or airplane pilotnavigates the large spatialworld, or the way a chessplayer or sculptorrepresents a morecircumscribed spatialworld. Spatial intelligencecan be used in the arts or inthe sciences.The ability to discriminateamong living things(plants, animals) andsensitivity to other featuresof the natural world(clouds, rockconfigurations). Thisability was clearly of valuein our evolutionary past ashunters, gatherers, andfarmers; it continues to becentral in such roles asbotanist or chef.The ability to understandother people. Its an abilitywe all need, but isespecially important forteachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians --anybody who deals withother people.9. Existential IntelligenceThe ability and proclivityto pose (and ponder)questions aboutlife, death, and ultimaterealities.
  • May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 48NOW,Think and Keep your MINDblank for few secondsI
  • The Core Questions• Why do we have a single school for 14 years?• How can the school focus on kids from that wide range ofAge spectrum (6 -18 years)?• Why cant we have specialized schools focusing onspecial phases in a students growth like• Elementary School• Middle School• High School• Next section of slides show cases how the Core –Concept is in sync with the theory of MultipleIntelligence.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 49I
  • Purpose of education• Personal Development• Enrichment of Cognitive Abilities• Attainment of Higher Intellectual Plane• Contribution to the Existing Body of Knowledge• A Model CitizenMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 50I
  • Think differentHere’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. Thetroublemakers.The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see thingsdifferently.They are not fond of rules. And they have no respect for thestatus quo.You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them.About the only thing you cant do is ignore them. Because theychange things.They push the human race forward. And while some may seethem as the crazy ones, we see genius.Because the people who are crazy enough to think they canchange the world, are the ones who do.- 1997 Apple AD Created by TBWA/CHIAT/DayMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 51I
  • from the beginning• Elementary School K-5• Language (One or Two)• Science• Math• Logic (Puzzles, Games likeChess, Checkers)• Creativity(Art, Music, Dance, Sports, Teamwork)• Ethical Behavior• ASPEN Platform• Dream Journal, Dream Space• Storyboard, Inter ConnectedStoryboards• Collaboration, My Learning• Last Year starts the Journey ofVirtual life where passion andtalents will be discovered• End of Elementary Phase• Graduation – Sense of Achievementfor KidsMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 52 Middle School 6-8• Mandatory Subjects• Language• Science• Math• Choose Minimum Two• Language (Poetry and Prose)• Logic (Puzzles, Games likeChess, Checkers)• Creativity(Art, Music, Dance, Sports, Team workand Leadership)• Humanities(History, Civics, Geography, Philosophy)• Ethical Behavior (part of the Mandatorysubjects) ASPEN Platform• Dream Journal, Dream Space• Storyboard, Inter Connected Storyboards• Collaboration, My Learning• Virtual Journey reaches a stage wheretalents are discovered. End of Middle Phase• Graduation CeremonyI
  • High School• Freedom to choose the next 4 Years based on the kids talents, dreams andambitions. Curriculum tuned to each individual students talents andcapabilities.• Final 4 Years (9-12)• Engineering Stream (Basic - Mechanical, Civil, Electronics, ComputerScience)• Industrial Design and Technology• Medical Stream• Arts & Literature Stream (Languages, Journalism, Creative Writing)• Pure Science Stream (Math, Physics, Chemistry)• Creativity Stream (Arts, Music, Painting, Sports)• Business Stream(Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Commerce, Statistics, BusinessComputing, Accounting, Business Ethics)• Humanities Stream(Politics, History, Civics, Geography, Philosophy, Sociology, Law)• Ethical Behavior (as part of most of the streams like MedicalEthics, Business Ethics, Engineering Ethics, Social Ethics etc.,)• ASPEN PlatformMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 53I
  • High school• Students can choose Multiple Streams if required.• Students can Take a Primary Stream and additional subjects fromvarious other streams as per their career goals. For Example anEngineering student can take Leadership and Entrepreneurship fromBusiness Stream, if he/she feels its going to add value to his careerambition.• Adding an year to any streams results in an Associate Degree(Diploma) with specific skill sets.• With three phase Graduation Ceremony students will have the feel ofachieving things based on their true talents and passion.• If they want to continue further (for higher studies, graduation / postgraduation) and master those subjects which they are passionateabout, then they have a clear idea and goals for their future.• These students will never do a JOB, they will do what they LOVEand PASSIONATE about.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 54I
  • The Core – Summary• Kids learn things at their own pace.• They have choice to choose streams right from middleschool.• High School Stream are more focused towards careerdriven courses for Graduation and Post Graduation.• The most important aspect of the Journey is to unravelthe talents of the kids, polish it in High School, so thatwhen they go for higher studies they will choose thecourses what they are passionate about.• Overall development of the Student is the key focus ofthe Journey.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 55I
  • THE COLLABORATIONStudents, Teachers, Parents –World Wide CommunityMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 56• Share• Lead• MonitorI
  • Collaboration : Share• The Virtual Journey starts at the age of 10 in ElementarySchool.• Collaboration with other Kids on• Ideas, Stories, Puzzles, Games• Work in a Group of similar interests & projects• Projects are shared across the world• Students can Rate Teachers based on the online guidanceon projects and Abstract ConceptsMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 57I
