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Group 1:
Jerry Dugan, Heather Judkins, José Ramirez, Maria Silva
& Raymond Soto
 California children (for all grades) need to achieve an API (Academic
Performance Index) score of 800 to be considered “...
-200
-150
-100
-50
0
50
 “California's educational system suffers from a racial/ethnic
achievement gap that causes students of color to be consis...
 Impact of culture and poverty is outlined in the following charts as published
by the 2007 National Assessment of Educat...
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
39%
12% 18%
41%
17%
Impact of Culture
(North Carolina 2008)
* Test scores in North Carolina demonst...
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
Students
in Poverty
Students
NOT in
Poverty
16%
41%
Impact of Poverty
(North Carolina 2008)
* Impac...
 Curriculum – Subjects/concepts are covered quickly without focusing on
student understanding. If a student doesn’t “get ...
.
Deficit model of thinking
Students of poverty and diverse cultures have
deficits
List of characteristics
 Poor vocab...
.
Programs have evolved, but are they the best
approach.
 Ex. Ruby Payne’s, A Framework for Understanding
Poverty (Payne...
.
 Valencia writes “. . .deficit thinking is an explanation of
school failure among individuals linked to . . . Racial/et...
 Paul Gorski “The Myth of the Culture of Poverty”
 “suggests that instead of accepting myths that harm low-
income stude...
Impacts on achievement
 Poverty (ES = .76)
 Racial gaps
 Study done by Richard Coley (Educational Testing Services)
 ...
 Funded by NCLB Act.
 Its purpose is to serve students of poverty.
 Funds are provided base on the number of students w...
High poverty schools that receive Title I
funding are mandated to have “highly qualified
teachers.”
Designed for catching up and reinforcement of
scholastic material.
Works best when implemented by
knowledgeable teachers...
 Provided when schools are not meeting “adequate yearly
progress” (AYP).
Four Main
Areas to
Consider
Culture Trumps
Poverty
-200
-150
-100
-50
0
50
Poor White
Students
scored 33
points below
benchmark.
Culture Trumps
Poverty
Current Efforts
• Focused on
poverty needs
• Pushes the
HOW and
WHAT
Needed Efforts
• Cultural
need...
Collectivist
Culture
70%
Individualistic
Values
30%
World Pop.
Collectivist Culture
Interdependence
Communication
• 1st Re...
“Both/And” is Possible
Collectivist Culture
Environment
AND
Individualistic
Accountability
Mathemathics &
Science
Hands-on
Innovation
 We need to guide the thinking process with attention to
meaning making.
 We need to guide the thinking process with attention to meaning
making.
 We need to attend to the context and culture o...
 We need to guide the thinking process with attention to meaning
making.
 We need to attend to the context and culture o...
 We need to guide the thinking process with attention to
meaning making.
 We need to attend to the context and culture o...
 We need to guide the thinking process with attention to meaning
making.
 We need to attend to the context and culture o...
American education is at a We can continue to make changes that
address
the needs of to improve achievement but that doesn...
We must create the conditions in our K-12 schools to allow entry
into
a means of entry to the to for
middle class to susta...
who are not provided
an
that builds resilience to
overcome the circumstances of their birth are not given the opportunity
...
In the country with the most abundance
of
we can no longer
educationally
address only the needs
of
Our needs to provide eq...
Relationship of Culture and Poverty in Education
Relationship of Culture and Poverty in Education
Relationship of Culture and Poverty in Education
Relationship of Culture and Poverty in Education
Relationship of Culture and Poverty in Education
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Relationship of Culture and Poverty in Education

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Group presentation in a Masters Degree level course about equality in education. This slideshow is a summary of Chapter 1 from Closing the Poverty & Culture Gap: Strategies to Reach every Student by Donna Walker Tileston and Sandra K. Karling.

Published in: Education, Technology
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Relationship of Culture and Poverty in Education

