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Correct Usage of Verb Tenses

Correct Usage of Verb Tenses

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  • Authors/Student Researchers: Judelyn O. Adorna Aivee L. De Leon Module Consultant: Elaine Rose V. Gordula-Nachon English Department Head, Siniloan National High School Module Adviser: For-Ian V. Sandoval CORRECT USAGE OF VERB TENSES G M V O Next
  • VISION A premier university in CALABARZON, offering academic programs and related services designed to respond to the requirements of the Philippines and the global economy, particularly, Asian countries. Back Next Content
  • GOALS In pursuit of the college vision/mission the College of Education is committed to develop the full potential of the individuals, equip them with knowledge, skills, and attitudes in teacher education allied fields to effectively respond to the increasing demands, challenges and opportunities of changing time for global competitiveness. Back Next Content
  • MISSION AND MAIN THRUST The University shall primarily provide advanced education, professional, technological and vocational instruction in agriculture, fisheries, forestry, science, engineering, industrial technologies, teacher education, medicine, law, arts and sciences, information technology and other related fields. It shall also undertake research and extension services, and provide a progressive leadership in its areas of specialization. Back Next Content
    • OBJECTIVES of Bachelor of Secondary Education (BSE)
    • Produce graduates who can demonstrate and practice the professional and ethical requirements for the Bachelor of Secondary Education such as:
    • To serve as positive and powerful role models in the pursuit of learning thereby maintaining high regard to professional growth.
    • Focus on the significance of providing wholesome and desirable learning environment.
    • Facilitate learning process in diverse types of learners.
    • Use varied learning approaches and activities, instructional materials, and learning resources.
    • Use assessment date to plan and revise teaching-learning plans.
    • Direct and strengthen the links between schools and community activities.
    • Conduct research and development in teacher education and other related activities.
    Slide 10 Back Content Next
  • FOREWORD This Teacher’s “ Correct Usage of Verb Tenses ” is part of the requirements in Educational Technology 2 under the revised education curriculum based on CHED Memorandum Order (CMO)-30, Series of 2004. Educational Technology 2 is a three (3)-unit course designed to introduce both traditional, instructional teaching aids and innovative audio-visual materials to facilitate and foster meaningful and effective learning where students are expected to demonstrate a sound understanding of the nature, application and production of the various types of educational technologies. The students are provided with guidance and assistance of selected faculty members of the College through the selection, production and utilization of appropriate technological tools in developing technology-based teacher support materials. Through the role and functions of computers especially the Internet, the student researchers and the advisers are able to design and develop various types of alternative delivery systems. These kinds of activities offer a remarkable learning experience for the education students as future mentors especially in the preparation and utilization of instructional materials. The output of the group’s effort on this enterprise may serve as a contribution to the existing body of instructional materials that the institution may utilize in order to provide effective and quality education. The lessons and evaluations presented in this module may also function as a supplementary reference for secondary teachers and students. JUDELYN O. ADORNA AIVEE L. DE LEON Module Developer Module Developer FOR-IAN V. SANDOVAL Computer Instructor/Adviser Educational Technology 2 ELAINE ROSE V. GORDULA-NACHON Module Consultant LYDIA R. CHAVEZ Dean College of Education Back Content Next
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT The authors hereby express their heartfelt appreciation and sincere thanks to all persons who rendered their worthwhile support and immeasurable help for the successful completion of this module. To their beloved Dean, Prof. Lydia R. Chavez, for promoting academic excellence in the College of Education; To their hardworking instructor, Mr. For-Ian V. Sandoval, for being accommodating and patient enough in helping them complete this module; To their knowledgeable module consultant, Mrs. Elaine Rose V. Gordula-Nachon, English Department Head of Siniloan National High School, for her assistance, willingness and patience in editing this module which led to its successful completion; To their loving parents, for their valuable support, thoughtful appreciation and understanding during the accomplishment of this module and for serving as their constant source of inspiration; To their friends and classmates, for their cheerful encouragement and for comforting them when things seem intolerable during the completion of this module; Above all, to the Almighty God for the knowledge and strength, guidance, blessings and inspiration He extended to make this module an achievement. To all of you, thank you very much! The Authors Back Content Next
