Skills January 2010
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Skills January 2010

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One-day interactive workshop designed and delievered in London to an audience of Owner/Founders from SMEs, departmental heads from public sector organisations and two individuals from charities. The ...

One-day interactive workshop designed and delievered in London to an audience of Owner/Founders from SMEs, departmental heads from public sector organisations and two individuals from charities. The session covered the recent developments regarding skills in the UK, from the perspective of organisations both encountering skills shortages and skills surpluses.

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Skills January 2010 Skills January 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Skills-shortage or surplus?
    by Fluid
    January 2010
  • Contents
    3-4 Introduction to Fluid
    5-7 Leitch review
    8-9 Exercise A
    10-11 Top 10 difficult positions to fill
    12-13 Main causes of skills gaps
    14-16 Main skills lacking where skills shortage vacancies were identified
    17-19 Global talent shortage
    20-21Literacy and numeracy
    22-23 Soft skills
    24-25 Government initiatives
    26-31 Sector Skills Councils
    32-33 Providers, funders and awarding bodies
    34-35 Key Government departments
    36-37 Skills Pledge
    38-39 Apprenticeships
    40-41 Diplomas
    42-43 National Skills Academy
    44-45Train to Gain
    46-47 Case studies
    48-49 Exercise B
    50-51 Conclusion and questions
  • Page 3
    Introduction
  • Page 4
    Introduction to Fluid
    Fluid Consulting Limited (Fluid) is a specialist human resources consultancy headed by Tim Holden MCIPD
    10 years in banking
    10 years in Human Resources consultancy
    Fluid trading since 2006
    The core services provided by Fluid are:
    • Retention
    • Selection
    - Attraction
    - Remuneration & Reward
    - Outplacement
    - Training & HR consultancy
  • Page 5
    Leitch review
  • Page 6
    Leitch review 1 of 2
    • Strengthen employer voice
    • Increased employee engagement and investment in skills
    • Expand skills brokerage services
    • Route all adult vocational skills funding through Train to Gain and Learner Accounts by 2010
    • Improved higher level skills
    • World Class intermediate skills
  • Page 7
    Leitch review 2 of 2
    • Increase employer investment in Level 3, 4 and above qualifications in the workplace
    • Increase people’s aspirations and awareness of the value of skills to them and their families
    • Create a new integrated employment and skills system to increase sustainable employment and progression
    • Develop a nationwide network of local employment and skills boards
  • Page 8
    Exercise A
  • Page 9
    Exercise A
  • Page 10
    Top 10 difficult positions to fill
  • Page 11
    • Skilled manual trades
    • Labourers
    • Chefs/cooks
    • Engineers
    • Admin assistants and PAs
    • Nurses
    • Management/executives
    • Sales representatives
    • IT staff
    • Drivers
    Top 10 difficult positions to fill
  • Page 12
    Main causes of skills gaps
  • Page 13
    • Lack of experience/recently recruited
    • Employees lack motivation
    • Failure to train and develop
    • Inability to keep up with change
    • Recruitment problems
    • High staff turnover
    Main causes of skills gaps
  • Page 14
    Main skills lacking where skills shortage vacancies were identified
  • Page 15
    • Technical or practical skills
    • Oral communication skills
    • Customer-handling skills
    • Problem-solving skills
    • Team working skills
    • Written communication skills
    Main skills lacking where skills shortage vacancies were identified 1 of 2
  • Page 16
    • Management skills
    • Literacy
    • Numeracy
    • Office/administrative skills
    • IT professional skills
    • Foreign language skills
    • General IT skills
    Main skills lacking where skills shortage vacancies were identified 2 of 2
  • Page 17
    Global talent shortage
  • Page 18
    • CAUSES
    • Changing demographics
    • Global competition
    • Shifting skills requirements
    • Poor or ineffectual training
    Global talent shortage 1 of 2
  • Page 19
    • HOW CAN IT BE RESOLVED?
    • Better workforce planning
    • Increased training and development
    • Greater use of migrant workers
    • Tapping into underused recruitment pools
    • Better qualifications and more vocational training
    Global talent shortage 2 of 2
  • Page 20
    Literacy and numeracy
  • Page 21
    • 6.8M people aren’t functionally literate
    • 5M people in the UK have serious difficulty with numbers
    • 38% of Jobcentre Plus customers lack functional literacy
    • 45% of Jobcentre Plus customers lack functional numeracy
    Literacy and numeracy
  • Page 22
    Soft skills
  • Page 23
    Soft skills
    • Think past the traditional approach to appraisals
    • Get feedback from customers and clients
    • Involve employees in the design of their appraisals
    • Have a conversation with people about the objectives of the organisation
  • Page 24
    Government initiatives
