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Childabuse Assistance Strategies
 

Childabuse Assistance Strategies

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This powerpoint was for a subject i did in 2008, based around how to identify children crying out for help after they have been abused in a number of different ways.

This powerpoint was for a subject i did in 2008, based around how to identify children crying out for help after they have been abused in a number of different ways.

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  • Child abuse and neglect is generally classified into one of four categories': Physical abuse Sexual abuse Emotional abuse Neglect Many children who are victims of abuse are victims of more than one type of abuse. The negative effects of child abuse and neglect are likely to be compounded as the number of risk Factors increases. (AIHW, May ’05) Every year, nearly 1,400 cases of fatal child abuse are reported in the U.S. Recent information from investigators of child fatality records suggests that the actual number of children killed by their caregivers may be much, much larger. (Kagan, 1998, pp139)
  • A consuming interest in sex: Children who have been sexually abused can be interested in sex long before their peers, use it in role play such as ‘doctors and nurses’ , they may also explore other children through play. Problems with sexual Identity: Some children who have been abused sexually may worry that they are gay, straight, bisexual or are confused about which they are. Problems with sexual identity don’t usually become a problem until the children get to puberty or early teens, but can mean the child explores more than a child who has not been abused. Withdrawal from friends and family members: Abuse of children tends to make the child withdraw from friends and family members, the abuse may also make the child very nervous around adult males/females they do not know well and therefore they do not socialise very well with others who are unknown to them. Difficulty trusting other people: Children who have been abused generally have great difficulty trusting adults or people older than them because their trust has already been betrayed excessively and therefore are very guarded in who they talk to and what about. Feelings of guilt or responsibility: Children who have been abused in any respect will have feelings of guilt that maybe they could have Stopped the abuse, made the person go away, taken the abusers ability away to abuse. They generally will feel responsible for the abuse that they caused it and possibly that they were asking for it. Post traumatic stress syndrome: Post traumatic stress is a very real possibility given the circumstances that some children are expected to put up with and live through. PTSD can be dealt with given the right support but most children who do live with PTSD are not diagnosed within their childhood, sometimes not even in their lifetime. Feelings of extreme anger: Children who have been abused in any way generally harbor feelings of anger and frustration which comes from their feelings of betrayal that they were not protected by the people that should have been protecting them. The child may act out towards others or they may internalise their anger and hurt themselves (cutting, nail biting etc). Please Note: This information is based on my own experiences as a child after I was abused by an uncle when I was 8 years old. In answer to your no doubt wondering mind, yes I have felt most of these emotions and feelings at one point or another. Stacy Martin
  • Low self esteem/A sense of sadness or depression (Low energy/ withdrawal): Children who have been through abuse of any type tend to experience low self esteem and are sometimes prone to depression, which may be brought on at the time of the abuse. Depression may be brought on at some other time in the future by something completely unrelated to the initial abuse. Withdrawal from friends and family members is also another behaviour which can become quite a significant behaviour problem as the child grows up and may still be quite shy. Clinging behaviour: Generally happens with children under the age of 10, and a lot of the time wont say why they are clingy but will just cry until they get what they want. Sudden change in school performance: Children who are victims of abuse may change their performance as a way of crying out for help, this may also be as a result of low self esteem and not wanting to draw attention to themselves for fear of it happening again or more frequently. Regressive behaviours: Some children who have been victims of abuse do regress in their behaviour patterns and begin to exhibit behaviours they used to show when they were younger and had since grown out of. But in saying that not all children who regress have been abused and some do regress because of other reasons which can include autism, stress, depression or psychological disorders to name a few. Overly compliant behaviour at home or school: Some children who have been abused become overly compliant at home or school or both, rather than acting out they take everything that is thrown at them without argument and say nothing about their treatment. Please Note: This information is based on my own experiences as a child after I was abused by an uncle when I was 8 years old. In answer to your no doubt wondering mind, yes I have felt most of these emotions and feelings at one point or another. Stacy Martin
