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Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
Magnetic effect of electric current
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Magnetic effect of electric current

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  • 1. Magnetic effect of electric current By Tisha Gupta X-F
  • 2.  The term ‘magnetic effect of electric current’ means that an electric current flowing in a wire produces a magnetic field around it . A Magnet is an object which attracts pieces of iron, steel, nickel and cobalt. A bar magnet is a long, rectangular bar of uniform cross-section which attracts pieces of iron, steel, nickel and cobalt.
  • 3. MAGNETIC FIELD  A magnetic field is the magnetic influence of electric currents and magnetic materials. The magnetic field at any given point is specified by both a direction and a magnitude (or strength); as such it is a vector field. The term is used for two distinct but closely related fields denoted by the symbols B and H, which are measured in units of tesla and amp per meter respectively in the SI.B is most commonly defined in terms of the Lorentz force it exerts on moving electric charges.
  • 4.  Earth's magnetic field, also known as the geomagnetic field, is the magnetic field that extends from the Earth's interior to where it meets the solar wind, a stream of charged particles emanating from the Sun. Its magnitude at the Earth's surface ranges from 25 to 65 microtesla (0.25 to 0.65 gauss). It is approximately the field of a magnetic dipole tilted at an angle of 10 degrees with respect to Earth's rotational axis, as if there were a bar magnet placed at that angle at the center of the Earth. Unlike a bar magnet, however, Earth's magnetic field changes over time because it is generated by a geodynamic (in Earth's case, the motion of molten iron alloys in its outer core).
  • 5.  Electromagnetism, or the electromagnetic force is one of the four fundamental interactions in nature, the other three being the strong interaction, the weak interaction, and gravitation. This force is described by electromagnetic fields, and has innumerable physical instances including the interaction of electrically charged particles and the interaction of uncharged magnetic force fields with electrical conductors.
  • 6.  A current carrying loop works like a disc magnet. The polarity of this magnet can be easily understood with the help of clock face rule. If the current is flowing in anti-clockwise direction, then the face of the loop shows north pole. On the other hand, if the current is flowing in clockwise direction, then the face of the loop shows south pole.
  • 7.  A solenoid is a coil wound into a tightly packed helix. The term was invented by French physicist André-Marie Ampère to designate a helical coil. In physics, the term refers specifically to a long, thin loop of wire, often wrapped around a metallic core, which produces a uniform magnetic field in a volume of space (where some experiment might be carried out) when an electric current is passed through it.
  • 8.  An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by electric current. The magnetic field disappears when the current is turned off. Electromagnets are widely used as components of other electrical devices, such as motors, generators, relays, loudspeakers, hard disks, MRI machines, scientific instruments, and magnetic separation equipment, as well as being employed as industrial lifting electromagnets for picking up and moving heavy iron objects like scrap iron.
  • 9. ELECTRIC MOTOR  An electric motor is an electric machine that converts electrical energy into mechanical energy.  In normal motoring mode, most electric motors operate through the interaction between an electric motor's magnetic field and winding currents to generate force within the motor. In certain applications, such as in the transportation industry with traction motors, electric motors can operate in both motoring and generating or braking modes to also produce electrical energy from mechanical energy.
  • 10.  Direct current (DC) is the unidirectional flow of electric charge. Direct current is produced by sources such as batteries, thermocouples, solar cells, and commutator-type electric machines of the dynamo type. Direct current may flow in a conductor such as a wire, but can also flow through semiconductors, insulators, or even through a vacuum as in electron or ion beams.
  • 11.  Alternating current (AC, also ac), the flow of electric charge periodically reverses direction. In direct current (DC, also dc), the flow of electric charge is only in one direction. The abbreviations AC and DC are often used to mean simply alternating and direct, as when they modify current or voltage.

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