Ethnic Marketing in Canada
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Ethnic Marketing in Canada

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This presentation was given by Environics Research Group (www.environics.ca) Environics Analytics (www.environicsanalytics.ca) and Maple Diversity (www.maplediversity.ca) at the Direct Marketing......

This presentation was given by Environics Research Group (www.environics.ca) Environics Analytics (www.environicsanalytics.ca) and Maple Diversity (www.maplediversity.ca) at the Direct Marketing Breakfast Seminar August 2013

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  • 1. ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA Rupen Seoni Vice President & Practice Leader Robin Brown Senior Vice President, Consumer Insights
  • 2. INTRODUCTIONS Rupen Seoni Vice President & Practice Leader Robin Brown Senior Vice President, Consumer Insights
  • 3. CANADA: A DIVERSE COUNTRY 3
  • 4. VISIBLE MINORITIES MAKE UP ~20% OF CANADA'S POPULATION IN 2013 4 Population by Visible Minority (Canada, 2013) 1,775,426 1,560,677 1,008,393 589,428 427,898 406,914 343,409 236,611 216,659 169,783 100,695 90,930 South Asian Chinese Black Filipino Latin American Arab Southeast Asian West Asian Korean Multiple Japanese All Other Source: Environics Analytics DemoStats 2013
  • 5. - 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 2008 2013 2016 2018 2023 Population(Thousands) South Asian Chinese Filipino Black Latin American VISIBLE MINORITY POPULATION EXPECTED TO GROW IN THE FORESEEABLE FUTURE 5 Projected Visible Minority Population Growth (Top 5 Visible Minority Groups in Canada) Source: Environics Analytics DemoStats 2013
  • 6. VISIBLE MINORITIES ARE ALREADY A MAJORITY IN SOME MUNICIPALITIES 6 73 66 57 54 53 53 32 30 27 24 0 20 40 60 80 100 Markham Brampton Mississauga Vancouver Surrey Toronto Montréal Calgary Edmonton Ottawa 244,112 380,461 428,617 343,164 269,795 1,451,912 531,504 346,339 230,189 220,396 Visible Minority Population % Visible Minority Source: Environics Analytics DemoStats 2013
  • 7. SOME MUNICIPALITIES HAVE HIGHER CONCENTRATIONS OF SPECIFIC VISIBLE MINORITIES 7 39 31 25 21 14 11 7 6 4 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 Brampton Surrey Mississauga Markham Toronto Vaughan Calgary Edmonton Ottawa Montréal South Asian 49 37 35 30 22 13 8 8 7 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 Richmond Markham Burnaby Vancouver Richmond Toronto Mississauga Calgary Edmonton Montréal Chinese 226,304 155,951 189,730 70,371 386,399 34,837 86,123 54,408 36,141 60,444 99,996 122,091 82,507 190,421 43,571 344,935 57,963 88,974 57,306 67,421 % Visible Minority South Asian % Visible Minority Chinese Visible Minority Population Visible Minority Population Source: Environics Analytics DemoStats 2013
  • 8. VISIBLE MINORITIES: AN EXPANDING MARKET 8Source: Environics Analytics HouseholdSpend 2012,2013 9 5 2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 South Asian Chinese Average Canadian % Growth Total Expenditures 2012-2013 ($) $1,176,715 $53,355 $51,032 Total Expenditures (Millions) 9% of Total Canadian Household Expenditures in 2013
  • 9. SPENDING HABITS VARY BY VISIBLE MINORITY 9Source: Environics Analytics HouseholdSpend 2013 Food purchased from stores Personal care Disposable diapers Cell phone and messaging services Internet access services >= 10% <= -10% Chinese South Asian $6,570 $238 -$130 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $1,383 $132 $31 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $45 -$2 $7 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $611 $186 $155 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $343 $50 $33 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld
  • 10. Chinese South Asian $345 $67 $7 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $145 -$11 -$1 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $111 $43 $0 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $95 -$7 -$5 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $3,644 -$321 -$260 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld SPENDING HABITS VARY BY VISIBLE MINORITY 10Source: Environics Analytics HouseholdSpend 2013 Purchase of automobiles Toys and children's vehicles Textbooks Service charges from banks Non-religious charitable organizations >= 10% <= -10%
