Martina<br />The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision.Helen Keller<br />
Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) <br />potentially blinding eye disorder<br />affects premature infants<br />usually devel...
CAUSES<br />abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina<br />vessels are fragile and can leak, scarring t...
Strategies for Supporting Siblings of Children who are Deaf-Blind <br />Deal with these emotional stages—anger, grief, sad...
Blindness means using alternative skills, methods, and tools to get the job done.<br />Braille reading and writing is the ...
Activities for Children who are blind<br />Sensory <br />Foods like applesauce, peanut butter, cream cheese, or other stic...
Music Therapy& Development<br />Music can facilitate:<br />attention <br />recognition <br />communication <br />anticipat...
Sensory using water <br />Drinking and spilling water at meal times <br />Bathing in water <br />Feeling that his washclot...
Resources for families<br />Centennial Infant and Childcare Center<br />Unique abilities and strengths of children with sp...
Resources for families<br />CNIB (Canadian National Institute For The Blind)<br />CNIB can teach you practical techniques ...
Resources for families<br />Mount Sinai Hospital<br />Genetic Counselling <br />Genetic counselling helps families underst...
Bibliography<br />http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/rop/rop.asp#1<br />http://www.blindchildren.org/textonly/to_edu_dev/3_5_4....
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Martina

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Assignment for Inclusion of children with special needs.

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  • Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a potentially blinding eye disorder that primarily affects premature infants weighing about 2¾ pounds (1250 grams) or less that are born before 31 weeks of gestation (A full-term pregnancy has a gestation of 38–42 weeks). The smaller a baby is at birth, the more likely that baby is to develop ROP. This disorder—which usually develops in both eyes—is one of the most common causes of visual loss in childhood and can lead to lifelong vision impairment and blindness
  • ROP occurs when abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina, the tissue that lines the back of the eye. These abnormal blood vessels are fragile and can leak, scarring the retina and pulling it out of position. This causes a retinal detachment. Retinal detachment is the main cause of visual impairment and blindness in ROP.
  • Siblings will probably want to know why this happened to their brother or sister and how it will affect them .siblings to understand exactly what and how much their sibling may see and hear
  • Find ways to adapt each activity so the blind child can participate; don&apos;t ask if it can be done, ask how can we do it. Don&apos;t make the blind student a &quot;special helper;&quot; he/she needs the same or equivalent educational experiences other children get.
  • Gross Motor Development using MusicWalk/jump to the beat Act out the words ( up, up, up, down, down, down)Hand movement songs -&quot;Itsy Bitsy Spider&quot; (learn what everyone else is doing)
  • without vision helping children to connect sounds and touch to these experiences
  • Martina