  • Feelings of powerlessness: Children experience feelings of powerlessness if the abuse continues beyond once or twice because they realise they cannot stop the abuse. (Kinnear, 1995, p36) Feelings of being unloved, worthless and unsafe: Children often feel completely unsafe and their self esteem goes down hill very quickly, because of the many and varied emotions and not being able to understand what happened and why it happened to them. (Kinnear, 1995, p38) Male victims of abuse especially sexual abuse worry that the abuse means they are no longer an adequate man and feel the need to prove themselves searching for wealth, recognition and power. Not being male I don’t understand a male point of view on this topic but what I do know is that abuse is power, if the abuser knows they have power over their victim they win, they can do as they please and who is going to stop them if the victim feels they are powerless. (Kinnear, 1995, p39) Please Note: This information is based on my own experiences as a child after I was abused by an uncle when I was 8 years old. In answer to your no doubt wondering mind, yes I have felt most of these emotions and feelings at one point or another. Stacy Martin
  • Parents who abuse their own children have very little understanding about childhood development and about childhood capabilities. Children under the age of 4 years develop at their own rate and no matter how much a parent nags and abuses their child they will not learn any faster than they are able to do so. Poverty is a major socio-economic problem in some areas of the country and given that stress is caused by poverty and it often very difficult to get out of the cycle of living on a week to week basis. But in saying that not all parents who have very little money abuse their children so for parents who deal with stress in an abusive manner chances are it will happen no matter how relaxed and unstressed they are. Physical Crowding of a home environment means that the children are expected to do exactly as they are told when they are told and they do not argue. If they do play up their punishment will not doubt be so severe it would make any person who has a reasonable sense of discipline feel they have to step in and do something to protect the child. Given the way society is today people are not likely to step in and say anything even when in past years someone would have stepped in. Lack of social support for parent(s) : Parents who have no support from friends, family members or anyone else find it extremely difficult to keep their temper under control. Lack of support to the parents means abuse is more likely because there may be no one to help with the care of children and no one to question the use of severe discipline.
  • Parent(s) are more likely to be younger than the average parent: Parents who are younger than the average parent don’t always handle the stress and pressure of being a parent very well and their temper may very well flare and the child will be the one to cop the brunt of their temper. More likely to be single parents: Parents who abuse their children are more likely to be single because they don’t have anyone else to look after the children and are not able to take a break and have some time to themselves to rest and recharge Use of drugs and alcohol: Parents who use drugs and alcohol tend to have very short fuses especially when children play up and need to disciplined. Depression: (Kagan, 1998, p141)
  • Being a teacher within a school we have a duty of care to the children to ensure they are cared for and looked after to the best of the parents/carers abilities. It is up to us to look out for warning signs and cries for help to ensure that children are able to live their childhood and don’t need to grow up too soon. 1. Strategy one says that as the child’s teacher you are the one they talk to, no one else, the parents may know about the situation but by the same token they may not know if they don’t wish to be involved and ensure their child is looked after to the full extent of a parents ability. 2. Strategy two says that you suggest to the parents that they take the child to get professional help other than at the school and you provide no other support at all. 3. As the child’s teacher providing support and being someone for the parents and children to talk to is a good part of the job. It is always a good idea to suggest to the parents that the child be taken to professionals to help them deal with this situation and understand that it is not their fault and they did nothing wrong.
  • Telling someone else about a personal experience of being sexually abused is one of the most difficult things to do and shows a great deal of trust.  This is a compliment to you because you have obviously made your friend feel safe enough to do so.  It may also make you feel a bit uncomfortable! You may feel that it is too difficult for you to talk about or you don't know what to say. Some of the following points suggest ways that you can support someone who has disclosed sexual abuse and also support yourself. Make it clear that you believe the survivor and listen. Don't expect the child to tell you everything about the experience to prove that it is true. Acknowledge what has happened, and the feelings associated with it.
  • Don't ask prying questions out of curiosity but as much as possible show care, support and interest.  Listening may be the best thing you can do. Encourage your friend to get support to help with the feelings and what is happening.
  • Be open to helping in any way your friend wishes, do not pressure. Do not expect any particular behaviour from her, different people deal with things in different ways. Don't make judgements or support the abuser.
  • Don't put pressure on yourself thinking that you must come up with all the answers for your friend's complex issues. Sometimes just simple solutions and ideas can help the most. Reassure your friend that surviving a huge trauma means that he/she must have great courage. http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetails.aspx?p=240&np=296&id=2026#7

