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Supporting Underrepresented Students in Independent Schools: Valuable Best Practices
 

Supporting Underrepresented Students in Independent Schools: Valuable Best Practices

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Presented at the 2013 NPEA conference by: SMART

Presented at the 2013 NPEA conference by: SMART

http://educational-access.org/npea_conference_workshops_2013.php

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    Supporting Underrepresented Students in Independent Schools: Valuable Best Practices Supporting Underrepresented Students in Independent Schools: Valuable Best Practices Presentation Transcript

    • Supporting Underrepresented Students in Independent Schools: Valuable Best Practices Ben Buis Director of Operations & Academic Programs Erin Gevertz Director of Placement Services & Student Support
    • Content 9:45 – 9:50 Introduction & Objectives Why Diversity Matters in Independent 9:50 – 10:00 Schools 10:00 – 10:20 Challenges for Underrepresented Students 10:20 – 10:40 Solutions & Strategies 10:40 – 10:50 Best Practices & SMART Blueprint 10:50 – 10:55 SMART Profile & Impact 10:55 – 11:00 Q&A
    • Objectives • Participants will clarify and affirm why having inclusive & diverse communities in independent schools is a priority. • Participants will identify and dialogue about the challenges facing underrepresented students & families in independent schools. • Participants will walk away with a blueprint of suggested strategies and solutions in order to address the challenges facing underrepresented students & families in independent schools. • Participants will learn how, through partnership, SMART assists independent schools in identifying and supporting underrepresented students at their schools.
    • Content 9:45 – 9:50 Introduction & Objectives Why Diversity Matters in Independent 9:50 – 10:00 Schools 10:00 – 10:20 Challenges for Underrepresented Students 10:20 – 10:40 Solutions & Strategies 10:40 – 10:50 Best Practices & SMART Blueprint 10:50 – 10:55 SMART Profile & Impact 10:55 – 11:00 Q&A
    • The Value Add of Diversity • Think, Pair, Share Activity – Why should an independent school want to include underrepresented students & families in their community? – What do underrepresented students & families bring to their school communities?
    • Content 9:45 – 9:50 Introduction & Objectives Why Diversity Matters in Independent 9:50 – 10:00 Schools 10:00 – 10:20 Challenges for Underrepresented Students 10:20 – 10:40 Solutions & Strategies 10:40 – 10:50 Best Practices & SMART Blueprint 10:50 – 10:55 SMART Profile & Impact 10:55 – 11:00 Q&A
    • What are the challenges facing underrepresented studentsin independent schools? • Breakout Activity – Break out into 5 groups. – Brainstorm some challenges students from underrepresented communities might face in independent school settings. – Each group will provide specific examples of challenges. – Challenges will be shared with the whole group.
    • Challenges Facing Underrepresented Students 1. Financial 2. 5. Racial Academic 3. Social & 4. Cultural Emotional
    • Examples of Challenges Examples of challenges underrepresented students face at independent schools that SMART has seen: • Financial challenge – 6th Grade Asian boy wants to play on the basketball team. He requires sports goggles but his family can‘t afford them. Also, because his father works on Saturdays, he doesn‘t have reliable transportation to games. • Language challenge– Spanish and Cantonese translators are required at parent/teacher meetings and on school tours. School does not have translators or history of bringing them in. • Culture challenge– 8th grade African American girl is kicked out of class and suspended from school for lip-smacking and eye-rolling in the classroom. Teacher and Administrator feel completely disrespected. • Race challenge – 6th grade African American girl is told by an Asian boy in her humanities class that her grades don‘t matter because she‘ll be ―on the corner smoking dope‖ anyways. The following day the African American girl asks ―did you just say that because of the color of my skin?‖ to which the boy responds, ―Yes.‖ After peacemaking between the two students, a discussion begins between school administrator and CBO. Primary conversation points are: The boy‘s understanding of what he said. Does he ‗get it‘? Does he understand the implications of his statement? Did the girl provoke the second comment? Is she being provocative? • Institutional Practices challenge – 7th Grade Latino boy is having trouble focusing in class and isn‘t completing homework. After multiple tests diagnose no learning disabilities, the student‘s advisor continues to run more tests, even asking the doctors to re-run tests.
