Moving charges in a magnetic field

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Moving charges in a magnetic field

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Moving charges in a magnetic field

  1. 1. Moving charges in a magnetic field
  2. 2. Electron Beams • The path of the electron beam can be seen where it over the fluorescent screen in the tube. The beam is deflected down- wards when a magnetic field is directed into the plane of the screen.
  3. 3. Electron Beams (Continued) • Each electron within the beam experiences a force due to the magnetic field. • The beam follows a circular path because the direction of the force on each electron is perpendicular to the direction of motion of the electron and to the field direction.
  4. 4. Calculating the Force • A beam of charged particles crossing a vacuum tube is an electric current across a tube. • F = BQv (where F= the force of the particle B= the flux density Q= the charge of the particle And v= the velocity of the charged particle.)
  5. 5. The use of Magnetic Fields • Magnetic Fields are used in particle physics detectors in order to separate different charged particles and to measure their momentum from the curvature of the tracks they create. • All charged particles which follow this curvature path is acted upon by a force due to the field. Positively charged particles (such as protons) are pushed in the opposite direction to negatively charged particles (such as electrons).
  6. 6. The use of Magnetic Fields • Magnetic Fields are used in particle physics detectors in order to separate different charged particles and to measure their momentum from the curvature of the tracks they create. • All charged particles which follow this curvature path is acted upon by a force due to the field. Positively charged particles (such as protons) are pushed in the opposite direction to negatively charged particles (such as electrons).

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