  1. 1. Group 1: Jerry Dugan, Heather Judkins, José Ramirez, Maria Silva & Raymond Soto
  2. 2.  California children (for all grades) need to achieve an API (Academic Performance Index) score of 800 to be considered “acceptable.”
  3. 3. -200 -150 -100 -50 0 50
  4. 4.  “California's educational system suffers from a racial/ethnic achievement gap that causes students of color to be consistently outperformed by their white peers even when controlling for poverty.” (2008) Basically, students from diverse cultures that are NOT living in poverty are performing below White students who are poor.  This issue doesn’t just apply to California….
  5. 5.  Impact of culture and poverty is outlined in the following charts as published by the 2007 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).  There is a gap in achievement due to both culture and poverty regardless of which results we examine. State tests and national tests both yield these same results.
  6. 6. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 39% 12% 18% 41% 17% Impact of Culture (North Carolina 2008) * Test scores in North Carolina demonstrate the same discrepancy as those in California.
  7. 7. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Students in Poverty Students NOT in Poverty 16% 41% Impact of Poverty (North Carolina 2008) * Impact of poverty – 25 points discrepancy.
  8. 8.  Curriculum – Subjects/concepts are covered quickly without focusing on student understanding. If a student doesn’t “get it,” we assume they will understand next time as it spirals around again.  Instruction – Which instructional strategies for our curriculum will work best for our students? Have teachers received proper professional development for the State Standards?  Assessment – Many assessments used (benchmark, textbook assessments, state mandated testing, etc.) but are the results being used as they should be? What is being done with the information gathered?
  9. 9. . Deficit model of thinking Students of poverty and diverse cultures have deficits List of characteristics  Poor vocabulary  Lack of background knowledge  Being inattentive  Involvement with gangs and drugs
  10. 10. . Programs have evolved, but are they the best approach.  Ex. Ruby Payne’s, A Framework for Understanding Poverty (Payne, 2005)  Authors Bomer and colleagues examined Ruby Payne’s framework  What patterns are detectable in Payne’s truth claims about children’s lives in poverty?  To what extent are those truth claims supported by existing research?
  11. 11. .  Valencia writes “. . .deficit thinking is an explanation of school failure among individuals linked to . . . Racial/ethnic minority status and economic disadvantage.”  Children’s low performance is linked to cognitive and motivational deficits.  This approach places the blame of low performance on the student not the school.
  12. 12.  Paul Gorski “The Myth of the Culture of Poverty”  “suggests that instead of accepting myths that harm low- income students, we need to eradicate the system wide inequities that stand in their way.”
  13. 13. Impacts on achievement  Poverty (ES = .76)  Racial gaps  Study done by Richard Coley (Educational Testing Services)  “The Family: America’s Smallest School”  One parent home  Eighth graders who are absent at least three times a month  Five or younger who's parents read to them daily  Eighth graders who watch five or more hours of T.V.
  14. 14.  Funded by NCLB Act.  Its purpose is to serve students of poverty.  Funds are provided base on the number of students who receive free and reduced lunch.  The largest federal elementary and secondary education program.  Portions of the fund are allocated for further professional development of teachers.  Funds are focused to help students mainly in reading and mathematics.  Has been credited with closing the achievement gaps between advantaged and disadvantaged students.
  15. 15. High poverty schools that receive Title I funding are mandated to have “highly qualified teachers.”
  16. 16. Designed for catching up and reinforcement of scholastic material. Works best when implemented by knowledgeable teachers, who know all of their students’ needs.
  17. 17.  Provided when schools are not meeting “adequate yearly progress” (AYP).
  18. 18. Four Main Areas to Consider
  19. 19. Culture Trumps Poverty -200 -150 -100 -50 0 50 Poor White Students scored 33 points below benchmark.
  20. 20. Culture Trumps Poverty Current Efforts • Focused on poverty needs • Pushes the HOW and WHAT Needed Efforts • Cultural needs of learner • Ask WHY?
  21. 21. Collectivist Culture 70% Individualistic Values 30% World Pop. Collectivist Culture Interdependence Communication • 1st Relationship • 2nd Content
  22. 22. “Both/And” is Possible Collectivist Culture Environment AND Individualistic Accountability
  23. 23. Mathemathics & Science Hands-on Innovation
  24. 24.  We need to guide the thinking process with attention to meaning making.
  25. 25.  We need to guide the thinking process with attention to meaning making.  We need to attend to the context and culture of our students of poverty.
  26. 26.  We need to guide the thinking process with attention to meaning making.  We need to attend to the context and culture of our students of poverty.  We need to use technology at the point of instruction and for demonstrating learning for our digital students.
  27. 27.  We need to guide the thinking process with attention to meaning making.  We need to attend to the context and culture of our students of poverty.  We need to use technology at the point of instruction and for demonstrating learning for our digital students.  We need to provide opportunities for small group work with individual accountability built into it.
  28. 28.  We need to guide the thinking process with attention to meaning making.  We need to attend to the context and culture of our students of poverty.  We need to use technology at the point of instruction and for demonstrating learning for our digital students.  We need to provide opportunities for small group work with individual accountability built into it.  We need to use strategies that allow students to “think out loud” and to process their thinking together to make meaning.
  29. 29. American education is at a We can continue to make changes that address the needs of to improve achievement but that doesn’t address the needs of our increasing diverse However, the consequences for ignoring the educational differences and needs of children of poverty will impact all of us. For America to maintain its place in a we need all of our children to be productive members of society. They need beyond in order to compete.
  30. 30. We must create the conditions in our K-12 schools to allow entry into a means of entry to the to for middle class to sustain a democracy. We can no longer accept the old paradigm model that holds low expectations for We need a substantial We can no longer blame We know what works; we need the moral courage to implement it.
  31. 31. who are not provided an that builds resilience to overcome the circumstances of their birth are not given the opportunity to contribute the assets that they bring We need to invest in them, learn from them, and we will all benefit. to this country. who do not achieve in school our social services and our health care system and fill our
  32. 32. In the country with the most abundance of we can no longer educationally address only the needs of Our needs to provide equal access to a quality education for all of its children. We all deserve no less.

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