  • INTRODUCTION Grammatical inconsistencies seem to be one of the most common problems encountered by learners in English classes. One reason why a number of errors in grammar are made is due to inadequate knowledge and understanding of verb and its forms. Generally, a sentence contains one verb. Consequently, as the number of verb forms in the sentence increases, chances are the possibility of committing errors also increases. Furthermore, the verbs most often used in the English language are irregular verbs which mean that they change in a variety of ways. This also means that students must be familiar and if possible memorize the different verb forms. In addition, verbs change their forms and appearance more often than any other parts of speech, offering the learners a series of choices and snares that force them to pick their way through them carefully and deliberately. Premises considered, it is still possible to learn how to use verbs correctly and effectively since problems with verbs fall into manageable categories. A common problem, for instance, is not knowing the correct form of an irregular verb. This module will present a solution to this particular problem and other common problems that many students encounter in using verbs. It will also provide them with relevant information on correct usage of the different verb tenses with corresponding examples. Through this module, students can broaden their general knowledge of verbs which may eventually improve their skills in writing grammatically correct sentences which is preliminary to the development of coherent and unified paragraphs and composition. Content Back Next
  • GENERAL OBJECTIVES After finishing this module, the students shall be able to: 1. distinguish different verb forms; 2. differentiate simple tenses, perfect tenses, and progressive tenses in terms of function and structure; 3. use different verb tenses appropriately; 4. develop interest in enhancing skills in the use of verbs; 5. realize that the correct usage of verbs contribute to effective verbal and non-verbal communication; 6. construct grammatically correct sentences; 7. apply the concepts learned in writing paragraphs and compositions. Content Back Next
  • VMGO OF THE BSED PROGRAM FOREWORD ACKNOWLEDGMENT INTRODUCTION GENERAL OBJECTIVES TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1 Simple Tenses Lesson 1: Simple Present Tense Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Lesson 2: Simple Past Tense Activity 4 Activity 5 Activity 6 Back Next
  • Lesson 3: Simple Future Tense Activity 7 Activity 8 Activity 9 Chapter Test Chapter 2 Perfect Tenses Lesson 1: Present Perfect Tense Activity 10 Activity 11 Activity 12 Lesson 2: Past Perfect Tense Activity 13 Activity 14 Activity 15 Back Next
  • Lesson 3: Future Perfect Tense Activity 16 Activity 17 Activity 18 Chapter Test Chapter 3 Progressive Tenses Lesson 1: Present Progressive Activity 19 Activity 20 Activity 21 Lesson 2: Past Progressive Activity 22 Activity 23 Activity 24 Back Next
  • Lesson 3: Future Progressive Activity 25 Activity 26 Activity 27 Lesson 4: Present Perfect Progressive Activity 28 Activity 29 Activity 30 Lesson 5: Past Perfect Progressive Activity 31 Activity 32 Activity 33 Back Next
  • Lesson 6: Future Perfect Progressive Activity 34 Activity 35 Activity 36 Chapter Test References Online Resources of Text Online Resources of Images Books About the Authors Back Next
    • OBJECTIVES
      • At the end of this chapter the students shall be able to:
      • differentiate simple present tense and simple past
      • tense and future tense;
      • determine which verb form would best complete the
      • given sentences;
      • increase their knowledge on the appropriate use of
      • simple tenses.
    Content Back Next Chapter 1: Simple Tenses
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • define simple present tense;
    • improve their knowledge regarding the correct
    • usage of simple present tense;
    • answer the activities on simple present tense.
    Objectives: SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE
    • Present tense expresses an unchanging, repeated, or re-occurring action or situation that exists only now. It can also represent a widespread truth.
    • The simple present tense is used to describe an action, an
    • event, or condition that is occurring in the present, at the
    • moment of speaking or writing. It is used when the precise
    • beginning or ending of a present action, event, or condition
    • is unknown or is unimportant to the meaning of the
    • sentence.
    Content Next Back LESSON 1: SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE
    • There are two forms of the verb in the simple present tense – base form and s-form.
    • Verbs in the base form are used in plural nouns/pronouns. While verbs in the s-form are
    • used in singular nouns/pronouns.
    Examples base form s-form I wait she waits They jump Angeli jump The students write Louie writes The singers sing Regine sings The celebrities perform Kris perform You run Giselle runs The painters paint she paints The artists draw Robby draws The actors act Richard act The English majors report Judy reports
    • Each of the highlighted verbs in the following sentences is in the simple present tense
    • and each sentence describes an action taking place in the present:
      • Deborah waits patiently while Bridget books the tickets.
      • The shelf holds three books and a vase of flowers.
      • The crowd moves across the field in an attempt to see the rock star get into his
      • helicopter.
      • The Stephens sisters are both very talented; Virginia writes and Vanessa paints .
      • Ross annoys Walter by turning pages too quickly.
    Content Back Next
    • The simple present is used to express general truths such as scientific fact, as in the
    • following sentences:
      • Rectangles have four sides.
      • Canada Day takes place on July 1, the anniversary of the signing of the British North
      • America Act.
      • The moon circles the earth once every 28 days.
      • Calcium is important to the formation of strong bones.
      • Menarche and menopause mark the beginning and the ending of a woman's reproductive
      • history.
