Connected as a Community<br />Supporting ourselves and each other as we move forward<br />
Our Process<br />Acknowledge the process we have been through and the strength we exhibited on Friday, March 11th.<br />Ap...
Updates<br />Where were you over the past 3 weeks?<br />What helped you move forward following the earthquake and tsunami ...
Do you have any other needs that should be addressed before re-engaging with the students?<br />
Supporting the Students <br />Children need an opportunity to discuss their experiences in a safe, accepting environment. ...
Resiliency<br />Emphasize children’s resiliency. Focus on their competencies.<br />Help children identify what they have d...
Coping Skills<br />Promote positive coping and problem-solving skills. Teach children how to apply problem-solving skills ...
Value of Friends<br />Strengthen children’s friendship and peer support. Children with strong emotional support from other...
Plan how to contact those who have left the community to say goodbye.<br />Incorporate information about the disaster into...
Take Care of  Your Own Needs<br />Take time for yourself and try to deal with your own reactions to the situation as fully...
<ul><li>If you feel you will be unable to facilitate an effective discussion with students due to your own uncertainties p...
Keep Informed<br />Everyone’s information needs are different but having access to the right information at the right time...
Follow-Up Information<br />Link to NASP Site<br />Offer to help with discussion from counsellors.<br />Referral protocol a...
Adapted from: Lazarus, P.J., Jimerson, S.R., & Brock, S.E. (2003). Responding to natural disasters: helping children and f...
Monday earthquake presentation for faculty
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Monday earthquake presentation for faculty

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  • Monday earthquake presentation for faculty

    1. 1. Connected as a Community<br />Supporting ourselves and each other as we move forward<br />
    2. 2. Our Process<br />Acknowledge the process we have been through and the strength we exhibited on Friday, March 11th.<br />Appreciate those of us who are back together but accept that there will be some that will not return. Plan how to contact those who have left the community to say goodbye.<br />Support teachers and other school staff by providing information about stress reactions and guidance on how to best attend to their own needs, and then the needs of students.<br />
    3. 3. Updates<br />Where were you over the past 3 weeks?<br />What helped you move forward following the earthquake and tsunami and manage the ongoing nuclear concerns?<br />How do you feel about returning to YIS now?<br />
    4. 4. Do you have any other needs that should be addressed before re-engaging with the students?<br />
    5. 5. Supporting the Students <br />Children need an opportunity to discuss their experiences in a safe, accepting environment.  Provide activities that enable children to discuss their experiences. This may include a range of methods (both verbal and nonverbal) and incorporate varying projects (e.g., drawing, stories, music, drama, audio and video recording). It is perfectly normal for them to discuss the event over and over again.<br />Acknowledge and normalize their feelings. Allow children to discuss their feelings and concerns, and address any questions they may have regarding the event. Listen and empathize. Let them know that their reactions are normal and expected. If children are hesitant to share, do not force children to talk.<br />
    6. 6. Resiliency<br />Emphasize children’s resiliency. Focus on their competencies.<br />Help children identify what they have done in the past that helped them cope when they were frightened or upset.<br />Bring their attention to other communities that have experienced natural disasters and recovered or are recovering (ie. Christ Church, New Orleans, Thailand).<br />
    7. 7. Coping Skills<br />Promote positive coping and problem-solving skills. Teach children how to apply problem-solving skills to disaster-related stressors.  <br />Encourage children to develop realistic and positive methods of coping that increase their ability to manage their anxiety and to identify which strategies fit with each situation.<br />Discuss potential for additional earthquakes.<br />
    8. 8. Value of Friends<br />Strengthen children’s friendship and peer support. Children with strong emotional support from others are better able to cope with adversity. Children’s relationships with peers can provide suggestions for how to cope and can help decrease isolation.<br />
    9. 9. Plan how to contact those who have left the community to say goodbye.<br />Incorporate information about the disaster into related subject areas, as appropriate. Science, math, history, and language arts may be especially relevant.<br />Seek the help of the school counselor for discussion ideas or strategies for managing the conversation. <br />
    10. 10. Take Care of Your Own Needs<br />Take time for yourself and try to deal with your own reactions to the situation as fully as possible.<br />You will be better able to help your children if you are coping well. If you are anxious or upset, your children are more likely to feel the same way.<br />Talk to other adults such as family, friends, faith leaders, or counselors. It is important not to dwell on your fears or anxiety by yourself. Sharing feelings with others often makes people feel more connected and secure.<br />Take care of your physical health. Make time, however small, to do things you enjoy. Avoid using drugs or alcohol to feel better.<br />
    11. 11. <ul><li>If you feel you will be unable to facilitate an effective discussion with students due to your own uncertainties please contact the school counselor in your division and we will help you. </li></li></ul><li>Signs of Particular Emotional Difficulty<br />Preschoolers—thumb sucking, bedwetting, clinging to parents, sleep disturbances, loss of appetite, fear of the dark, regression in behavior, and withdrawal from friends and routines.<br />Elementary School Children—irritability, aggressiveness, clinginess, nightmares, school avoidance, poor concentration, and withdrawal from activities and friends.<br />Adolescents—sleeping and eating disturbances, agitation, increase in conflicts, physical complaints, delinquent behavior, and poor concentration.<br />
    12. 12. Keep Informed<br />Everyone’s information needs are different but having access to the right information at the right time can make a huge difference<br />
    13. 13. Follow-Up Information<br />Link to NASP Site<br />Offer to help with discussion from counsellors.<br />Referral protocol and Link<br />TELL and Mental Health Providers of Japan Website.<br />
    14. 14. Adapted from: Lazarus, P.J., Jimerson, S.R., & Brock, S.E. (2003). Responding to natural disasters: helping children and families. Retrieved from http://www.nasponline.org/resources/crisis_safety/naturaldisaster_teams_ho.aspx<br />

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