Behaviorism vs cognitive black box
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Behaviorism vs cognitive black box

on

  • 8,513 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
8,513
Views on SlideShare
8,283
Embed Views
230

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
65
Comments
0

3 Embeds 230

https://blackboard.utdl.edu 119
http://blackboard.utdl.edu 110
http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Behaviorism vs cognitive black box Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Demonstration Behaviorism Vs Cognitive Psychology Use the left and right arrow keys to go backwards or forwards through slides.
  • 2. To behaviorists, the human mind is like a black box. It’s sealed, and you can’t see inside.
  • 3. The behaviorists claimed that we could still study the organism by selectively presenting stimuli to the “black box” Stimulus
  • 4. Then…something happens in the person, and we see responses emitted by the organism (fancy way of saying “people do things”) Stimulus Example Responses: Working harder in the future Response Example Stimuli: Giving a raise after good performance ………………………… .
  • 5. Then…something happens in the person, and we see responses emitted by the organism (fancy way of saying “people do things”) Stimulus Example Responses: Working harder in the future Buying the product Response Example Stimuli: Giving a raise after good performance Pairing music and attractive people with products in ads ………………………… . ………………………… .
  • 6. Then…something happens in the person, and we see responses emitted by the organism (fancy way of saying “people do things”) Stimulus Example Responses: Working harder in the future Buying the product Staying away from the person who yelled Response Example Stimuli: Giving a raise after good performance Pairing music and attractive people with products in ads Getting yelled at ………………………… . ………………………… . ………………………… ..
  • 7. Then…something happens in the person, and we see responses emitted by the organism (fancy way of saying “people do things”) Stimulus Example Responses: Working harder in the future Buying the product Staying away from the person who yelled Head turning, staring  Response Example Stimuli: Giving a raise after good performance Pairing music and attractive people with products in ads Getting yelled at Seeing a hottie  ………………………… . ………………………… . ………………………… .. ………………………… ..
  • 8. To a behaviorist, the black box is sealed, closed, and inaccessible. They looked for law-like relationships between stimuli and responses (in a broad sense). Stimulus Example Responses: Working harder in the future Buying the product Staying away from the person who yelled Head turning, staring  Response Example Stimuli: Giving a raise after good performance Pairing music and attractive people with products in ads Getting yelled at Seeing a hottie  ………………………… . ………………………… . ………………………… .. ………………………… .. To Watson, what goes on in the box is unimportant!
  • 9. They found classical conditioning (associative learning) and operant conditioning (instrumental learning) Stimulus Example Responses: Working harder in the future Buying the product Staying away from the person who yelled Head turning, staring  Response Example Stimuli: Giving a raise after good performance Pairing music and attractive people with products in ads Getting yelled at Seeing a hottie  ………………………… . ………………………… . ………………………… .. ………………………… .. reinforcement punishment Classical cond. Me being funny
  • 10. Problem…
    • Consider two different people.
    • You see both get the same stimulus. You see both make the same response.
    • Are they the same?
    • Did the same thing go through the “black box” (the minds) of both people?
  • 11. Problem…
    • Watson would answer:
        • It doesn’t matter if the same thing goes through their minds or not. We can’t study consciousness, so any consideration of what’s in the “black box” of people’s minds is unscientific.
    • Skinner would answer:
        • What goes through people’s minds is irrelevant. They have learned to have their particular thoughts under these circumstances with this stimulus. What is important is understanding the relationships between input (stimulus) and output (response) through the “black box.”
    • Cognitive psychologists would answer:
        • Very different cognitions (thoughts) may be going on in the “black box.” Here’s evidence for how we know this…
  • 12. Cognitive psychologists specialize in using creative ways to study what is going on in the black box. It is difficult to study what is going on in a person’s thoughts, but it is not impossible.
  • 13. In general, you can start with observing a tie between a stimulus and a response and hypothesize what is going on cognitively in the “black box,” that is, what is going through one’s mind? Response Stimulus
    • Maybe they’re thinking A
    • Maybe they’re thinking B
  • 14. Then you can change the stimulus or some other aspects of the experiment so that the different hypothesized cognitions would produce DIFFERENT responses. Change the Experiment Response if A
    • If they think A, we’ll see them do one behavior
    • If they think B, we’ll see them do another behavior
    Response if B
  • 15. Notice, although we can not study what is in the “black box” directly in one study, we CAN gain information about cognitions with a series of creatively designed studies!! Change the Experiment Compare Results The challenge to a researcher is to find ways to change a study so that different hypothesized cognitions will produce different results
  • 16.
    • Cognitive research gets very detailed and technical, but when the findings are put together, we get to peer into the Black Box of the Mind
    • More recently, cognitive neuroscientists attempt to tie the creative findings of cognitive research with physiological findings from neuroscience
  • 17.
    • Take home message:
    • Even if something is not easily observed, you may be able to study it scientifically.