    • The simple present is used to indicate a habitual action, event, or condition, as in the
    • following sentences:
      • Leonard goes to The Jumping Horse Tavern every Thursday evening.
      • My grandmother sends me new mittens each spring.
      • In fairy tales, things happen in threes.
      • We never finish jigsaw puzzles because the cat always eats some of the pieces.
      • Jesse polishes the menorah on Wednesdays.
    • The simple present is also used when writing about works of art, as in the following
    • sentences.
      • Lolly Willowes is the protagonist of the novel Townsend published in 1926.
      • One of Artemisia Gentleschi's best known paintings represents Judith's
      • beheading of Holofernes.
      • The Lady of Shallot weaves a tapestry while watching the passers-by in her
      • mirror.
    Content Back Next
      • Lear rages against the silence of Cordelia and only belatedly realizes that
      • she, not her more vocal sisters, loves him.
      • The play ends with an epilogue spoken by the fool.
    • The simple present can also be used to refer to a future event when used in
    • conjunction with an adverb or adverbial phrase , as in the following sentences.
      • The doors open in 10 minutes.
      • The premier arrives on Tuesday.
      • Classes end next week.
      • The publisher distributes the galley proofs next Wednesday.
      • The lunar eclipse begins in exactly 43 minutes.
    • There are three forms of the verb “ be ” --- am, is, and are.
    • Examples:
      • I am happy.
      • You are invited.
      • Anne is beautiful.
    Content Back Next Act. 1
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • define simple past tense;
    • use simple past tense appropriately;
    • accomplish the activities on simple past tense.
    Objectives: SIMPLE PAST TENSE
    • The simple past tense expresses an action or a condition completed in the past.
    • The simple past is used to describe an action, an event,
    • or condition that occurred in the past, sometime
    • before the moment of speaking or writing.
    Content Back Next LESSON 2: SIMPLE PAST TENSE
    • Verbs are divided into two groups, depending on the way they form the past tense and the past participles.
    • The first one is the regular verbs. They form their past tense by adding -ed or –d to the form of the
    • present tense.
    Examples: alter – altered announce – announced approach – approached barter – bartered boil – boiled calculate – calculated chew – chewed claim – claimed define – defined dissolve – dissolved
    • The other one is the irregular verbs . They form their past tense by adding –n or –en or changing their
    • spelling.
    Examples: become – became begin – began bend – bent bind – bound bleed – bled blow – blew break – broke breed – bred bring – brought build – built buy – bought catch – caught teach – taught choose – chose cling – clung come – came do – did draw – drew drink – drank drive - drove Content Back Next
    • Each of the highlighted verbs in the following sentences is in the simple past
    • tense and each sentence describes an action taking place at some point in past.
    • Examples:
        • A flea jumped from the dog to the cat.
        • Phoebe gripped the hammer tightly and nailed the boards together.
        • The gem-stones sparkled in a velvet lined display case.
        • Artemisia Gentilsechi probably died in 1652.
        • The storyteller began every story by saying "A long time ago when the
        • earth was green.
    Content Next Back Act. 4
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • define simple future tense;
    • use simple future tense in expressing ideas.
    • answer the activities on simple future tense .
    Objectives: SIMPLE FUTURE TENSE
    • The simple future tense expresses an action that
    • has not yet taken place.
    • The simple future tense is used to refer to actions that
    • will take place after the act of speaking or writing.
    • In forming the future tense of a verb, we use the auxiliary
    • verbs shall or will with the base form of the verb. Will is
    • used in all persons while shall is used instead of will in the
    • first person.
    Content Back Next LESSON 3: SIMPLE FUTURE TENSE
  • will/shall + verb base
    • THREE WAYS TO EXPRESS FUTURE TENSE
    • Future tense is formed by using:
    • The speaker of the House will finish her term in May of 1998.
    • Javier will race in the next Olympics.
    • Uncle Jim will be fifty years old next year.
    • Gabrielle will become an engineer someday.
    • The classes will start at 8 am.
    • THREE WAYS TO EXPRESS FUTURE TENSE
    • Future tense is formed by using:
    • The future tense can also be expressed by using:
    am/is/are + going to + verb base
    • The surgeon is going to perform the first bypass in Minnesota.
    • Aira is going to buy new shoes this Saturday.
    • The students are going to take their final examination on Monday.
    • Michelle is going to attend a meeting next week.
    • Jaired is going to play a violin on their program next month.
    • Likewise, future tense may be expressed using the simple present form of the verb with an adverb or
    • adverbial phrase that shows future time.
    verb base/s-form + adverb of time
    • The president speaks tomorrow. (Tomorrow is a future time adverb.)
    • The farmers plant the seeds this morning.
