It’s OK to copy, right?Students’ Perception of PlagiarismBy Angela Urquhart(butifandthat.com)
(maternalfocus.com)
Types ofPlagiarismall without acknowledging theauthorCopy andpasteParaphrasingReasoningStylecopyingCopyinganalogies ormeta...
Reasons for plagiarising• Quick and easy• Referencing is a low priority• Poor self-esteem• Exciting (Mitchell, 2007)• Lack...
What policy? Primary schools maybase policies on theBoard of StudiesCurriculum(Board of Studies, 20o6) “All My Own Work”...
School responsibilitiesTeachers need to: use best practice teach skills emphasise goodacademic practice be aware of wh...
Implications(facebook.com)Primary school level:• few, if any consequencesHigh school level:• work may not be acceptedHSC L...
Teacher Librarian StrategiesGlatt PlagiarismPurdue OWL WebsitePlagiarism CheckerDealDetectDeter(Brett, 2009 as cited inShe...
Responsible use of informationThe first thing teachersneed to learn is tounderstand why plagiarismhappens.(Wilson, 2006)Te...
Classroom StrategiesPrimary teachers can: discuss intellectual property discuss giving credit to authors use the term p...
School policy developmentPersuasion is not enough toeliminate plagiarism. Talkabout what plagiarismmeans and what theconse...
Conclusion Suggested Readings1. Do digital citizens become effective lifelong learners if theirinformation literacy skills...
Referencesbeyondtheclassroom.wikidot.com (n.d.). Retrieved 23 April 2013 from http://www.google.com.au/searchBoard of Stud...
ReferencesMa, H.J., Wan, G., & Lu, E.Y. (2008). Digital cheating and plagiarism in schools. Theory IntoPractice, 47(3), 19...
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It's OK to copy, right? Students' perception of plagiarism

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It's OK to copy, right? Students' perception of plagiarism