  • Page 25
    Government initiatives
    • Increase in the number of apprentices
    • Diplomas
    • Train to Gain
    • The Skills Pledge
    • Manager’s observation
    • Behaviour reinforcement
  • Page 26
    Sector Skills Councils
  • Page 27
    Sector Skills Councils 1 of 5
    • ASSET SKILLS, assetskills.org, 888000 people
    • property, housing, cleaning services and facilities management
    • AUTOMOTIVE SKILLS, automotiveskills.org.uk, 521000 people
    • retail motor industry
    • COGENT, cogent-ssc.com, 422000 people
    • chemicals, pharmaceutical, nuclear, oil & gas, polymer
    • CONSTRUCTION, cskills.org, 1780000 people
    • construction
    • CREATIVE & CULTURAL SKILLS, ccskills.org.uk, 349000 people
    • advertising, crafts, cultural heritage, design, music, performing, literary and visual arts
  • Page 28
    Sector Skills Councils 2 of 5
    • E-SKILLS UK, e-skills.com, 804000 people
    • IT and telecoms
    • ENERGY & UTILITY SKILLS, euskills.co.uk, 261000 people
    • electricity, gas, water and waste management
    • FINANCIAL SERVICES SKILLS COUNCIL, fssc.org.uk, 1020000 people
    • financial services
    • GOSKILLS, goskills.org, 577000 people
    • passenger transport
    • GOVERNMENT SKILLS, government-skills.gov.uk, 937000 people
    • central government
  • Page 29
    Sector Skills Councils 3 of 5
    • IMPROVE, improveltd.co.uk, 370000 people
    • food and drink
    • LANTRA, lantra.co.uk, 342000 people
    • environmental and land-based industries
    • LIFELONG LEARNING UK, lluk.org, 823000 people
    • education, community learning, libraries, work-based learning & development, archives and information services
    • PEOPLEFIRST, people1st.co.uk, 1874000 people
    • hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism
    • PROSKILLS UK, proskills.co.uk, 371000 people
    • process & manufacturing in building products, coatings, glass, printing, extractive industries and mineral processing
  • Page 30
    • SEMTA, semta.org.uk, 1208000 people
    • science, engineering and manufacturing technologies
    • SKILLFAST-UK, skillfast-uk.org, 256000 people
    • fashion and textiles
    • SKILLS FOR CARE AND DEVELOPMENT, skillsforcareanddevelopment.org.uk, 967000 people
    • social care, children, early years and young people
    • SKILLS FOR HEALTH, skillsforhealth.org.uk, 1730000 people
    • health sector
    • SKILLS FOR JUSTICE, skillsforjustice.com, 292000 people
    • Policing & law enforcement, youth justice, custodial care, community justice, courts service, prosecution service and forensic science
    Sector Skills Councils 4 of 5
  • Page 31
    • SKILLS FOR LOGISTICS, skillsforlogistics.org, 684000 people
    • freight logistics and wholesaling industry
    • SKILLSACTIVE, skillsactive.com, 302000 people
    • sport, recreation, health, fitness and the caravan industry
    • SKILLSET, skillset.org, 213000 people
    • broadcast, film, video, interactive media and photo imaging
    • SKILLSMART RETAIL, skillsmartretail.com, 2639000 people
    • retail
    • SUMMITSKILLS, summitskills.org.uk, 381000 people
    • building services engineering
    Sector Skills Councils 5 of 5
  • Page 32
    Providers, funders and awarding bodies
  • Page 33
    Providers, funders and awarding bodies
    • Higher Education Institutions
    • Further Education providers
    • Schools
    • Private training providers
  • Page 34
    Key Government departments
  • Page 35
    Key Government departments
    • DIUS
    • DCSF
    • BERR
    • DWP
  • Page 36
    Skills Pledge
  • Page 37
    Skills Pledge
    • Voluntary, public commitment
    • Access to Train to Gain
    • Leitch review
  • Page 38
    Apprenticeships
  • Page 39
    Apprenticeships
    • 200 types across 80 sectors
    • Owned by employers
    • Bring a competitive edge, higher productivity, improved quality of work, reduced costs, increased employee satisfaction, strong employee career progression and a more diverse workforce
  • Page 40
    Diplomas
  • Page 41
    Diplomas
    • New qualification from 2008 for 14-19 year olds combining theoretical study with practical experience, helping develop skills highly valued by employers and universities
    • Input from over 5000 employers
    • Cover 17 disciplines
    • Available at three levels-Foundation, Higher and Advanced
  • Page 42
    National Skills Academy
  • Page 43
    National Skills Academy
    • Network of employer-led world-class centres of excellence, delivering the skills required by each sector of the economy
    • Employers take control of the design and delivery of learning in their industry, working in partnership with Government and training providers
  • Page 5
    Train to Gain
  • Page 6
    Train to Gain
    • Key recommendation of the Leitch review
    • Provides impartial, independent advice on training to organisations across England
    • Improved productivity and competitiveness
    • Skills broker carries out needs analysis
    • Primary target has been ‘hard to reach’ employers
  • Page 5
    Case studies
  • Page 6
    Case studies
  • Page 5
    Exercise B
  • Page 6
    Exercise B
  • Page 43
    Conclusion & Questions
  • Page 44
    Conclusion
    Summary
    Questions