• Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
50
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • October 6th, 1877
  • Quabbin
  • Public access at Nut Island, Quincy
  • Blue hills covered storage
  • Blue Hills
  • Alewife Stormwater wetland
  • Cambridge Stormwater Wetland (assume this is Alewife)
  • Campbridge Stormwater Wetland (Assume this is Alewife?)
  • * Progress on local permits for opening trails. MWRA Aqueduct Trails Program, January 2014
  • MWRA is a steward of public lands.
  • Music courtesy of Medea Connection

Transcript

  • 1. From 1790 – 1940, aqueducts were built to supply water to Greater Boston.
  • 2. By 2012, the historic aqueducts and reservoirs were out of daily use. But the pristine land was kept closed off.
  • 3. Everything changed in 2012: the MWRA voted to open 40 miles of trails through back-up and abandoned aqueducts.
  • 4. The aqueduct trails build on a long history of public access on certain MWRA properties. Quabbin Reservoir, Belchertown, MA
  • 5. Deer Island, Winthrop, MA
  • 6. Deer Island, Winthrop, MA
  • 7. Nut Island, Quincy, MA
  • 8. Nut Island, Quincy, MA
  • 9. Blue Hills Covered Storage, Quincy, MA
  • 10. Blue Hills Covered Storage, Quincy, MA
  • 11. Alewife Stormwater Wetland, Cambridge, MA
  • 12. Alewife Stormwater Wetland, Cambridge, MA
  • 13. Alewife Stormwater Wetland, Cambridge, MA
  • 14. Towns that have partnered with MWRA for trails as of 2/2014.
  • 15. Photography by MAPC and MWRA staff and courtesy Marilyn Humphries, 2013. Music courtesy Medea Connection.