  1. 1. It’s OK to copy, right?Students’ Perception of PlagiarismBy Angela Urquhart(butifandthat.com)
  2. 2. (maternalfocus.com)
  3. 3. Types ofPlagiarismall without acknowledging theauthorCopy andpasteParaphrasingReasoningStylecopyingCopyinganalogies ormetaphorsCopyingcreativeideas orsolutionsBuyingpapersPresentingotherpeople’swork(Five Types of Plagiarism n.d., Wilson, 2007)
  4. 4. Reasons for plagiarising• Quick and easy• Referencing is a low priority• Poor self-esteem• Exciting (Mitchell, 2007)• Lack of ability• No decisions to be made (Wilson, 2007)• Peer culture• Pressure to achieve• Few consequences• What’s the big deal? (Ma, Wan & Lu, 2008)• Point of difference: culturally acceptable (Wilson, 2007)e-geress.org
  5. 5. What policy? Primary schools maybase policies on theBoard of StudiesCurriculum(Board of Studies, 20o6) “All My Own Work” acompulsory module forthe HSC(Board of Studies, 2011)
  6. 6. School responsibilitiesTeachers need to: use best practice teach skills emphasise goodacademic practice be aware of whatplagiarism looks like(Pavey, 2011)(beyondtheclassroom.wikidot.com)
  7. 7. Implications(facebook.com)Primary school level:• few, if any consequencesHigh school level:• work may not be acceptedHSC Level:• significant penalties(Board of Studies, 2006)
  8. 8. Teacher Librarian StrategiesGlatt PlagiarismPurdue OWL WebsitePlagiarism CheckerDealDetectDeter(Brett, 2009 as cited inShenton, 2012)(Byrne, 2008)
  9. 9. Responsible use of informationThe first thing teachersneed to learn is tounderstand why plagiarismhappens.(Wilson, 2006)Teachers can encourage higher-order thinking, use pathfinders, credit thereference section, talk about plagiarism and the consequences, teachbibliographic skills. (Wilson, 2006)
  10. 10. Classroom StrategiesPrimary teachers can: discuss intellectual property discuss giving credit to authors use the term plagiarism teach note taking and referencingGive students time to learn the skills!(Mitchell, 2007)
  11. 11. School policy developmentPersuasion is not enough toeliminate plagiarism. Talkabout what plagiarismmeans and what theconsequences may be.(Stolley, Brizee &Paiz, 2013)Consider:• The school ethos• Building strong moral growth• The cultural background of students• The school curriculum as a teaching and learning platform(Shenton, 2012, Stolley, Brizee & Paiz, 2013)
  12. 12. Conclusion Suggested Readings1. Do digital citizens become effective lifelong learners if theirinformation literacy skills fail to include best practice in avoidingplagiarism?2. How do you foster colleague support in developing a policy whichencourages teaching and assessment of bibliographic skills?3. How would a school policy recognise cultural differences inknowledge and understanding of plagiarism?• Ma, H.J., Wan, G., & Lu, E.Y. (2008). Digital cheating and plagiarism in schools. Theory Into Practice, 47(3), 197-203.• Mitchell, S. (2007). Penguins and plagiarism: stemming the tide of plagiarism in elementary school. Library MediaConnection, 25(7), 47.• Shenton, A.K. (2012). Plagiarism: a nettle that schools must grasp. Education Journal, 133(7), 10-14.• Wilson, D. (2006). Crime or confusion – why do students plagiarise? Retrieved 7 April 2013 fromhttp://www2.curriculum.edu.au/scis/connections/issue_60/crime_or_confusion_-_why_do_students_plagiarise.html
  13. 13. Referencesbeyondtheclassroom.wikidot.com (n.d.). Retrieved 23 April 2013 from http://www.google.com.au/searchBoard of Studies. (2011). HSC: All my own work: plagiarism. Retrieved 7 April 2013 fromhttp://amow.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/module3/module3s1.htmlBoard of Studies NSW. (2006). Retrieved 12 April 2013 fromhttp://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/butifandthat.com (n.d). Clipped 23 April 2013 from http://www.google.com.au/searchByrne, R. (2008). Free technology for teachers. Retrieved 9 April 2013 fromhttp://ww.freetech4teachers.com/2008/12/ten-resources-for-preventing-and.htmlCombes B. (2004). The culture of information usage, plagiarism and the emerging Net Generation.Research…, Reform…, Realise the potential! Proceedings of the Australian Computers inEducation Conference (ACEC), Adelaide, South Australia.e-geress.org (n.d.). Retrieved 21 April 2013 from http://www.google.com.au/searchfacebook.com (n.d.). Retrieved 20 April 2013 from http://www.google.com.au/searchFive types of plagiarism. (n.d.). Retrieved 7 April 2013 fromwww.lib.ncsu.edu/lobo/lessonplans/14_fivetypes.docLawson, A. (2004). Kids learn it’s wrong to copy off net. Retrieved 9 April 2013 fromhttp://www.smh.com.au/news/National/Kids-learn-its-wrong-to-copy-offnet/2004/11/20/1100838276613.html
  14. 14. ReferencesMa, H.J., Wan, G., & Lu, E.Y. (2008). Digital cheating and plagiarism in schools. Theory IntoPractice, 47(3), 197-203.maternalfocus.com (n.d.). Retrieved 22 April 2013 from http://www.google.com.au/searchMitchell, S. (2007). Penguins and plagiarism: stemming the tide of plagiarism in elementaryschool. Library Media Connection, 25(7), 47.Oxford Dictionaries. (2013). Retrieved 7 April 2013 fromhttp://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/plagiarismPanse, S. (n.d.). Ways to avoid plagiarism. Retrieved 9 April 2013 fromhttp://www.buzzle.com/articles/ways-to-avoid-plagiarism.htmlShenton, A.K. (2012). Plagiarism: a nettle that schools must grasp. Education Journal, 133(7),10-14.Stolley, K., Brizee, A., Paiz, J.M. (2013). Developing a strong course policy on plagiarism.Retrieved 9 April 2013 from http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/05/Wilson, D. (2006). Crime or confusion – why do students plagiarise? Retrieved 7 April 2013from http://www2.curriculum.edu.au/scis/connections/issue_60/crime_or_confusion_-_why_do_students_plagiarise.html

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