• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Golden Ratio 101
 

Golden Ratio 101

on

  • 1,016 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,016
Views on SlideShare
974
Embed Views
42

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
27
Comments
0

3 Embeds 42

http://creativeactionplanning.com 32
http://www.creativeactionplanning.com 8
http://www.plannersunite.com 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Golden Ratio (0.618) is also known as: golden mean, golden number, golden section, golden proportion, divine proportion, and sectioaurea.  Adding the number 1 to the Golden Ratio = Phi (φ=1.618). Both 0.618 and 1.618 are used interchangeably to represent the golden ratio because they represent the same geometric relationship. (Lidwell, Holden, and Butler, 2010, p.114)Image Source:http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-use-the-golden-ratio.htmlReferencesLidwell, W., K. Holden, and J. Butler. Universal principles of design, 125 ways to enhance usability, influence   perception, increase appeal, make better design decisions, and teach through. Rockport Pub, 2010.
  • In 2008, Vitaly Friedman of Smashing Magazine wrote: “Since the Renaissance, many artists and architects have proportioned their works to approximate the golden ratio — especially in the form of the golden rectangle, in which the ratio of the longer side to the shorter is the golden ratio. The rationale behind it is the belief that this proportion is organic, universal, harmonic and aesthetically pleasing.  Indeed, being evident everywhere in the universe (in fact, many things around us can be expressed in this ratio), divine proportion (which is also called Golden ratio, divine section, golden cut and mean of Phidias) is probably the most known law of proportion which can dramatically improve the communication of your design.”Image and Annotations by Elizabeth BrownReferencesFriedman, Vitaly. Smashing Magazine.Web                      .
  • Smashing Magazine's web layout is well organized and easy to navigate.    Annotations by Elizabeth BrownImage Source: www.smashingmagazine.com
  • The Golden Ratio as seen in the annotated circles that make up the iCloud logo create an aesthetically pleasing and well balanced image. Image Source and Annotations:http://www.quora.com/What-are-some-fine-examples-of-golden-ratio-principles-used-in-web-design
  • This website does not seem to use any type of grid.  Use of the golden ratio could not only make this site easier to look at, but also to help the site owner to better communicate their purpose. Image Source: http://www.businessblunder.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/arngren.png

Golden Ratio 101 Golden Ratio 101 Presentation Transcript

  • How can I increase the appeal of a design? Golden Ratio 101 Brought to you by
  • Golden Ratio is a proportion that can be used to increase the appeal of a design Golden Ratio (0.618) is also known as: golden mean, golden number, golden section, golden proportion, divine proportion, and sectio aurea. Adding the number 1 to the Golden Ratio = Phi (φ=1.618). Both 0.618 and 1.618 are used interchangeably to represent the golden ratio because they represent the same geometric relationship. (Lidwell, Holden, and Butler, 2010, p.114) Image Source: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how- to-use-the-golden-ratio.html
  • In a Golden Ratio the proportion of length and width is the golden ratio In 2008, Vitaly Friedman of Smashing Magazine wrote: “Since the Renaissance, many artists and architects have proportioned their works to approximate the golden ratio — especially in the form of the golden rectangle, in which the ratio of the longer side to the shorter is the golden ratio. The rationale behind it is the belief that this proportion is organic, universal, harmonic and aesthetically pleasing. Indeed, being evident everywhere in the universe (in fact, many things around us can be expressed in this ratio), divine proportion (which is also called Golden ratio, divine section, golden cut and mean of Phidias) is probably the most known law of proportion which can dramatically improve the communication of your design.” Image and Annotations by Elizabeth Brown
  • SmashingMagazine.com uses the Golden Ratio to organize information Smashing Magazine's web layout is well organized and easy to navigate. Annotations by Elizabeth Brown Image Source: www.smashingmagazine.com
  • Apple’s designers use the Golden Ratio in the iCloud logo to create balance The Golden Ratio as seen in the annotated circles that make up the iCloud logo create an aesthetically pleasing and well balanced image. Image Source and Annotations: http://www.quora.com/What- are-some-fine-examples-of-golden-ratio-principles-used-in-web- design
  • A poorly organized website that could benefit from use of the Golden Ratio This website does not seem to use any type of grid. Use of the golden ratio could not only make this site easier to look at, but also to help the site owner to better communicate their purpose. Image Source: http://www.businessblunder.com/wp- content/uploads/2010/09/arngren.png
  • Use these links to learn more about Golden Ratio or even download your own transparent Golden Rectangle to use in your screenshot http://www.joshuagarity.com/web-design/the- golden-ratio/ http://designshack.net/articles/graphics/applyin g-the-golden-ratio-to-your-web- designs/http://designshack.net/articles/graphic s/applying-the-golden-ratio-to-your-web- designs/
  • References Friedman, Vitaly. Smashing Magazine.Web <http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008/05/29/applying-divine- proportion-to-web-design/>. Lidwell, W., K. Holden, and J. Butler. Universal principles of design, 125 ways to enhance usability, influence perception, increase appeal, make better design decisions, and teach through. Rockport Pub, 2010. Brought to you by