    • Examples of Challenges 1.Financial • Navigating a more rigorous • Reconciling the two academic environment. worlds the students are • Understanding and living in (―Code- accepting different Switching‖). 5. Racial 2.Academic expectations in and out of • Making new friends with the classroom. peers from privileged • Parents unable to backgrounds. financially or resourcefully • Having pride in their provide tutors, learning accomplishments vs. 3. Social & specialists, therapists, etc. shame of being the 4. Cultural Emotional • Language barriers prevent ―scholarship student.‖ parents from connecting • Family doesn‘t use with teachers. technology to • Less homework help at communicate with• Understanding access to home; parents have less school. financial aid to offset high tuition formal education than • Getting to school – costs. those of independent students take more• Navigate financial aid forms. school peers. than one bus to arrive.• Keeping track of ―Extra‖ costs • Students have lowered • Student is called on to outside of tuition. academic and social be the ―expert‖ for their expectations for students ethnic group in class. on scholarship than their
    • Strategies to Support Underrepresented Students Financial Challenges Financial Strategies
    • Strategies to Support Underrepresented Students
    • Strategies to Support Underrepresented Students
    • Content 9:45 – 9:50 Introduction & Objectives Why Diversity Matters in Independent 9:50 – 10:00 Schools 10:00 – 10:20 Challenges for Underrepresented Students 10:20 – 10:40 Solutions & Strategies 10:40 – 10:50 Best Practices & SMART Blueprint 10:50 – 10:55 SMART Profile & Impact 10:55 – 11:00 Q&A
    • What are solutions & strategies to support underrepresentedstudents in independent schools? • Breakout Activity – Continue working in the 5 groups. – Brainstorm some solutions and strategies that will help to resolve the challenges underrepresented students face at independent schools. – Each group will provide specific solutions to the list of challenges presented by the group in the last activity. – Solutions will be shared with the whole group.
    • Strategies to Support Underrepresented Students 1. Financial 2.Academi 5. Racial c 3. Social & 4. Cultural Emotional
    • Strategies to Support Underrepresented Students Financial Challenges Financial Strategies
    • Strategies to Support Underrepresented Students
    • Strategies to Support Underrepresented Students
    • Content 9:45 – 9:50 Introduction & Objectives Why Diversity Matters in Independent 9:50 – 10:00 Schools 10:00 – 10:20 Challenges for Underrepresented Students 10:20 – 10:40 Solutions & Strategies 10:40 – 10:50 Best Practices & SMART Blueprint 10:50 – 10:55 SMART Profile & Impact 10:55 – 11:00 Q&A
    • Best Practices for Financial Challenges • True Full Scholarships – Schools provide tuition assistance including aid for all mandatory field trips, laptops, lunch, uniforms, music lessons, sports uniforms, transportation. • Identify Potential “Extra” Costs – camping gear, sporting equipment, tickets to school-wide events, passport fees • Schools Value a Diverse and Inclusive Learning Environment - an investment into their community that is valued from Head of school to the parent community. Schools are not only providing service to the students, the students are also viewed as providing a service to the school and its student body. • Annual Fund Giving – parents educated about the importance of 100% giving (not really about the amount) & SMART guarantees that 100% of current families give to their school ($5-$35 a year) • Partnerships – with scholarship-only programs (BASIC Fund) or placement only programs (A Better Chance)
    • Best Practices for Academic Challenges • Academic Summer Enrichment Program – bridge the summer learning gap • After School Program - out of school learning time is essential, and provides a safe learning environment outside of schools. • Tutors – recruit dedicated, committed and caring volunteers and offset their lack of skills in teaching with training and continued support. • Faculty Liaison – partner schools must provide a liaison to be an advocate for our students and to ensure SMART is involved in having an active voice in supporting our students. • Parent Education, Advocacy, and Support – to ensure effective communication within schools and to ensure they feel confident to demand the most from schools. • College Bound Culture – building effective peer cohorts that travel together to college. • Tailored Support – every student has different needs and strengths, individually track each student and ensure the right placement into schools.