    • The teacher gives quiz next meeting.
    • Selina sends the letter on Tuesday.
    • Jerome watches his favorite movie next week.
    Content Back Next Act. 7 Chpt. Test
  • Chapter 2: Perfect Tenses
    • OBJECTIVES
      • At the end of this chapter the students shall be able to:
      • explain the structure and uses of perfect tenses;
      • use perfect tenses appropriately;
      • answer activities on the use of the three perfect
      • tenses.
    Content Back Next
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • explain the structure and functions of the present
    • perfect tense;
    • use the present perfect tense appropriately;
    • increase knowledge in using present perfect tense
    • appropriately.
    Objectives: PRESENT PERFECT TENSE
    • The present perfect tense is used for an action that began in the past and continues into the present.
    • Present perfect tense describes an action that happened at an
    • indefinite time in the past or that began in the past and continues in
    • the present.This tense is formed by using:
    has/have + past participle of the main verb Content Back Next LESSON 1: PRESENT PERFECT TENSE
    • In forming the present perfect tense, the auxiliary verb has is always used in the third person
    • singular.
    • In changing regular verbs into past participle, we add –d or –ed.
    • Examples:
    • accomplish– accomplished
    • establish – established
    • accommodate– accommodated
    • realize – realized
    • assign – assigned
    • improve – improved
    • jump – jumped
    • walk – walked
    • finish – finished
    • estimate - estimated
    • In changing irregular verbs into past participle, we add –n or –en or we change the spelling of the
    • verb.
    • Examples:
        • prove – proven
        • rise – risen
        • hold – held
        • be – been
        • see – seen
        • seek – sought
        • eat – eaten
        • drive – driven
        • beat – beaten
        • stand - stood
    • The present perfect tense is used to describe action that began in the past and continues into the
    • present or has just been completed at the moment of utterance. The present perfect is often used
    • to suggest that a past action still has an effect upon something happening in the present.
    • Each of the highlighted compound verbs in the following sentences is in the present perfect tense.
      • They have not delivered the documents we need.
    • This sentence suggests that the documents were not delivered in the past and that they are
    • still undelivered.
    Content Back Next
    • The health department has decided that all high school students should be
    • immunized against meningitis.
    • The writer of this sentence uses the present perfect in order to suggest that the
    • decision made in the past is still of importance in the present.
    • The government has cut university budgets; consequently, the dean has
    • increased the size of most classes.
    • Here both actions took place sometime in the past and continue to influence the
    • present.
    • The heat wave has lasted three weeks.
    • In this sentence, the writer uses the present perfect to indicate that a condition
    • (the heat wave) began in past and continues to affect the present.
    • Donna has dreamt about frogs sitting in trees every night this week.
    • Here the action of dreaming has begun in the past and continues into the present.
    Content Back Next Act. 10
  • Objectives:
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • explain the structure and use of the past perfect tense;
    • use the past perfect tense correctly;
    • answer the activities at the end of the lesson.
    PAST PERFECT TENSE
    • The past perfect tense can also be used for an action that started in the past and has been completed at some indefinite time.
    • The past perfect tense is used to refer to actions that took place and were
    • completed in the past. The past perfect is often used to emphasize that one
    • action, event or condition ended before another past action, event, or condition
    • began. This tense is formed by using:
    had + past participle of the main verb
      • had + past participle of the main verb
    Content Back Next LESSON 2: PAST PERFECT TENSE
    • Each of the highlighted verbs in the following sentences is in the past perfect.
          • Miriam arrived at 5:00 p.m. but Mr. Whitaker had closed the store.
    • All the events in this sentence took place in the past, but the act of closing the
    • store takes place before Miriam arrives at the store.
          • After we located the restaurant that Christian had raved about, we ate supper
          • there every Friday.
    • Here the praise ("had raved") precedes the finding ("located") of the restaurant.
    • Both actions took place sometime before the moment of speaking or writing.
          • The elephant had eaten all the hay so we fed it oats for a week.
    • In this sentence, both actions take place in the past, but the eating of the hay
    • ("had eaten") preceded the eating of the oats ("fed").
          • The heat wave had lasted three weeks.
    • While the sentence "The heat wave has lasted three weeks" suggests that a
    • condition began in the past and continues into the present, this sentence describes
    • an action that began and ended sometime in the past ("had lasted"). By using the
    • past perfect the writer indicates that the heat wave has no connection to any
    • events occurring in the present.
          • After she had learned to drive, Alice felt more independent.
    • Here the learning took place and was completed at a specific time in the past. By
    • using the past perfect rather than the simple past ("learned"), the writer
    • emphasises that the learning preceded the feeling of independence.
