THE WHEEL SPEAKS ON 2013 – Realistic Explicit Statistics?
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THE WHEEL SPEAKS ON 2013 – Realistic Explicit Statistics?

THE WHEEL SPEAKS ON 2013 – Realistic Explicit Statistics?

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    THE WHEEL SPEAKS ON 2013 – Realistic Explicit Statistics? THE WHEEL SPEAKS ON 2013 – Realistic Explicit Statistics? Document Transcript

    •   1     THE  WHEEL  SPEAKS  ON  2013  –  Realistic  Explicit  Statistics?     Statistics  don't  necessarily  tell  you  everything  in  particularly  when  we  assess   problematic  issues  that  effect  society  such  as  crime  and  drugs.  For  instance  the   number  of  people  incarcerated  in  this  country  in  particularly  the  lopsided  statistics   when  it  comes  down  to  a  percentage  of  African  American  people  incarcerated.   Although  it’s  a  known  fact  that  has  been  spoken  of  for  decades  it  seems  to  again  be   resurfacing  when  it  comes  down  to  the  way  across  the  country  major  cities  are   beginning  to  corral  or  run  up  the  youth  throughout  urban  communities.       Cities  are  transitioned  and  when  I  speak  of  transitioning  I  am  specifically  saying  it’s   a  process  or  a  period  of  changing  from  one  state  or  condition  to  another.  Sometimes   the  transition  is  smooth  and  at  times  the  transition  can  be  rough  and  all  don’t  buy  in   or  see  the  directive  or  simply  see  nothing  to  gain  in  the  transitioning  progress.   Promises  are  made  and  promises  are  broken  and  people  will  be  forgotten  as  well   and  sadly  there  will  be  those  who  even  until  the  reality  kicks  them  in  the  ass  still   won’t  get  it.  And  although  it  may  be  necessary  to  use  methods  that  may  seem   extreme  like  having  stings  or  raids  to  remove  certain  individuals  who  have  been   reclassified  as  undesirable  it  should  be  recognized  that  many  have  never  had   exposure  to  anything  in  these  same  communities  in  which  was  created  for  those   who  may  have  even  aspired  to  be  anything?        
    •   2   I  remember  programs  being  snatched  from  the  inner  cities  trades  being  non  existent   and  eventually  the  flood  gates  opening  within  correctional  facilities  all  around  the   country.       Cattle  is  a  classic  example  of  how  communities  are  migrated  and  kept  together  but   not  all  livestock  is  considered  to  be  domesticable  and  before  those  who  will  take   offense  to  the  comparison  try  to  overlook  the  real  issue  I’ll  go  further  with  what  is  of   course  a  personal  assessment.       I  come  from  a  city  like  so  many  throughout  the  United  States  presently  where   exclusivity  in  the  last  decade  especially  has  become  part  of  the  culture  and  many   people  have  been  programmed  not  to  expect  fair  bipartisan  treatment  and  for  years   consistently  haven’t.     Cities  are  being  run  as  if  they’re  monarchies  and  it’s  assume  to  be  to  ones  advantage   if  you’re  compliance  is  public  knowledge  and  is  considered  detrimental  if  one  has  an   opinion.  And  with  that  being  fact  many  remain  quiet  and  detach  to  what  happens  in   their  own  communities  and  in  particularly  how  ones  community  can  be  simply   ignored  for  decades.     Young  men  have  been  ignored  for  decades  and  the  percentages  and  numbers   confirm  that  although  one  would  love  to  say  as  a  people  we’ve  progressed  the   freedom  of  an  African  American  young  male  seems  to  be  short  lived,  and  the   numbers  support  the  assertion.     Sophia  Kerby  wrote  an  article  for  the  Center  of  American  Progress  in  March  of  2012   entitle  The  Top  10  Most  Startling  Facts  About  People  of  Color  and  Criminal  Justice  in   the  United  States  A  Look  at  the  Racial  Disparities  Inherent  in  Our  Nation’s  Criminal-­‐ Justice  System  (see  mention  article   http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/race/news/2012/03/13/11351/the-­‐top-­‐10-­‐most-­‐startling-­‐ facts-­‐about-­‐people-­‐of-­‐color-­‐and-­‐criminal-­‐justice-­‐in-­‐the-­‐united-­‐states/  )    
    •   3         While  people  of  color  make  up  about  30  percent  of  the  United  States’  population,  they   account  for  60  percent  of  those  imprisoned.  The  prison  population  grew  by  700   percent  from  1970  to  2005,  a  rate  that  is  outpacing  crime  and  population  rates.  The   incarceration  rates  disproportionately  impact  men  of  color:  1  in  every  15  African   American  men  and  1  in  every  36  Hispanic  men  are  incarcerated  in  comparison  to  1  in   every  106  white  men.     The  article  also  makes  it  crystal  clear  with  statistics  to  support  the  facts:     According  to  the  Bureau  of  Justice  Statistics,  one  in  three  black  men  can  expect  to  go  to   prison  in  their  lifetime.  Individuals  of  color  have  a  disproportionate  number  of   encounters  with  law  enforcement,  indicating  that  racial  profiling  continues  to  be  a   problem.  A  report  by  the  Department  of  Justice  found  that  blacks  and  Hispanics  were   approximately  three  times  more  likely  to  be  searched  during  a  traffic  stop  than  white   motorists.  African  Americans  were  twice  as  likely  to  be  arrested  and  almost  four  times   as  likely  to  experience  the  use  of  force  during  encounters  with  the  police.     Yet  many  prominent  African  American  high-­‐ranking  officials  working  comfortably   within  city  government  and  councils  seem  to  be  more  consume  with  finding  the   wrong  alternatives.  Re-­‐establishing  programs  which  for  decades  may  have  been   vital  to  the  nurturing  many  of  the  youth  in  my  generation  truthfully  may  not  be  of   significance  at  all  society  has  change  forever  and  yesterday  can  not  be  recaptured  or   relived.    