    • Best Practice for Social/Emotional Challenges • Separate After School Program Location – purposefully located not in a school setting to ensure a safe and open learning environment • Peer Support (Shared Experiences & Backgrounds) – students meet other students (various grade levels, other independent schools) with similar backgrounds but have shared experiences of transition • High School Scholars and College Alumni - are active members of our community and become role models for middle school scholars • Life-skills, Leadership, and Self-advocacy Curriculum – ensuring their voices/questions are heard within the school community • House Visits – by a dedicated faculty advocate at their schools are highly encouraged so that schools understand where the students are coming from • Trained & Dedicated Mentors – exposure to new ideas, experiences, career paths
    • Best Practices for Schools • Important Questions for Schools – Does the school have a dedicated, administrative level Diversity Director position to help lead mission-driven change? – Are students taught to be empowered about their diversity, and explore issues on social justice? – Is the teaching staff engaged & empowered on issues of diversity? – What professional development opportunities related to issues of diversity and cultural competency are available for faculty and staff? – Does school leadership place equity at the center both in terms of daily and long-term work? – Is the school actively reaching out to ensure underrepresented families are invested and involved in the school community? – Has the school set realistic goals, and ensured assessment and accountability procedures are in place?
    • Best Practices for Successful Partnering CBOs Must: Schools Must: - educate and empower families - help educate and empower families - provide & build community/peer support - remember and provide for the - be a strong advocate for students hidden costs that exist at their and families schools - encourage and provide - continual professional professional development at development to better support partner schools for supporting students and families students - set high expectations for students - provide a specific point person in the school to help maintain the - provide a safe, trusting place for partnership students to thrive - set high expectations for - engage in consistent and honest underrepresented students dialogue with partner schools - provide multi-cultural curriculum
    • The SMART Blueprint: ―Know the kids, find the best fit, buildcommunity and affirm identity.‖ Know the Kids Find the Best Fit Build Community and Affirm Identity • Have strong recruiting • Director of Placement Services – dedicated role • Small student numbers criteria better ensure intimate • Application in multiple • 21 partner schools— relationships and languages provide range of options for students tailored support • Work directly with • Close relationships with • College bound cohorts public schools schools, constant • After school • Strong ties to communication with programming (this community through liaisons cohort of students families and CBOs • One-on-one meetings operates, essentially, • Application as self- with families about as an affinity group) selector options • Tutors and Mentors • Importance of family • Assistance with school • SMART presence at commitment and financial applications parent-teacher • Selection Events • Serve as strong meetings advocates for placement • Get to know the • Family help -- Taxes students at summer • Translators provided and financial aid programming • Accompaniment on tours • College Access • Agreement on final school Program choice • Alumni Advisory Board • Parent financial workshops
    • Content 9:45 – 9:50 Introduction & Objectives Why Diversity Matters in Independent 9:50 – 10:00 Schools 10:00 – 10:20 Challenges for Underrepresented Students 10:20 – 10:40 Solutions & Strategies 10:40 – 10:50 Best Practices & SMART Blueprint 10:50 – 10:55 SMART Profile & Impact 10:55 – 11:00 Q&A
    • SMART builds individual success stories, one studentat a time. SMART‘s mission is to provide motivated, financially disadvantaged students with the educational opportunities, personal experiences and social support services to foster academic excellence and community engagement.
    • SMART engages all aspects of the community toensure effective results for our studentsMotivated students are referred to SMART recruits scholars,SMART by our community partners navigates the admissions process,including San Francisco public provides academic support, collegeelementary schools and access services, and connects allcommunity-based organizations scholars, partners, and volunteers.such as the JamestownCommunity Center and MissionGraduates.Volunteers, representing all SMART works closely withprofessional sectors, tutor independent partner schoolsand mentor SMART to ensure that SMART scholarsscholars, providing ongoing are thriving in their newacademic and emotional academic and social settings.support.
