Social Media and Medicine

6,153 views

Published on

Lecture at the 2011 Joint Philippine Lipid & Atherosclerosis Society & Philippine Society of Hypertension Annual Convention

Published in: Health & Medicine

Social Media and Medicine

  1. 1. Social Media & Medicine Iris Thiele Isip Tan MD, FPCP, FPSEM MS Health Informatics (cand.) Clinical Associate Professor, UP College of MedicineSection of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, Philippine General Hospital http://blog.thoughtpick.com/2010/11/10-must-know- http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthamm/2945559128/ advantages-disadvantages-of-social-media.html
  2. 2. Social MediaInternet-basedapplications that allowthe creation andexchange of user-generated content http://www.blogcatalog.com/blogs/webdesign-social-marketing- gadget-tech-and-web-20-news Accessed 27 Jan 2011 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_media
  3. 3. http://www.techdigest.tv/ http://bartelme.at/journal/archive/2009/06/ten_great_reaso.html twitter_replacement_icon Content Blogs & communities microblogs http://technorati.com/ blogging/article/facebook- posting-trips-up-woman-in/Collaborative Social projects networking sites http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ File:Wikipedia-logo-v2.svgSocial Virtual Virtual communities media game worlds http://en.wikipedia.org/ http://unconwtech.free.fr/ wiki/Social_media technologies/
  4. 4. Impact on the practice of medicinehttp://eyecareprofessionalsgroup.com/blog/ Opportunity to reach out to patientshttp://images.businessweek.com/ss/09/10/1006_twitterville/17.htm Caveats and pitfallshttp://www.watblog.com/tag/facebook-privacy/
  5. 5. Web 1.0 vs Web 2.0 by Andre Pan, 5 Sept 2006.http://www.flickr.com/photos/popoever/234877734/
  6. 6. Eysenbach G. J Med Internet Res 2008;10(3)
  7. 7. Participatory MedicinePatient has an active role in medical decision making
  8. 8. Digital Native“native speaker” of thedigital language of theInternetDigital Immigrantnot born in the digitalworld but haveadopted newtechnology Prensky M. “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants” From On the Horizon NCB University Press 9(5), Oct 2001
  9. 9. e-PatientUse web to gather informationSeek online guidanceDemand better health informationand servicesInsist on a different relationshipwith their doctors Coffield RL et al. Risky Business: Treating Tweeting the Symptoms of Social Media. AHLA Connections March 2010;10-14
  10. 10. Physician Networking SitesSermo MD members discuss clinical issuesMedpedia Collaborative encyclopedia (Harvard Medical School, UC-Berkeley School of Public Health, Stanford Medical School and the University of Michigan Medical School)iMedExchange Doctors’ lounge and info resourceOzmosis “Social Media and Medicine” in New England Journal of Medicine Career Center Mar 2010 at http://www.nejmjobs.org
  11. 11. MedPedia Hypertension Community For patients, providers and caregivershttp://www.medpedia.com/communities/630-Hypertension
  12. 12. Business Model Sermo Provides companies access to physician discussions Allows companies to post information on the site Sells reports on exchanges on clinical topics Gives honoraria to MDs who participate in surveys, panels and case conferences “Social Media and Medicine” in New England Journal of Medicine Career Center Mar 2010 at http://www.nejmjobs.org
  13. 13. http://pinoy.md
  14. 14. Impact on the practice of medicinehttp://eyecareprofessionalsgroup.com/blog/ Opportunity to reach out to patientshttp://images.businessweek.com/ss/09/10/1006_twitterville/17.htm Caveats and pitfallshttp://www.watblog.com/tag/facebook-privacy/
  15. 15. Facebook Fan Page
  16. 16. Facebook Fan Page
  17. 17. Facebook Fan Page
  18. 18. HealthSeeker
  19. 19. HealthSeeker
  20. 20. HealthSeeker
  21. 21. HealthSeeker
  22. 22. Disaster alerting and response Location awareness during crisis Blood glucose tracking Mood tracking for bipolar disorder Adverse event reporting Daily health tips Drug safety alerts Environmental alerts 140 Health Care Uses of Twitter http://philbaumann.com/2009/01/16/140-health-care-uses-for-twitter/ http://techcrunch.com/2010/09/14/the-new-twitter/
  23. 23. Twitter
  24. 24. Twitter
  25. 25. Twitter
  26. 26. 540 US Hospitals using socialmedia tools!247 YouTube channels316 Facebook pages419 Twitter accounts67 blogs Coffield RL et al. Risky Business: Treating Tweeting the Symptoms of Social Media. AHLA Connections March 2010;10-14
  27. 27. Began podcasting in 2005Most popular medical provider channel on YouTube 100,000 followers on Twitter Facebook page with over 30,000 connections Pioneer in hospital blogging
  28. 28. MissionLead the social media revolution in health care, contributing to health and well being for people everywhere VisionMayo clinic will be the authentic voice for patients and health care professionals, building relationships through the revolutionary power of social media
  29. 29. A virtual place for the Clinic’s community of patients(500,000 unique patients from 150 countries yearly) to connect and share their expensesOnline companion to newsletter Sharing Mayo Clinic Hub that links to YouTube and Facebook
  30. 30. Mayo Clinic PodcastsMedical and Health Podcasts from Mayo Clinic
  31. 31. Mayo Clinic NewsMedical and Scientific News and Stories about Mayo Clinic Medical Experts for Media List of Mayo Clinic medical experts to help journalists working on health and science stories
  32. 32. Impact on the practice of medicinehttp://eyecareprofessionalsgroup.com/blog/ Opportunity to reach out to patientshttp://images.businessweek.com/ss/09/10/1006_twitterville/17.htm Caveats and pitfallshttp://www.watblog.com/tag/facebook-privacy/
  33. 33.   "Be civil to all;sociable to many;familiar with few; friend to one; enemy to none."   Benjamin Franklin http://smallbiztrends.com/2011/01/social-media- analytics-6-steps-measuring.html