  • 11. Chinese South Asian $43,196 $20,549 -$3,538 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld Chinese South Asian $7,044 $788 $966 Average Canadian Hhld Difference to Avg Canadian Hhld FINANCIAL HABITS ALSO VARY 11 Credit Card Debt Chequing and Saving Accounts Source: Environics Analytics WealthScapes 2013 >= 10% <= -10%
  • 12. ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA
  • 13. Multicultural Ethnic Diverse New Canadian ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA? Mainstream General Population Foreign Born Visible Minority
  • 14. ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA? 14 Culture
  • 15. Canadian Born 31% Foreign Born 69% Visible Minority Population MIGRATION NATION 15 Canadian Born 16% Foreign Born 84% Adult Visible Minority Population (15+) Source: 2011 National Household Survey
  • 16. ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA? 16 Culture Immigrant Journey
  • 17. ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA? 17 Disorientation Orientation Settlement Belonging Culture Immigrant Journey Consumer Values Language
  • 18. ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA? 18 Immigrant Journey
  • 19. TARGETING NEWCOMERS 20 Pre-Arrival Post-Arrival Intend to buy a vehicle in first year Actually purchase a vehicle in first year66% 42% Intend to buy a minivan3% Buy a minivan11% Intend to buy a used vehicle36% Actually buy a used vehicle78% Intend to buy a Honda14% Actually buy a Honda23% Source: Prepare for Canada New Canadian Voices Automotive Survey 2013
  • 20. ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA? 21 Culture
  • 21. CULTURE: FESTIVALS 22 Made a special shopping trip Took a day off Feel closer to Canadian companies that advertise Saw targeted advertising 87% 95% 38% 50% 43% 60% 80% 45%
  • 22. FOCUS: DIWALI 23 Products Bought Banners Used Clothing $132 Indian Sweets $36 Confectionary $12 40% Ontario West 39% 33% 40% Key Media 35% 24% 20%
  • 23. EXECUTING ETHNIC MARKETING IN CANADA
  • 24. DIWALI – THE FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS 25
  • 25. SOUTH ASIANS ARE TYPICALLY 26  -  Source: Environics Analytics PRIZMC2; PRIZMC2Link2012_PMB_Fall2011  Moderate TV watchers, many watching multicultural stations Light radio listeners Heavy readers of newspapers, dailies Moderate to heavy internet users, web browsing and social networking
  • 26. ACCULTURATION 27Source: Environics Analytics CultureCodes NextGen Pop 227,329 (13%) Fusion Pop 656,352 (37%) Traditionalists Pop 214,584 (12%) Bi-Cultural Pop 480,317 (27%) Newcomers Pop 196,844 (11%)
  • 27. 30
  • 28. 31
  • 29. 32
  • 30. 33
  • 31. Personal Name Family Name Origins Group Language Geography Confidence Score AUNALI DATOO MUSLIMINDIA MUSLIM HINDI SOUTH ASIA 9.76 JIANMING QIAO CHINESE MANDARIN ASIAN: CHINESE CHINESE MANDARIN EAST ASIAN 9.61 MOHAMMADI BEGUM BANGLADESH MUSLIM MUSLIM BENGALI SOUTH ASIA 9.72 CHI-WAI LUI CHINESE CANTONESE ASIAN: CHINESE CHINESE CANTONESE EAST ASIAN 9.69 SEAMUS MCATAMNEY IRELAND CELTIC ENGLISH BRITISH ISLES 9.72 SUBRATA BHATTACHARJEE INDIA BENGALI EAST INDIAN BENGALI SOUTH ASIA 9.69 GREIG SMITH ENGLAND ANGLO-SAXON ENGLISH BRITISH ISLES 9.05 ANGUS ARROL SCOTLAND CELTIC ENGLISH BRITISH ISLES 10.00 TARGETING MAIL CAMPAIGNS 34Source: Origins Canada; Cornerstone Find target population in mailing/customer lists
  • 32. Growth is outpacing the market average by a long shot South Asians & Chinese will continue as largest groups Category and purchase motivations: the devil is really in the details! Lots of data is available for targeting efficiently MULTICULTURAL MARKETS 35
  • 33. RUPEN SEONI VICE PRESIDENT & PRACTICE LEADER 416.969.2837 RUPEN.SEONI@ENVIRONICSANALYTICS.CA ROBIN BROWN SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CONSUMER INSIGHT 416-920-9010 ROBIN.BROWN@ENVIRONICS.CA
  • 34. ETHNIC MARKETING SUCCESSFUL STRATEGIES Timothy Yip Director, Strategic Partnerships & Client Services Niraj Sinha Director, Account & Strategy
  • 35. ETHNIC MARKETING It’s all about seeing the BIG picture and getting it RIGHT!