    •   4   It’s  time  to  cut  it  out  with  all  the  romanticizing  about  how  it  use  to  be  and  back  in   the  days  because  it’s  simply  a  dream  that  we  live  with  that  as  the  years  go  by  has   deteriorated  into  a  nightmare.       Honestly  let  think  rationally  and  truthfully  for  a  minute  here  back  to  when   especially  many  in  my  age  bracket  were  teenagers.  We  literally  every  single  dude  I   knew  played  basketball  or  football  or  baseball  depending  on  the  season  from  sun  up   until  sundown  am  I  right?  The  parks  playgrounds  or  any  pace  there  may  have  been  a   hoop  would  be  packed  all  damn  day  all  of  us  waiting  for  winners  or  next  patiently  no   fights  argument  were  few  waiting  our  turn  to  ball  and  if  we  lost  doing  it  over  and   over  the  entire  day  into  the  evening  until  the  sun  would  set.  Now  here’s  the  question   how  many  of  us  right  now  actually  even  could  envision  this  happening  again  in   these  times?  These  times  where  forget  about  the  fact  that  the  parks  are  few  of   course  or  haven’t  been  maintain  for  decades?  But  if  you’re  around  a  teenager  these   days  or  expose  to  the  streets  when  was  the  last  time  you  even  saw  a  kid  actually   excited  about  leaving  an  Ipod  Ipad  or  Iphone  alone  long  enough  to  develop  an   interest  for  anything?  There  are  those  who  exist  that  have  passion  for  the  same   things  we  once  had  but  the  consensus  would  not  be  in  agreement  if  we  ask  this   question  to  who  is  important  and  that’s  the  young  male  themselves?       (The  below  information  is  courtesy  of  the  NAACP.org  http://www.naacp.org/pages/criminal-­‐justice-­‐fact-­‐sheet  )     CRIMINAL  JUSTICE  FACT  SHEET   Incarceration  Trends  in  America     From  1980  to  2008,  the  number  of  people  incarcerated  in  America  quadrupled-­‐from   roughly  500,000  to  2.3  million  people   Today,  the  US  is  5%  of  the  World  population  and  has  25%  of  world  prisoners.   Combining  the  number  of  people  in  prison  and  jail  with  those  under  parole  or   probation  supervision,  1  in  ever  y  31  adults,  or  3.2  percent  of  the  population  is   under  some  form  of  correctional  control     Racial  Disparities  in  Incarceration     African  Americans  now  constitute  nearly  1  million  of  the  total  2.3  million   incarcerated  population   African  Americans  are  incarcerated  at  nearly  six  times  the  rate  of  whites   Together,  African  American  and  Hispanics  comprised  58%  of  all  prisoners  in  2008,   even  though  African  Americans  and  Hispanics  make  up  approximately  one  quarter   of  the  US  population   According  to  Unlocking  America,  if  African  American  and  Hispanics  were   incarcerated  at  the  same  rates  of  whites,  today's  prison  and  jail  populations  would   decline  by  approximately  50%    
    •   5   One  in  six  black  men  had  been  incarcerated  as  of  2001.  If  current  trends  continue,   one  in  three  black  males  born  today  can  expect  to  spend  time  in  prison  during  his   lifetime   1  in  100  African  American  women  are  in  prison   Nationwide,  African-­‐Americans  represent  26%  of  juvenile  arrests,  44%  of  youth   who  are  detained,  46%  of  the  youth  who  are  judicially  waived  to  criminal  court,  and   58%  of  the  youth  admitted  to  state  prisons  (Center  on  Juvenile  and  Criminal   Justice).             Drug  Sentencing  Disparities     About  14  million  Whites  and  2.6  million  African  Americans  report  using  an  illicit   drug   5  times  as  many  Whites  are  using  drugs  as  African  Americans,  yet  African  Americans   are  sent  to  prison  for  drug  offenses  at  10  times  the  rate  of  Whites   African  Americans  represent  12%  of  the  total  population  of  drug  users,  but  38%  of   those  arrested  for  drug  offenses,  and  59%  of  those  in  state  prison  for  a  drug  offense.   African  Americans  serve  virtually  as  much  time  in  prison  for  a  drug  offense  (58.7   months)  as  whites  do  for  a  violent  offense  (61.7  months).  (Sentencing  Project)     Contributing  Factors     Inner  city  crime  prompted  by  social  and  economic  isolation   Crime/drug  arrest  rates:  African  Americans  represent  12%  of  monthly  drug  users,   but  comprise  32%  of  persons  arrested  for  drug  possession   "Get  tough  on  crime"  and  "war  on  drugs"  policies   Mandatory  minimum  sentencing,  especially  disparities  in  sentencing  for  crack  and   powder  cocaine  possession    