  34. 34. Physicians should be cognizant of standards of patientprivacy and confidentiality that must be maintained inall environments, including online, and must refrain from posting identifiable patient information online. AMA Policy:Professionalism in the Use of Social Media American Medical Association, Oct 2010
  35. 35. When using the Internet for social networking, physicians should useprivacy settings to safeguard personal information and content to the extent possible, but should realize privacy settings are not absolute and that once on the Internet, content is likely there permanently. Thus physicians should routinely monitor their own Internet presence to ensure that the personal and professional information in their own sites and, to the extent possible, content posted about them by others, is accurate and appropriate. AMA Policy:Professionalism in the Use of Social Media American Medical Association, Oct 2010
  36. 36. Yelp A social rating site Patient criticized SF chiropractor’s billing practicesJan 2009 Charges of defamation-libel and invasion of privacy Coffield RL et al. Risky Business: Treating Tweeting the Symptoms of Social Media. AHLA Connections March 2010;10-14
  37. 37. Anti-defamation serviceContract provisions restricting a patient’s right to make negative comments on rating websites “The gag contract Wall of Shame” Coffield RL et al. Risky Business: Treating Tweeting the Symptoms of Social Media. AHLA Connections March 2010;10-14
  38. 38. If they interact with patients on the Internet, physicians must maintain appropriate boundaries of the patient-physician relationship in accordance with professional ethical guidelines just, as they would in any other context. AMA Policy:Professionalism in the Use of Social Media American Medical Association, Oct 2010
  39. 39. Online “messages” between an MD and his “friend” onFacebook creates an electronic record of the exchange Can potentially support existence a physician-patient relationship Can create liability (HIPAA, medical malpractice, patient abandonment, etc. Coffield RL et al. Risky Business: Treating Tweeting the Symptoms of Social Media. AHLA Connections March 2010;10-14
  40. 40. DISCLAIMER The site and the information contained therein is made available by the author for educational purposes only and is not intended to provide medical advice. By accessing the site, you understandand acknowledge that there is no physician-patient relationship between you and the author. You further acknowledge your understanding that the site should not be used as a substitute for competent medical advice from a licensed physician in your state. Always read the Terms of Use!
  41. 41. To maintain appropriate professional boundaries physicians should consider separating personal and professional content online. AMA Policy:Professionalism in the Use of Social Media American Medical Association, Oct 2010
  42. 42. Should superiors “friend” or “follow” subordinates? Can trigger or exacerbate legal claims(harassment, discrimination or wrongful termination) What would you do? You see a post on a colleague’s Facebook wall indicating that he has been drinking alcohol recently ... and you know that he is or has been on call? Coffield RL et al. Risky Business: Treating Tweeting the Symptoms of Social Media. AHLA Connections March 2010;10-14
  43. 43. When physicians see content posted by colleagues thatappears unprofessional they have a responsibility to bring that content to the attention of the individual, so that he or she can remove it and/or take other appropriate actions. If the behavior significantly violated professional norms and the individual doesnot take appropriate action to resolve the situation, the physician should report the matter to appropriate authorities. AMA Policy:Professionalism in the Use of Social Media American Medical Association, Oct 2010
  44. 44. Physicians must recognize that actions online andcontent posted may negatively affect their reputations among patients and colleagues, may haveconsequences for their medical careers (particularly for physicians-in-training and medical students), and can undermine public trust in the medical profession. AMA Policy:Professionalism in the Use of Social Media American Medical Association, Oct 2010
  45. 45. Report from 60% of US medical schools Violation of patient confidentiality 13% Use of profanity 52% Frankly discriminatory language 48% Depiction of intoxication 39% Sexually suggestive material 38% Chretien KC et al. JAMA 2009; 30(12):1309-1315
  46. 46. Guidelines for Networking SitesDavid H. Brendel MD, PhDChair of McLean Hospital’s Institutional Review BoardAddress a patient’s online invitation immediately and inperson to avoid damaging the therapeutic relationship.Do not include information obtained through socialnetworking websites to a patient’s medical record withouttheir consent.Use discretion when posting personal information online.Understand the privacy policies available on socialnetworking websites and use them to limit access topersonal information. Physicians Using Social Media, March 2010 at http://iconsinmedicine.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/physicians-using-social-media/
  47. 47. Develop a Social Media PolicyBe transparent and authenticNever represent yourself in a false wayDon’t betray a patient’s or colleague’s trustBe responsible for what you writeBe authentic and consider your audienceProtect confidential and proprietary informationPost factual, meaningful and courteous commentsUse common sense and common courtesyAdd value to yourself and your companyFind the proper balance between your use of social media and yourother work Coffield RL et al. Risky Business: Treating Tweeting the Symptoms of Social Media. AHLA Connections March 2010;10-14
  48. 48. Impact on the practice of medicinehttp://eyecareprofessionalsgroup.com/blog/ Opportunity to reach out to patientshttp://images.businessweek.com/ss/09/10/1006_twitterville/17.htm Caveats and pitfallshttp://www.watblog.com/tag/facebook-privacy/
  49. 49. !ank Y"http://www.endocrine-witch.net

×