    Content Back Next Act. 13
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • discuss the structure and function of future perfect
    • tense;
    • follow directions in answering the given activities;
    • improve their skills in using the future perfect tense
    • appropriately.
    Objectives: FUTURE PERFECT TENSE
    • The future perfect tense is used for an action that begins and will end in the future before a particular time.
    • The future perfect tense is used to refer to an action that will be
    • completed sometime in the future before another action takes place. This
    • is formed by using:
      • will +have + past participle of the main verb
    Content Back Next LESSON 3: FUTURE PERFECT TENSE
    • The surgeon will have operated on 6 patients before she attends a luncheon meeting.
    • In this sentence, the act of operating ("will have operated") takes place in the future sometime before the act of attending ("attends").
    • The plumber and his assistant will have soldered all the new joins in pipes before they leave for the next job.
    • Here, the plumbers' act of soldering ("will have soldered") will precede the act of leaving ("leave").
    • By the time you get back from the corner store, we will have finished writing the thank you letters.
    • In this sentence, the act of returning from the store ("get back") takes place after the act of writing ("will have written").
    • If this year is like last year, I will have finished my holiday shopping long before my brother starts his.
    • In this example, the act of finishing ("will have finished") occurs well before the act of starting ("starts").
    • They will have written their first exam by the time we get out of bed.
    • Here, the act of getting out of bed occurs sometime after the writing of the exam.
            • Each of the highlighted verbs in the following sentences is in the future perfect tense.
    Content Next Back Act. 16 Chpt. Test
    • OBJECTIVES
      • At the end of this chapter the students will be able to:
      • explain the six progressive forms of verb tenses;
      • differentiate the progressive tenses from simple
      • tenses and perfect tenses;
      • increase knowledge about verb tenses and its
      • appropriate use in sentences.
    Content Next Back Chapter 3: Progressive Tenses
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • explain the structure and functions of the present
    • progressive tense of the verb;
    • increase skill in the appropriate use of the present
    • progressive tense in sentences;
    • answer the activities on the use of present
    • progressive tense.
    Objectives : PRESENT PROGRESSIVE TENSE
    • Present progressive tense describes an ongoing action that is happening at the
    • same time the statement is written. This tense is formed by using:
    am/is/are + -ing form of the verb
    • The sociologist is examining the effects that racial discrimination has on society.
    Content Next Back LESSON 1: PRESENT PROGRESSIVE TENSE
    • Present progressive tense lets you show that an action is ongoing, that it began
    • sometime in the past but that it is continuing right now and will continue into the future.
    • To form this tense, add "-ing" to the present tense of the verb, then use before it "am,"
    • "is" or "are" whichever is appropriate.
        • The FBI is investigating the case.
        • Visitors are flocking to the new museum.
        • I am hoping for a good grade.
    • Notice how the verb tense indicates that the investigating, flocking and hoping
    • are all going on right now. Each of the actions began at some undefined point in
    • the past and have been going on uninterrupted since then.
        • The plumber and his assistant will have soldered all the new joins in pipes
        • before they leave for the next job.
    • Here, the plumbers' act of soldering ("will have soldered") will precede the act
    • of leaving ("leave").
        • By the time you get back from the corner store, we will have finished writing
        • the thank you letters.
    • In this sentence, the act of returning from the store ("get back") takes place
    • after the act of writing ("will have written").
        • If this year is like last year, I will have finished my holiday shopping long
        • before my brother starts his.
    • In this example, the act of finishing ("will have finished") occurs well before
    • the act of starting ("starts").
        • They will have written their first exam by the time we get out of bed.
    • Here, the act of getting out of bed occurs sometime after the writing of the
    • exam.
    Content Next Back Act. 19
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • characterize the past progressive tense;
    • differentiate past progressive tense from simple
    • past tense;
    • improve knowledge on the correct use of the
    • past progressive tense.
    Objectives: PAST PROGRESSIVE TENSE
    • The past progressive tense is used to describe actions ongoing in
    • the past. These actions often take place within a specific time
    • frame. While actions referred to in the present progressive have
    • some connection to the present, actions referred in the past
    • progressive have no immediate or obvious connection to the
    • present. The on-going actions took place and were completed at
    • some point well before the time of speaking or writing.
    Content Next Back LESSON 2: PAST PROGRESSIVE TENSE
  • was/were + -ing form of the main verb
    • The past progressive tense is formed by combining the auxiliary verb with the present
    • participle of verb (-ing form).
    • The past progressive tense is formed by combining the auxiliary verb with the present participle
    • of verb (-ing form).
    • Examples:
      • I was singing when you came.
    • The verb was is the past tense of the verb to “be” and is combined to the present
    • participle of the verb “sing” (actually the –ing form).
    • Each of the highlighted verbs in the following sentences is in the past progressive tense.
