Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
How to deliver relevant social media content graphic
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

How to deliver relevant social media content graphic

64

Published on

How to deliver relevant social media content

How to deliver relevant social media content

Published in: Marketing
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
64
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. How to Deliver Relevant Social Media Content                                                                                Before you post anything, put on the following hats:  Corporate or Marketing Strategy    What strategy is this post is tied to? In your attempt to grab any content, are you going to talk about a product that is in end‐of‐life mode – or are you going to talk about a product targeted to  grow 30% in the coming year? If your social media efforts can be tied to a specific strategy, marketing activity, and market segment – you’ll be much more likely to maintain the support of the  C‐suite team, especially when you can introduce some level of metrics proving effectiveness.  Market Segment    While some posts can be generic or for all audiences, the best way to start thinking  relevancy is to target a specific market segment. This will set you on the right path for  creating relative content that will have value.  Market Role    To be even more relevant, target a specific role for the content (engineer, VP of Finance,  etc.). Who specifically in the target segment’s organization is this post meant for?  Identifying a role will help with the following step as well.  Customer Acquisition, Retention or Development    Next think about the purpose of the post. Is it intended to generate a lead, keep a current  customer up to speed, or to move a customer to another level? Most posts will fall into one of  these categories.    Legal:  Are you going to get into any legal  trouble with this post? Example:  Before you “like” a customer’s  maintenance tip, make sure it doesn’t  take your product out of warranty.    IP:  Are you mistakenly sharing intellectual  property? Example: Before you post a  picture of an employee on the factory  floor, check the background of the  picture to make sure you’re not sharing  any proprietary information like a  custom jig or whiteboard with process  information on it.    Branding:  Does this post support the brand and  move it forward? Your company’s  brand should always be top of mind in  everything you do – each social media  post should be no different.    Competitive:  How will the competition react to this  post? You know all your competitors  are following you so make sure you’re  not giving them tons of low hanging  fruit to copy or leverage. With that  said, don’t over think this. You’ve  already put your IP hat on, so you  should be OK. 

×