    1. 1. Martina<br />The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision.Helen Keller<br />
    2. 2. Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) <br />potentially blinding eye disorder<br />affects premature infants<br />usually develops in both eyes<br />most common causes of visual loss<br />lead to lifelong vision impairment and blindness<br />
    3. 3. CAUSES<br />abnormal blood vessels grow and spread throughout the retina<br />vessels are fragile and can leak, scarring the retina and pulling it out of position<br />causes a retinal detachment.<br />
    4. 4. Strategies for Supporting Siblings of Children who are Deaf-Blind <br />Deal with these emotional stages—anger, grief, sadness, hope and acceptance<br />Take a break! Giving the family a break from the responsibilities of caring for a child who is deaf-blind -time to concentrate on other relationships in the family<br />
    5. 5. Blindness means using alternative skills, methods, and tools to get the job done.<br />Braille reading and writing is the equivalent of print reading and writing (see Quick Braille Lesson later in this article). <br />Cane travel is essential to the child's independence (see Cane Travel later in this article). <br />Looking at objects with the hands. The blind child gets information tactually just as sighted children get it visually. <br />Doing things by touch instead of by eyesight. <br />Tactually exploring a room to make a mental map and find out where things are placed.<br />Developing and using other senses.<br />Developing and using memory.<br />Developing and using sound localization, that is, the ability to tell where a sound is coming from<br />ask for information<br />
    6. 6. Activities for Children who are blind<br />Sensory <br />Foods like applesauce, peanut butter, cream cheese, or other sticky foods<br />"finger paint" with foods of different consistencies <br />foods so he/she can smell, taste, and touch safely<br />Touch different materials to parts of her body<br />soles of feet, legs, arms and nose or cheeks. <br />felt, velvet, flannel, silk, ribbon, etc. <br />These texture squares are a great source of different textures.<br />
    7. 7. Music Therapy& Development<br />Music can facilitate:<br />attention <br />recognition <br />communication <br />anticipation <br />fine and gross motor skills <br />social skills <br />patterning (such as counting or pre-reading skills) <br />fostering memories <br />self-esteem<br />
    8. 8. Sensory using water <br />Drinking and spilling water at meal times <br />Bathing in water <br />Feeling that his washcloth is first dry then wet when he takes a bath <br />Going to the pool <br />Smelling the chlorine at the pool <br />Going to the beach <br />Smelling the salt water <br />Listening to the waves at the beach <br />Feeling the difference between wet and dry sand <br />Smelling the rain or dad water the yard <br />Walking out into the rain <br />Listening to the rain <br />Feeling that everything is wet after it rains <br />Feeling his sweaty brow on a hot day <br />Feeling his drool on his belly <br />Feeling and smelling his wet diaper <br />Hearing mom or dad take a shower <br />Hearing the toilet flush <br />Hearing the tea kettle whistle when we boil water for tea in the morning <br />Hearing mom or dad wash the dishes or wash their hands<br />
    9. 9. Resources for families<br />Centennial Infant and Childcare Center<br />Unique abilities and strengths of children with special needs, and encourages all of them to develop the confidence and skills to find their place in the world.<br />Development and education <br />individual needs of each child and family through early intervention at: <br />Home <br />Integrated preschool <br />Kindergarten programs<br />Through participation in community programs.<br />1580 Yonge StreetToronto, OntarioM4T 1Z8<br />Centre: 416-935-0200Foundation: 416-935-1200<br />Toronto Preschool Speech and Language ServicesToronto Public Health<br />Services are free <br />Available in French<br />Families living in the City of Toronto <br />experiencing challenges with communication development<br />hearing loss<br />visual impairment.<br />416-338-8255 (voice)Monday – Friday8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.<br />
    10. 10. Resources for families<br />CNIB (Canadian National Institute For The Blind)<br />CNIB can teach you practical techniques to support your loved one as they live with vision loss. Whether it means learning how to make your home more accessible, guide your friend while traveling, or getting tips to help your child adjust to a visual world, we can help.<br />1929 Bayview Avenue <br />ON M4G 3E8<br />416-486-2500<br />Ontario's Blind - Low Vision Early Intervention Program <br />Designed to give children who are born blind or with low vision the best possible start in life. Specialized family-centred services are funded by the province and are available for children from birth to Grade 1.<br />477 Mount Pleasant Road 3rd floor Toronto, Ontario M7A 1G1 Tel: 416-325-0500<br />
    11. 11. Resources for families<br />Mount Sinai Hospital<br />Genetic Counselling <br />Genetic counselling helps families understand the science of genetics and how it may relate to them.<br />Anyone who has unanswered questions about diseases, chromosome abnormalities or a birth defect in their family or partner’s family such as:<br />hearing or vision loss in infancy or in childhood<br />Mount Sinai HospitalJoseph and Wolf Lebovic Health Complex600 University AvenueToronto, ON M5G 1X5Tel: 416-596-4200<br />
    12. 12. Bibliography<br />http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/rop/rop.asp#1<br />http://www.blindchildren.org/textonly/to_edu_dev/3_5_4.html<br />Gameshttp://www.wonderbaby.org/search-topics/development.html<br />http://cicc.ca/<br />http://www.tpsls.on.ca/blv/index.htm<br />http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/topics/earlychildhood/blindnesslowvision/brochure.aspx<br />http://www.mountsinai.on.ca/care/pdmg/gencouncil<br />

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