      • The cat was walking along the tree branch.
    • This sentence describes an action that took place over a period of continuous time in the
    • past. The cat's actions have no immediate relationship to anything occurring now in the
    • present.
      • Lena was telling a story about the exploits of a red cow when a tree branch broke
      • the parlour window.
    • Here the action "was telling" took place in the past and continued for some time in the
    • past.
    Content Next Back
    • The archivists were eagerly waiting for the delivery of the former prime
    • minister's private papers.
    • Here the ongoing action of "waiting" occurred at some time unconnected
    • to the present.
      • Between 1942 and 1944 the Frank and Van Damm families were hiding in
      • an Amsterdam office building.
    • In this sentence, the action of hiding took place over an extended period
    • of time and the continuing nature of the hiding is emphasized.
    • When the recess bell rang, Jesse was writing a long division problem
    • on the blackboard.
    • This sentence describes actions ("ran" and "was writing") that took
    • place sometime in the past, and emphasises the continuing nature of
    • one of the actions ("was writing").
    Content Next Back Act. 22
  • Objectives:
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • explain the uses of the future progressive
    • tense;
    • differentiate future progressive from simple
    • future tense;
    • answer the activities on the use of future
    • progressive tense skillfully.
    FUTURE PROGRESSIVE TENSE
    • The future progressive tense is used to describe actions ongoing in the
    • future. The future progressive is used to refer to continuing action that will
    • occur in the future. This is formed by using:
    will + be + -ing form of the verb Content Next Back LESSON 3: FUTURE PROGRESSIVE TENSE
    • Each of the highlighted compound verbs in the following sentences is in the
    • future progressive tense.
      • The glee club will be performing at the celebration of the town's
      • centenary.
      • Ian will be working on the computer system for the next two weeks.
      • The selection committee will be meeting every Wednesday morning.
      • We will be writing an exam every afternoon next week.
      • They will be ringing the bells for Hypatia next month.
    • Future progressive tense lets you show that an action will start at some point in the
    • future and will continue indefinitely.
      • Astronauts will be conducting several experiments during the flight.
    • Sometime in the future, the experiments will begin. The experiments will continue
    • into the future.
      • To form this tense, add "-ing" to the present tense and precede it with "will be."
    • In this example, the act of finishing ("will have finished") occurs well before the act
    • of starting ("starts").
      • They will have written their first exam by the time we get out of bed.
    • Here, the act of getting out of bed occurs sometime after the writing of the exam.
    Content Next Back Act. 25
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • define present perfect progressive tense;
    • differentiate present perfect progressive tense
    • from present progressive tense;
    • complete the activity on present perfect
    • progressive tense at the end of the lesson.
    Objectives: PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE
    • Like the present perfect, the present perfect progressive is used to describe
    • an action, event, or condition that has begun in the past and continues into the
    • present. The present perfect progressive, however, is used to stress the on-
    • going nature of that action, condition, or event. This is formed by using:
    has/have + been + -ing form of the main verb Content Next Back LESSON 4: PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE
    • Each of the highlighted verbs in the following sentences is in the present perfect
    • progressive tense and each sentence suggests that the action began in the past and is
    • continuing into the present.
      • That dog has been barking for three hours; I wonder if someone will call the owner.
      • I have been relying on my Christmas bonus to pay for the gifts I buy for my large
      • family.
      • They have been publishing this comic book for ten years.
      • We have been seeing geese flying south all afternoon.
      • Even though the coroner has been carefully examining the corpse discovered in
      • Sutherland's Gully since early this morning, we still do not know the cause of death.
    • Present perfect progressive tense lets you show that an action began sometime in the
    • past, continued uninterrupted up to the present, but probably won't continue into the
    • future. To form this tense, add "-ing" to the present tense of the verb and place "have
    • been" or "has been" in front of it.
      • I have been telling you all along that you need to brush up on your grammar.
      • She has been trying to get a quote from the mayor all morning.
    • Both the telling and the trying began sometime in the past.
    • Both actions continued up to the present, but have now halted.
    Content Next Back Act. 28
  • Objectives:
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • define past perfect progressive tense;
    • differentiate past perfect progressive tense
    • from past progressive tense;
    • improve their skill on the proper use of past
    • perfect progressive tense in sentences.
    PAST PERFECT PROGRESSIVE
    • The past perfect progressive is used to indicate that a continuing
    • action in the past began before another past action began or
    • interrupted the first action. This is formed by using:
    had + been + -ing form of the main verb Content Next Back LESSON 5: PAST PERFECT PROGRESSIVE
    • Each of the highlighted compound verbs in the following sentences is in the
    • past perfect progressive tense.
      • The toddlers had been running around the school yard for ten minutes
      • before the teachers shooed them back inside.