    • Motivated, under-served youth in San Francisco facechallenging opportunity gaps More students of color are dropping Low-income students, on average, out of high school and are not are not academically prepared. college-ready. • 2/3 of 8th graders are scoring below • Percentage of minority groups dropped grade level in reading and math out of San Francisco public high schools in 2009-2010: Latino, 22.7%; • Students who don‘t pass the 6th and Asia/Pacific Islanders, 25%; and African 8th grade state tests have only a 1 in 6 American, 33.9% chance of graduating high school • Of the San Francisco public high school • On ACT College readiness graduates, only 25.4% of African- benchmarks, less than 1 in 5 low- Americans and 32.6% of Latinos income students were academically completed courses required for state prepared to succeed in the four major college admissions subject areas Students who are the first in their families to go to college end poverty in their family lines forever.Source:2007 California Dept of Education, 2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress Report. US Dept. of Labor
    • SMART‘s collaborative model narrows the opportunitygap and strives to break the cycle of poverty Academic Programs Placement College Services Access SMART advocates for the student via multiple touch points
    • SMART‘s web of wrap-around services and supportensures student success • Recruits from 40+ referral partners. • Provides Individualized independent school advocacy and placement. Placement • Assists in financial aid process. Services • Educates and empowers families. • Navigates high school admissions process. • Provides rigorous academic support through structured afterschool and summer programs. • Leverages school partnerships to monitor and track Academic academic progress to ensure success. Programs • Individually assigned tutoring and mentoring. • Ongoing family support, including workshops and translation services. • School-year support and tracking of academic progress. • Structured workshops freshman through senior year. • College, major, and career exploration opportunities. • One-on-one college counseling. College • Assists with course selection and SAT preparation. Access • Navigates college application and financial aid process. • Cultivates community service and engagement opportunities. • Internship and extra-curricular assistance and
    • Our Impact: Our proven results demonstrateeffectiveness SMART serves 165 Over the past 7 years, students per year, Since 1997, SMART 100% of our 8th grade with a plan to expand has secured over $9 graduates have services to 500 million dollars in enrolled in strong students a year scholarships for our college preparatory over the next five scholars. high schools. years. 92% of SMART With support from our college-age scholars tutors and our 80% of our are pursuing structured academic volunteer tutors secondary program, the average and mentors return educations including GPA for current for a second year. top universities like SMART scholars is Yale, Columbia, and 3.3. UC‟s.
    • SMART delivers cost-effective services andprogramming with its diverse funding structureIn 2011-2012 SMART middle school students received:• $775,035 in direct scholarships from SMART partner schools• $41,600 from The BASIC Fund (Bay Area Scholarships for Inner-City Children) to help cover tuition costs.• $35,250 in additional expenses for activities like music lessons, field trips, etc. covered by partner schools.• PLUS: Application fee waivers, transportation, and summer enrichment programming and more!In 2011-2012 SMART „s College Access Program Scholarsreceived:• $11,000 in high school application fee waivers• $7,500 in application fee waivers for college admissions.• $100,000 in high school program placements such as College Track, and Summer Search.• $10,500 in free SAT prep courses.• $925,000 in private high school scholarships obtained through SMART‘s financial aid application assistance.SMART‟s estimated cost per student for the 2011-2012 yearis $3,655.
    • Our Impact: Hear from our students ―All the opportunities that I have been fortunate enough to pursue are a direct result of the encouragement and support that I received from SMART.‖ -- Jimmy Ouyang, SMART 2006 Columbia University, 2010―SMART led me onto a path to success. I had no idea how much the program would change my future. I owe my academic success to the SMART program. The program showed me that if I tried I could achieve my goals. I would notbe here today without the help of the SMART program. There are way too many memories to recall here but to sum it all up; it was a life-changing experience and I loved it.‖ Jackie Chen, SMART 2011
    • Our Impact: Hear from our partners and volunteers ―I am proud of Hamlin‟s commitment to SMART. The beauty of SMART is that it guides both individuals and institutions like Hamlin on their path to greatness. And for that, I thank SMART from the bottom of my heart. I promise that Hamlin will be a faithful partner as long as I am at the helm.‖ -- Wanda Greene, Head of School, Hamlin School ―Volunteering at SMART allows me to grow personally and develop stronger and emotional ties to San Francisco.‖ -- Jared Rodecker, Volunteer Tutor ―Volunteering at SMART is the best way to give back and a great way to get to know a terrific kid.‖ -- Sara Lindeman, Volunteer Mentor
    • Content 9:45 – 9:50 Introduction & Objectives Why Diversity Matters in Independent 9:50 – 10:00 Schools 10:00 – 10:20 Challenges for Underrepresented Students 10:20 – 10:40 Solutions & Strategies 10:40 – 10:50 Blueprint & Best Practices 10:50 – 10:55 SMART Profile & Impact 10:55 – 11:00 Q&A
    • Contact SMART Ben Buis - Director of Operations & Academic Programs (415) 865-5400 ben@thesmartprogram.org Melanie Rogers - Director of Development (415) 865-5400 melanie@thesmartprogram.org Nonoko Sato - Executive Director (415) 865-5400 nonoko@thesmartprogram.org