Pharmacy and social media. Mr Arcelio Benetoli, Faculty of Pharmacy

691 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
691
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Pharmacy and social media. Mr Arcelio Benetoli, Faculty of Pharmacy

  1. 1. Pharmacy and Social Media Benetoli A, Chen TF, Aslani P Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia Background Results  The Internet is a source of health information for pharmacists and patients.  22 studies identified (Fig 1), covering SM as a general concept, and focusing on specific SM types.  During the last decade, the Internet has advanced to Web 2.0 which has predominantly user generated content.  Social media (SM) is a group of websites whose multimedia content (e.g. texts, images, audios, videos) are created and exchanged by users.  SM comprises:  content-sharing applications, such as Blogs, Wikis, YouTube;  Social Networking Sites (SNS), relationship-building applications, such as Facebook, Google+.  SM can be used by pharmacists in a professional capacity and as an educational tool. Fig 1. Types of social media used  Facebook was the most commonly studied SM platform (Fig 2). Aims  The majority of studies determined the use of SM by pharmacists, pharmacy educators and students (Fig 3).  This review aims to systematically assess the use of social media in professional pharmacy practice and pharmacy education.  Pharmacist, pharmacy educators, and students used SM mainly for personal reasons.  SM was used in education as elective courses, using Facebook, Wikis or Twitter.  One third of studies used SM as an educational intervention (fig 3). Methods  Literature review on social media and pharmacy using PRISMA guidelines.  Pharmacists did not use, and were unwilling to use, social media in a professional capacity.  Databases: Medline, Embase, PubMed, IPA, and CINAHL.  Peer-reviewed research included, since 2000. papers  Key word categories used: social AND pharmacist media or student AND pharmacy Fig 2. Representation of Facebook prominence in the studies retrieved Fig 3. Studies’ main focus Conclusions  Social media has been adopted into pharmacy education with different approaches.  No study was identified that addressed the delivery of pharmacy services through social media. Scholarship funding: CNPq Brazilian Government Program “Science Without Borders” correspondence: aben3861@uni.sydney.edu.au

×