    • Here the action of the toddlers ("had been running") is ongoing in the past
    • and precedes the actions of the teachers ("shooed") which also takes
    • place in the past.
      • We had been talking about repainting the front room for three years and
      • last night we finally bought the paint.
    • In this example, the ongoing action of "talking" precedes another past
    • action ("bought").
      • A construction crew had been digging one pit after another in the middle
      • of my street for three days before they found the water main.
    • Here, the action of digging ("had been digging") took place in the past and
    • occurred over a period of time. The digging was followed by the action of
    • finding ("found").
    Content Next Back
      • The chef's assistant had been chopping vegetables for several minutes
    • before he realized that he had minced his apron strings.
    • This sentence is a bit more complex in that it contains three different
    • past verb tenses. The sequence of tenses conveys a complex set of
    • information. The past perfect progressive ("had been chopping") is used
    • to emphasise the ongoing nature of the past act of chopping. While a
    • second past perfect progressive ("had been mincing") could be used, the
    • past perfect ("had minced") is used to suggest that act of mincing was
    • completed. The simple past ("realized") is used to describe the action
    • closest to the present, an action that followed both the chopping and the
    • mincing.
      • Madeleine had been reading mystery novels for several years before she
    • discovered the works of Agatha Christie.
    • In this sentence the act of discovery ("discovered") occurred in the past
    • but after the ongoing and repeated action of reading ("had been
    • reading").
    • Past progressive tense lets you show that an action began in the past,
    • continued for a time, and then ended sometime prior to the present.
      • Jones was lying the whole time he was on the stand.
      • Jones was on the stand during some period in the past.
    • During that period, he lied continuously.
    Content Next Back Act. 31
    • At the end of the lesson, the students are expected to:
    • widen their knowledge of the structure and
    • format of future prefect progressive;
    • differentiate future perfect progressive tense
    • from future progressive tense;
    • increase their knowledge on the use of future
    • perfect progressive in sentences.
    Objectives: FUTURE PERFECT PROGRESSIVE
    • The future perfect progressive tense is used to indicate a
    • continuing action that will be completed at some specified time in
    • the future. This tense is rarely used. This is formed using:
    will + have + been + -ing form of the main verb Content Next Back LESSON 6: FUTURE PERFECT PROGRESSIVE
    • Each of the highlighted verbs in the following sentences is in the future perfect
    • progressive tense.
      • I will have been studying Greek for three years by the end of this term.
    • In this sentence, the future perfect progressive is used to indicate the ongoing
    • nature of the future act of the studying. The act of studying ("will have been
    • studying") will occur before the upcoming end of term.
      • By the time the meeting is over, the committee will have been arguing about which
      • candidate to interview for three hours.
    • Similarly in this sentence, the ongoing nature of a future act ("will have been arguing")
    • is emphasised by the use of the future perfect progressive. The act of sustained
    • arguing will take place before the meeting is over.
      • When he returns, the wine will have been fermenting for three months.
    • Here the ongoing action of fermentation will precede ("will have been fermenting")
    • the act of returning.
    Content Next Back Act. 34 Chpt. Test
  • References Content Next Back
  • ONLINE RESOURCES TEXT 001. http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/grammar/tenses.html.December 29, 2009 002. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs14.htm.December 29, 2009 003. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs17.htm.December 29, 2009 004. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs29practicetest.htm.December 29, 2009 005. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs30finaltest.htm.December 29, 2009 006. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/presentperfect.html.December 29, 2009 007. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs9.htm.December 29, 2009 008. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs1.htm.December 29, 2009 009. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs4.htm.December 29, 2009 010. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs13.htm.December 29, 2009 011. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs25.htm.December 29, 2009 012. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbs23.htm.December 29, 2009 013. http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbtenseintro.html.December 29, 2009 014. http://www.ncat.edu/~uwc/verb_tenses.pdf..December 29, 2009 Content Next Back