  • Collaboration : Lead• Students are encouraged to lead in those concepts they havemastered.• They are encouraged to be the coach of other Students• Other Students can rate and acknowledge the Guidance of aStudent Coach.• A Student Coach can start a project from a research perspectiveincluding other Students who are interested in the same topic.Thus, here the MANTRA for a kid is not WIN but, EXCEL.And by knowledge sharing the spirit developed in a kid will be: For me to excel, others have to excel. Thus, its Excellence inGenerosity! May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 58I
  • Collaboration : Monitor• Teachers and Parents can monitor the progress of thestudent online.• Parents will have quick snapshots of the talents of theirkids and how they progress in various subjects and theirinterests.• External Teachers (Globally) can recommend / guide astudent’s activities or projects. This gives the students aglobal platform to showcase their talent.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 59I
  • THE TECHNOLOGYShare & Master theconcepts, Lead and Have FunMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 60• Share• Lead• The Journey• ASPEN PlatformI
  • Technology - Share• The school curriculum content is built and shared byteachers and other experts world wide. An example ofthis model is Wikipedia.• Content can be Rated and Tagged by anyone.• 14 Years of School Education is available Globally to allthe kids absolutely free.• Multi-media content (Various School Subjects) will beavailable in Browser as well as popular Tablets(Android, iOS)• Akash Android Tablet available for $20 in India.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 61I
  • Technology – Lead• Content, Coach (Student) or Teacher Rating will followthe most popular eBay model.• This will create a transparent system for all to competeand part knowledge in the right way.• Ratings will results in special awards to the students (asCoach), as well as Teachers.• These overall ratings can be aggregated to come up withthe overall ratings of a School. Identify in what subjectsthe school is popular or good at.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 62I
  • Technology – Journey• A Virtual Journey Game• Defines different levels with Key Knowledge Concepts from various subjects.• Coaches (Students) can create new levels for other students to master theconcepts and conquer the terrain.• The Game starts at Grade 5 and ends at Grade 12• Based on the interesting subjects selected by the kids, they will be able toexplore different domains based on the selected subjects.• Levels in the domains (Example Physics, English Literature) will be based onthe Grade (Class 5, Class 6 etc).• Getting into a different Level requires mastery of the subject for that domainand crossing the hurdles created by teachers and other Students (Coaches).• Every student will go through virtual game to learn different topics andconcepts.• Kids across the globe can participate in this and create their virtualcommunities/societies, build cities, and other works as part of their schoolprojects.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 63I
  • ASPEN PLATFORMLets your imagination go wildMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 64I• Storyboard• Dream Journal• Dream Space• Knowledge Tree
  • What’s ASPEN?• Aspen Trees grows in large clonalcolonies derived from a singleseeding and spreading by means ofroots.• New Stem appears 30-40 metersfrom the parent tree.• Each individual tree lives for 40-150years.• Root system (network) lives longer.• One such Aspen colony in Utah(US) is estimated to be 80,000 yearsold.• They are able to survive forestfires, because the roots are belowthe heat of the fire.• They spread 1m per year, eventuallycovering many hectares.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 65I ASPEN Platform Dream Journal Dream Space Storyboards Inter Connected Storyboards Collaboration My Learning
  • Aspen – The platform• Like the ASPEN Colony, the platform brings inTechnology, Creativity, Community (Students, Teachers &Parents), under a single platform, easily accessible anyone fromanywhere.• An Open Platform to build Education Content byStudents, Teachers, Parents and shared across the globe free.• Platform will use Web 3.0 technologies to be available in threedifferent segments• Web 3.0 App in Browser (Chrome, Firefox – Desktops)• Smart Phones (Android, iOS)• Tablets (Android, iOS)• It will help the community to Build, Use, and Share theContent.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 66I
  • Platform – benefits• Freedom for kids to pursue their passion.• Better and Free knowledge to all, and an Education modelwhich focuses on talent and research.• Earn Revenue for Teachers and Students for partingQuality Education.• Community of teachers across the globe, giving exposuresto them to understand the changing socio economic andtechnological advances.• Better Ranking for Schools / Colleges based on actualdata.• Technical Details of Aspen Platform available separatelyMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 67I
  • NEXT STEPSMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 68• Team Structure• Key Patentable Ideas• Revenue Model• QuestionsN
  • The Team• The Core Team Focuses on Content Creation and facilitate anindependent Journey for the students, to explore the world intheir own pace.• The Technical Team Focuses on creating the platform whereStudents, Teachers and Parents, can collaborate, and activelyparticipate and monitor the progress of students. Bring out thebest in them, by driving their passion at their own pace.• The Creative Team Focuses on creating an ambience where thecuriosity of the kids are maintained until they move out ofGrade 12.• The Focus of the Entire Team is to make the Students Masterthe Concepts and the Applicability of those Concepts (whichthey are passionate about) and make the Journey an excitingJourney for them.May 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 69N
  • Key Patentable ideas1. The whole Concept using Web 3.0 and TabletTechnologies2. Dream Space3. Dream Journal4. Storyboard5. The Inter Linking of Dream Journal and Storyboards, andCollation of Dream Journals in Dream Space and DreamSpace being a Single window into the minds of students.6. Concept of Knowledge Sharing and Collaboration7. Concept of Content Creation & ManagementMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 70N
  • Questions?RealityCheck• What’s Wrong with theSystem?Change• Do we really need thechange?Idea• TheJourney?• NextStepsMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 71RCIN
  • LOOKING FORWARD TO ANEXCITING JOURNEYThank YouMay 18, 2013Copyright (c) OZAZO Pvt Ltd, 2013 72araf.karsh@ozazo.com