  • 36. But often we fail to see the BIGGER picture…
  • 37. So what happens when we get it WRONG?
  • 38. Let’s see what didn’t work!
  • 39. Selling ‘Holy Cow’ meat to over 1.5 million South Asians (including Hindus) in Canada? Meat lovers?
  • 40. Great Vodka, Priced Right?
  • 41. Celebrate Diwali….by consuming alcohol?
  • 42. Community Feedback…..
  • 43. It needs to be deeper than just wishing “Happy Diwali” or “Kung Hei Fat Choy” once a year… ….and/or just translating English ads!
  • 44. Let’s see what worked.
  • 45. Case Study #1 - Backed by insights and planning, even unconventional products can work. Case Study #2 – By customizing the product to the occasion and segment, one can do wonders even with a small budget. Case Study #3 – Ethnic marketing doesn’t need to be seen as a stand-alone campaign, it should be part of an overall marketing plan. Case Study #4 – A fully integrated ethnic marketing campaign can help you create a footprint to generate awareness within your target ethnic community.
  • 46. Case Study #1 Backed by the right insights and planning, even unconventional products can work.
  • 47. FRAM CABIN AIR FILTER – CANADIAN TIRE Case Study #1
  • 48. Second largest visible minority group in Canada, largely concentrated in major cities with heavier traffic. Case Study #1
  • 49. Worsening urban air quality in China is one of the leading reasons for immigration to Canada. (2011, Bank of China Survey) Case Study #1
  • 50. Indoor air pollution kills nearly 2.2 million youth in China due to respiratory disorders and other conditions. Case Study #1
  • 51. High ownership of car among Chinese immigrants. Case Study #1
  • 52. A marketing panel and Chinese market experts were consulted. Case Study #1
  • 53. Also included in the panel: Auto workshop owners in Markham, Scarborough and Richmond Hill. Case Study #1
  • 54. Case Study #1 The Message: Did you know that the air quality inside your car is up to 6x dirtier compared to the outside air?
  • 55. * 6 * FRAM® Fresh Breeze® 98%† Arm & Hammer® QR canadiantire.ca/FreshBreeze † † FRAM® * Air Resources Board 1999 † 5–100 microns †† Canadian Tire Canadian Tire Corporation, Limited Client: Canadiantire Project Code: FRAM Description: 4C Print Ad 10x13.5 in (0.25 in Bleed) MDC2013-09-CT-FRAM-SC_CN.indd 1 13-03-26 4:50 PM Case Study #1
  • 56.  Tactical use of selected community in-language newspapers FRAM CABIN AIR FILTER – CANADIAN TIRE The Tactics:
  • 57. The Result: Higher redemption of the campaign coupon within in-language Chinese publications compared to larger mainstream magazines. Case Study #1
  • 58. Case Study #2 Ethnic marketing doesn’t need to be seen as a stand-alone campaign, it can be part of an overall marketing plan.
  • 59. ETHNIC FOOD – SAFEWAY CANADA Case Study #2
  • 60. Case Study #2 The Task: Develop a brand strategy with a cross-cultural appeal, a total store approach and integrate ethnic offerings within current store layouts and formats.