  • ONLINE RESOURCES IMAGES 001. http://images.clipartof.com/small/14677-Happy-Boy-Riding-A-Brand-New-Blue-Bike-Retro-Clipart-Illustration.jpg.January 12, 2010 002. http://images.clipartof.com/small/33045-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-School-Girl-Conducting-A-Science-Experiment-In-A-Lab.jpg.January 12, 2010 003. http://images.clipartof.com/small/32448-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Little-Blond-Boy-Riding-A-White-Horse.jpg.January 12, 2010 004. http://images.clipartof.com/small/38857-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Happy-Boy-Hugging-His-Puppy-On-A-Sunny-Day.jpg.January 12, 2010 005. http://images.clipartof.com/small/32997-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Blond-Boy-Scuba-Diving-And-Taking-Underwater-Pictures.jpg.January 12, 2010 006. http://images.clipartof.com/small/33006-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Little-Blond-Boy-Chopping-Wood-With-An-Ax.jpg.January 12, 2010 007. http://images.clipartof.com/small/32954-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Boy-Fishing-On-The-Shore-Of-A-Still-Lake-On-A-Sunny-Day.jpg.January12, 2010 008. http://images.clipartof.com/small/32868-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Boy-Hiking-With-Gear-On-His-Back-Reading-A-Map.jpg.January 12, 2010 009. http://images.clipartof.com/small/33248-Clipart-Illustration-Of-Little-Red-Riding-Hood-Wearing-Her-Cape-Standing-By-A-Basket.jpg.January12, 2010 010. http://images.clipartof.com/small/32371-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Little-Boy-In-Winter-Clothes-Skiing-Past.jpg.January 12, 2010 011. http://images.clipartof.com/small/33247-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Happy-Little-Girl-Red-Riding-Hood-Picking-Mushrooms-Near-The-Forest.jpg.January 12, 2010 Content Next Back
  • 012. http://images.clipartof.com/small/32940-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Little-Girl-Playing-A-Big-Piano.jpg.January 12, 2010 013. http://images.clipartof.com/small/42006-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Tired-Little-Girl-In-Her-Pajamas-Sleeping-At-Night.jpg.January 12, 2010 014. http://images.clipartof.com/small/42005-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Blond-Little-Girl-Sitting-On-The-Floor-And-Reading-A-Story-Book.jpg.January 12, 2010 015. http://images.clipartof.com/small/41931-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Little-Boy-Smiling-And-Playing-A-Guitar-During-Music-Class.jpg.January 12, 2010 016. http://images.clipartof.com/small/12978-Caucasian-Boy-In-A-Hardhat-Holding-A-Bolt-In-A-Monkey-Wrench-Clipart-Graphic-Illustration.jpg.January 12, 2010 017. http://images.clipartof.com/small/46148-Royalty-Free-RF-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Little-Boy-And-Girl-Sitting-On-The-Floor-And-Reading-A-Fairy-Tale.jpg.January 12, 2010 018. http://images.clipartof.com/small/20750-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Sporty-Girl-In-A-Blue-Uniform-Dribbling-A-Basketball-During-Practice.jpg.January 12, 2010 019. http://images.clipartof.com/small/32953-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Boy-Sitting-On-An-Ice-Chest-While-Ice-Fishing-Reeling-In-A-Little-Fish.jpg.January 12, 2010 020. http://images.clipartof.com/small/64929-Royalty-Free-RF-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Happy-Little-Boy-Sitting-On-A-Stool-And-Painting-On-An-Easel.jpg.January 12, 2010 021. http://images.clipartof.com/small/32875-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Little-Blond-Boy-Taking-Pictures-With-A-Camera-His-Dog-At-His-Side.jpg.January 12, 2010 Content Next Back
  • BOOKS 01. Paterno, Adelaida. and Ramos, Maximo.Enjoying English.Quezon City: R.P. Garcia Publishing Co., 1996. February 4, 2010 02. Yarber, Mary Laine. and Yarber, Robert E. Reviewing Basic Grammar, Fourth Edition. United States: Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers Inc., 1997. January 9, 2010 03. Duckworth, Michael. Oxford Business English Grammar and Practice. China: Oxford University Press, 1995. January 9 2010 04. Guffey, Mary Ellen. Business English. Ohio: South-Western College Publishing, 1996. February 3, 2010 05. Camp, Sue C. and Satterwhite, Marilyn L. College English and Communication, Ninth Edition. The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2007. February 9, 2010 06. Swan, Michael. and Walter, Catherine. How English Works A Grammar Practice Book. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. February 10, 2010. Content Next Back
  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS Judelyn Octia Adorna is a graduate of Bachelor of Secondary Education major in English at Laguna State Polytechnic University. She is the second to the youngest among the four children of Wilfredo Adorna and Liberty Adorna. She was born on the 12 th day of February year 1988. She is presently living with her family at #438 Camia St. Don Felipe Subd. Siniloan, Laguna. She completed her secondary education at Siniloan National High School from 2004-2008 while her elementary education at Buhay Elementary School from 1996-2002. Aivee Labitag De Leon is a graduate of Bachelor of Secondary Education major in English at Laguna State Polytechnic University. She is the eldest among the four children of Macario De Leon and Verjeta De Leon. She was born on the 30 th day of December year 1991. She is presently living with her family in Brgy. Cabooan Santa Maria, Laguna. She completed her secondary education at Siniloan National High School from 2004-2008 while her elementary education at Santa Maria Elementary School from 1998-2004. Content Back