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M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation
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M7 A2 Review Paper – Power Point Presentation

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This is a review of my paper on mental health and social stratification in America.

This is a review of my paper on mental health and social stratification in America.

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  • Can there even be a society without stratification?
  • Public education is different for every school district. Funding is different for every school. The state budget may be similar to schools but donations are not.
  • Could the public schools be limiting students options when it comes to college?
  • Manufacturing jobs left many children hurt. The US Supreme Court was forced to create labor laws. But mental stress can still exist.
  • With the economic recession that America is facing there is limited funds to the nation’s infrastructures.
  • Therapists have to use different tactics to deal with children. Often a behavioral approach is used. Even therapy such as art can give a glimpse into a child’s thoughts.
  • Child care should be a concern for the government and more money should be placed into it.
  • The cycle can move through generations and it is possible for many people to get affected in future generations.
  • Medications are only available to those that can afford them. It is true that they increase patient’s options for treatment but they do not put money in people’s pockets.
  • The government giving out food stamps and other aid can allow people to spend more money on health care and proper living expenses.
  • Transcript

    • 1. By Christopher Ruper
    • 2. Social stratification will increase mentalhealth disorders in America. What is social stratification? “Every society is stratified into unequal classes, races, ethnicities, and genders. Structured inequality influences the distribution of wealth, occupational prestige, and power,” (Argosy University, 2011). Social stratification can prevent people from having true equality from one another. “Several factors including relationships of gender, household type, income, occupation and race/ethnicity as part of the social structure identification,” (Rose, 2010).
    • 3. Education Lack of educational opportunities can lead to social stratification and vice versa. “Sociologists have consistently demonstrated that a rather strong association exists between an individuals social class origin and their social class destination, even after controlling for educational attainment,” (Jackson, 2009).
    • 4. Education cont. Education has become a larger part in determining one’s social standing. It creates better opportunities for people and education typically produces more income. However, college degree attainment is not spread equally across America. “An unresolved question is whether this pattern is primarily explained by differences in priorities and preferences across social strata or whether the widely recognized flaws of the education system itself are actively hindering an otherwise more egalitarian outcome,” (Reisel, 2010).
    • 5. Employment Education can lead to better job opportunities in America Lacking an education can lead to poor job placement/opportunities. Poor job placement/opportunities can to jobs that are unsafe. “It is the poor who are exposed to dangerous environments, who (if employed) often have stressful, unrewarding and depersonalizing work, who lack the necessities and amenities of life and who, because they are not part of the mainstream of society, are isolated from information and support,” (Murali and Oyebode, 2011).
    • 6. Poverty the vicious cycle It is common that more people are at the bottom of the social standing in America. Few people control most of the wealth in America. Which leaves some to fend and struggle by themselves. Often times poverty extends to future generations. “Those who live in deprived communities, where there is under-investment in the social and physical infrastructure, experience poor health, resulting in higher mortality for those of lower socio-economic class,” (Murali and Oyebode, 2011).
    • 7. Poverty the vicious cycle cont. Along with physical health, mental health is a great concern for children. Kataoka and associates did a study for 12 months to find the amount of mental health care being given to children.  “In a 12-month period, 2%–3% of children 3–5 years old and 6%–9% of children and adolescents 6–17 years old used mental health services. Of children and adolescents 6–17 years old who were defined as needing mental health services, nearly 80% did not receive mental health care,” (Kataoka and Associates, 2002).  It was also found that the unmet needs of children were higher in minorities when compared to Caucasian children. Social stratification leaves minority children particularly vulnerable to mental health concerns.
    • 8. Birth defects Birth defects can cause a wide range of mental health disorders. In regards to poverty, children have a much higher rate of birth defects in lower income families than in higher income families. Learning disabilities can cause children to have health and educational disadvantages; especially when left untreated. Even when being treated one study found that children had, “1.5 times more doctor visits, 3.5 times more hospital- days, twice the number of school-days lost, and a 2.5-fold increase in the likelihood of repeating a grade in school compared with children without these conditions,” (Boyle, Decoufle, and Yeargin-Allsopp, 1994).
    • 9. Birth defects cont. Mental health disorders, treated or not, can have an effect on the education that the children are suppose to receive because of their growth/development, emotional, and behavioral problems. These can cause a higher rate of lower educational opportunities. Lower educational opportunities can lead to lower income and poverty for children when they grow into adulthood; the cycle continues.
    • 10. Health Care The mental health community has been using more medications to treat patients every year. Minorities and lower income families still remain behind in medical coverage. People in low income families do not have the same advantages to health care as higher income families. This includes mental health care. “Despite informal exemptions, out-of-pocket payments for health care are exacting a high toll on household welfare with households being forced to sell assets or go into debt to meet the costs of care,” (Falkingham, 2004).
    • 11. Resolution Social stratification in America produces poverty and mental health disorders. Whether a disorder is created, from birth or through living in poverty environments, people at the bottom suffer. Poverty and mental health disorders are a nationwide problem in America. It is the responsibility of America’s leader to provide aid and not “band aids” to help the people who are suffering. More research needs to be done so this task can be accomplished; especially in: “...food stamps, managed care, disability, aging, the change from a budget deficit to a budget surplus, the latest figures on poverty, and the latest information on job training and employment,” (Dinitto, 2011).
    • 12. References Argosy University (2011). Advanced General Psychology. Argosy University. Retrieved on November 12, 2011 from www.myeclassonline.com Argosy University (2011). Sociological Perspective class ethnicity and gender. Argosy University. Retrieved on November 12, 2011 from www.myeclassonline.com Bolye, C., Decoufle, M., Yeargin-Allsopp, M. (1994). Prevalence and Health Impact of Developmental Disabilities in US Children. American Academy of Pediatrics, 93(3), 399-403. Dinitto, D. (2011). Social Welfare 5th Ed. Lavoisier S.A.S. Retrieved from http://www.lavoisier.fr/livre/notice.asp?id=O3OWA3A6KAKOWF Falkingham, J. (2003). Poverty, out-of-pocket payments and access to health care. Social Science and Medicine, 58(2), 247-258. Doi: 10.1016/s0277-9536(03)00008.x
    • 13. References cont. Jackson, M. (2009). Disadvantaged through discrimination? The role of employers in social stratification. British Journal Of Sociology, 60(4), 669-692. doi:10.1111/j.1468-4446.2009.01270.x Kataoka, S. and Associates (2002). Unmet Need for Mental Health Care Among U.S. Children: Variation by Ethnicity and Insurance Status. The American Journal of Psychiatry. 159(9). Doi:159:1548-1555 Murali, V. and Oyebode, F. (2011). Poverty, social inequality, and mental health. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment. Retrieved from http://apt.rcpsych.org/content/10/3/216.full Reisel, L. (2010). Higher education and welfare state regimes: A comparative study of social stratification and educational outcomes in the united states and norway. Sociology). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/763428151?accountid=34899 Rose, S. J. (2010). Social Stratification in the United States. Environment & Planning A, 42(8), 1767-1768. doi:10.1068/a42274

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