  • 61. Q1: Is there a cultural trend that Safeway can leverage? Case Study #2
  • 62. The great Canadian fusion phenomenon… Canadians are increasingly exposed to different cultures through work, school, friendships, mixed marriages, travel….. … and through food. Case Study #2
  • 63. Case Study #2
  • 64. Q2: Can Safeway be a catalyst for cultural discovery through food? Case Study #2
  • 65. Food is the best window into a culture. Case Study #2
  • 66. Insight: Each time I discover a new ingredient or food, I learn something about the culture it comes from. Proposition: Grocery shopping at Safeway is a journey through different cultures. Case Study #2
  • 67. Case Study #2
  • 68. Fusion cook book Fusion cook-offs Case Study #2
  • 69. Aisle touchscreens to guide shoppers through ingredients, recipes, culture and history. Storytelling - placards at aisles; Live personal storyteller. Case Study #2
  • 70. Cultural themed weeks with samplings and promotions. Case Study #2
  • 71. Social Media activations: Facebook page with content featuring stories, recipes, inspirations, promotions and new offers from Safeway. - A forum for customers to post anecdotes, stories, comments and recipes. Safeway food blog - Inviting customers to blog about the food they discover on their travels. Case Study #2
  • 72. Case Study #3 By customizing the product to the occasion and segment, one can do wonders even with a small budget.
  • 73. QUALITY STREET DIWALI – NESTLÉ CANADA Case Study #3
  • 74. Diwali: Festival of light, shared moments & gifts. Case Study #3
  • 75. Quality Street: Family magnet, crafted for sharing, magical shared moments. Case Study #3
  • 76. Diwali: Celebrations, Family & friends, Gifts Quality Street: Gifts, Magical shared moments Case Study #3
  • 77. Available at Wal-Mart Case Study #3
  • 78. Case Study #3
  • 79.  Print: Tactical use of selected community in-language newspapers  Online: ROS presence on popular South Asian websites – North American and India-based (geo-targeted Canadian IPs only)  Traffic to Quality Street’s Diwali landing page  PR:  Pitch: Special Quality Street Diwali gift packaging from Nestle  Print - News release  Radio - Live RJ feed & interviews  Digital - E-newsletters Media Tactics: Case Study #3
  • 80. PR: Case Study #3
  • 81. The Result: Significant sales recorded in the first 2 weeks of the campaign. Case Study #3
  • 82. Campaign Performance: Nearly 71% in Toronto and 64% in Vancouver ‘liked’ the Quality Street Diwali campaign. Nearly 63% in Toronto and 59% in Vancouver had a much more positive opinion of Quality Street post-campaign. Overall ‘liking’ & ‘relevance’ for the campaign was even higher among new immigrants. Case Study #3
  • 83. Case Study #4 Flexible and cost-effective ethnic media allows greater integration of a campaign.
  • 84. BOLLYWOOD/IIFA – BELL TV Case Study #4
  • 85. Bollywood is the #1 source of entertainment for South Asians. Case Study #4
  • 86. The IIFA is considered ‘The Oscars’ of Bollywood. Case Study #4
  • 87. Bollywood is a major content for South Asian programming provided by Bell TV. Case Study #4
  • 88. Bollywood: A religion for South Asians; main source of entertainment Bell TV: National provider of South Asian programming with Bollywood content Case Study #4
  • 89. How did Bell establish its ‘Bollywood leadership’ with a fraction of the budget spent by brands that sponsored the IIFA? Case Study #4
  • 90. TV PRINT RADIO EVENTS ONLINE PRBollywood news segment sponsorships 360° Case Study #4
  • 91. Case Study #4
  • 92. Case Study #4
  • 93. Direct Marketing Case Study #4
  • 94. Case Study #4
  • 95. Case Study #4
  • 96. Case Study #4
  • 97. To recap the ingredients of a successful ethnic marketing campaign…
  • 98. …insights, planning and flawless execution.
  • 99. 4291 Village Centre Court, Suite 100 Mississauga, ON 905.275.7561