Childabuse Assistance Strategies Childabuse Assistance Strategies Presentation Transcript

  • Identify and assist students to succeed who are at risk because of abuse. Child abuse is defined as: All forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, maltreatment or exploitation including sexual abuse. (Child Protection Policy, 2008.)
  • Behaviours exhibited by children affected by Abuse.
    • A consuming interest in sex.
    • Problems with sexual identity.
    • Withdrawal from friends and family members.
    • Difficulty trusting other people.
    • Feelings of guilt or responsibility
        • (Kinnear, 1995, p36)
    • Post traumatic stress syndrome
      • (Kagan, 1998, p144)
    • Feelings of extreme anger.
      • (Kagan, 1998, p142)
  • Behaviours exhibited by children affected by Abuse.
    • Low self esteem.
    • Clinging behaviour.
    • A sense of sadness or depression.
      • Low energy/ withdrawal.
    • Sudden change in school performance.
    • Regressive behaviours.
    • Overly compliant behaviour at home or school.
            • (Wiehe, 1997, p173)
  • Behaviours exhibited by children affected by Abuse. (cont.)
    • Feelings of powerlessness.
    • (Kinnear, 1995, p36)
    • Feelings of being unloved, worthless and unsafe. (Kinnear, 1995, p38)
    • Male victims of abuse worry that the abuse means they are no longer an adequate man.
    • (Kinnear, 1995, p39)
  • Risk factors influencing abuse of children.
    • Inaccurate ideas about capabilities of children at various ages, more likely under age 4. (Kagan, 1998, p140)
    • Poverty – Abuse occurs more often in families who are poor.
    • Physical crowding – If too many people share a small living space, severe punishment of children as a means of maintaining control is more likely.
    • Lack of social support to the parent(s)
  • Risk factors influencing abuse of children.
    • Parent(s) are more likely to be younger than the average parent.
    • More likely to be single parents.
    • Use of drugs and alcohol.
    • Depression.
    • (Kagan, 1998, p141)
  • Possible strategies to assist students to succeed
    • Possible strategies to assist a student through the trauma of abuse:
      • 1. Be someone the child can talk to as needed and not suggest to parents that they take them to get professional help.
      • 2. Direct them straight to professionals and provide no support to the family or child yourself.
      • 3. Provide all the support the family/child needs and direct them to professionals for in depth help.
  • Problem: Identify and assist students to succeed who are at risk of abuse. Goal: To give students the skills to deal with and move on from abuse in their past. Solution 1 Be someone the child can talk to as needed and not suggest to parents that they take them to get professional help. Solution 2 Direct them straight to professionals and provide no support to the family or child yourself. Solution 3 Provide all the support the family/child needs and direct them to professionals for in depth help. Try Another Solution Depending on the child another solution may be more suitable. Problem Solved This problem takes a lot of time to resolve and child will eventually get to a point where they have skills to deal with some of how they are feeling. Selected solution Provide all the support the family/child needs and direct them to professionals for in depth help.
  • The solution chosen to be used as needed.
    • Provide all the support the family/child needs and direct them to professionals for in depth help. Providing support to the parents and the child who has been abused isn’t always the nicest position to be in but as a teacher it is a position that we may be in at some point in our working careers.
  • The solution chosen to be used as needed.
    • Education QLD is always willing to help any parents and children who are dealing with a traumatic situation. There are special channels to go through which are found at this link:
    • http://education.qld.gov.au/studentservices/protection/childsafety/students/index.html
  • Strategy to assist talking to a child about the abuse.
    • These steps are a possible way to guide a
    • conversation with a child the first time they talk about the abuse they have experienced:
    • 1. Make it clear that you believe the child and listen. Don't expect the child to tell you everything about the experience to prove that it is true.
    • 2. Acknowledge what has happened, and the feelings associated with it.
  • Strategy to assist talking to a child about the abuse. (Cont.)
    • 3. Don't ask prying questions out of curiosity but as much as possible show care, support and interest. Listening may be the best thing you can do.
    • 4. Encourage the child to get support to help with the feelings and what is happening.
  • Strategy to assist talking to a child about the abuse. (Cont.)
    • 5. Be open to helping in any way the child/parent wishes, do not pressure.
    • 6. Do not expect any particular behaviour from the child, different people deal with things in different ways.
    • 7. Don't make judgements or support the abuser.
  • Strategy to assist talking to a child about the abuse. (Cont.)
    • 8. Don't put pressure on yourself thinking that you must come up with all the answers for the child’s complex issues. Sometimes just simple solutions and ideas can help the most.
    • 9. Reassure the child that surviving a huge trauma means that he/she must have great courage.
  • Reference List
    • • Australian Agency for International Development (AUSAID), 2008, Child Protection Policy , Canberra, ACT. Australia.
    • • Bryant, M. Pieris-Caldwell, I. 2005, A picture of Australia’s Children,
    • Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, (AIHW), Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    • • Kinner, K. 1995, Childhood Sexual Abuse , Published by ABC – Clio, Published in USA.
    • • Wiehe, V. 1997, Sibling Abuse – Hidden Physical, Emotional and Sexual trauma , Sage Publishers, California.
    • • Kagan, J. 1998, Child abuse, Physical, The Gale Encyclopaedia of childhood and adolescence, USA, Gale Encyclopaedia.
    • • Department of Education, training and arts, 2008, Education Queensland: Student protection retrieved 1 Dec, 2008 from
    • http://education.qld.gov.au/studentservices/protection/childsafety/students/index.html
    • • Children, Youth and Women’s Health service, 2008, Young adult health- health Topics – Surviving sexual abuse (Young women) Retrieved 1 Dec, 2008 from
    • http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetails.aspx?p=240&np=296&id=2026#7