    •   6   In  2002,  blacks  constituted  more  than  80%  of  the  people  sentenced  under  the   federal  crack  cocaine  laws  and  served  substantially  more  time  in  prison  for  drug   offenses  than  did  whites,  despite  that  fact  that  more  than  2/3  of  crack  cocaine  users   in  the  U.S.  are  white  or  Hispanic     "Three  Strikes"/habitual  offender  policies   Zero  Tolerance  policies  as  a  result  of  perceived  problems  of  school  violence;  adverse   affect  on  black  children.   35%  of  black  children  grades  7-­‐12  have  been  suspended  or  expelled  at  some  point   in  their  school  careers  compared  to  20%  of  Hispanics  and  15%  of  whites       Effects  of  Incarceration     Jail  reduces  work  time  of  young  people  over  the  next  decade  by  25-­‐30  percent  when   compared  with  arrested  youths  who  were  not  incarcerated   Jails  and  prisons  are  recognized  as  settings  where  society's  infectious  diseases  are   highly  concentrated   Prison  has  not  been  proven  as  a  rehabilitation  for  behavior,  as  two-­‐thirds  of   prisoners  will  reoffend     Exorbitant  Cost  of  Incarceration:  Is  it  Worth  It?     About  $70  billion  dollars  are  spent  on  corrections  yearly   Prisons  and  jails  consume  a  growing  portion  of  the  nearly  $200  billion  we  spend   annually  on  public  safety.           (Statistics  may  also  be  track  via  the  Bureau  Of  Justice   http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=11  )  
    •   7           And  once  again  referencing  Sophia  Kerby’s  article:     Theses  racial  disparities  have  deprived  people  of  color  of  their  most  basic  civil  rights,   making  criminal-­‐justice  reform  the  civil  rights  issue  of  our  time.  Through  mass   imprisonment  and  the  overrepresentation  of  individuals  of  color  within  the  criminal   justice  and  prison  system,  people  of  color  have  experienced  an  adverse  impact  on   themselves  and  on  their  communities  from  barriers  to  reintegrating  into  society  to   engaging  in  the  democratic  process.  Eliminating  the  racial  disparities  inherent  to  our   nation’s  criminal-­‐justice  policies  and  practices  must  be  at  the  heart  of  a  renewed,   refocused,  and  reenergized  movement  for  racial  justice  in  America.     I  sat  in  a  meeting  last  year  in  my  hometown  listening  to  architects  who  ran  to  the   door  after  a  presentation  and  a  few  individuals  at  that  time  just  really  there  to   receive  votes.  The  meeting  was  about  a  public  park  about  to  be  constructed  and  still   over  and  over  again  people  were  speaking  about  baseball  fields  and  football  fields  or   basketball  courts  when  they  don’t  even  maintain  the  ones  existent  right  now.  I  stood   and  spoke  about  the  arts  computer  training  learning  a  trade  or  even  PSAT  training   and  preparation  and  constructing  something  that  would  be  utilized  to  the  fullest.   There  comes  a  time  when  instead  of  waiting  for  someone  to  throw  us  a  bone  the   time  has  come  for  us  to  collectively  nourish  our  own  bones  to  what  we  can  not  to  be   in  this  same  pathetic  position  20  years  from  now  all  over  again  across  the  nation.  If   we  don’t  demand  training  if  we  don’t  demand  jobs  and  if  we  don’t  cultivate  our   intuitive  thirst  by  stepping  outside  of  these  personal  jails  many  of  us  have  allowed   to  be  built  around  us  speaking  metaphorically  we’ll  never  be  free.  And  whether  or   not  it’s  realistic  explicit  or  a  statistic  won’t  be  important  at  all  because  truthfully   we’ve  got  this  thing  entirely  twisted.       Don’t  ever  assume  that  although  you  may  feel  as  if  you’re  bless  that  accountability   excludes  any  of  us  and  I  hated  basketball  when  I  was  a  kid  but  there  was  nothing   else  to  do  so  I  played.  Imagine  what  the  African  American  or  Latino  kids  today  might   feel  like  especially  when  some  people  always  seem  truthfully  like  the  first   alternative  is  always  to  stereotypically  assume  they  want  to  run  or  caught  a  damn   sport.  Learning  a  trade  now  may  save  a  life  tomorrow  or  especially  twenty  years   from  now.     Respectfully,   THE  WHEEL  SPEAKS  ON  2013     (The  Way  Humanity/Hudson  Expects  Everyone  to  Live)