Michael ward food_safety_systems_for_livestock_production

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From the Food Security Forum 2014: Good food, good health: delivering the benefits of food
security in Australia and beyond - 17 March 2014

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Michael ward food_safety_systems_for_livestock_production

  1. 1. Food safety systems for livestock production: From A to Z Michael Ward | Veterinary Public Health & Food Safety
  2. 2. Food Security and Disease 2 › access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life › food security threatened by diseases  production  access  quality
  3. 3. 3 › animal diseases and food security › production- and reproduction-limiting diseases › e.g. internal parasites, brucellosis, tuberculosis › transboundary diseases and food security › food distribution networks and non-tariff trade barriers › e.g. foot-and-mouth disease, BSE (mad cow disease) › zoonoses and food security › direct hazards to human health (± production-, trade-limiting) Food Security and Animal Disease
  4. 4. Anthropozoonosis • Maintenance cycle: animal to animal • Zoonotic cycle: animal to human Source: Supercourse – Epidemiology, the Internet and Global Health What is a Zoonotic Disease 4
  5. 5. www.cdc.gov/nczved/ dfbmd/disease_listing/stec_gi.html#3
  6. 6. 8
  7. 7. Hazard versus Risk 9 August 30, 2011, San Diego CA. Ralph Collier of the Shark Research Committee estimated the shark to be a 10-12 ft long Great White. No surfer was touched by the shark and few seemed aware of it’s presence. http://surftherenow.com.
  8. 8. 10 http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/sharks/attacks/relarisklifetime.html Heart disease …….. 1 in 5 Cancer …….. 1 in 7 Stroke …….. 1 in 24 Hospital infections ..….. 1 in 38 Flu …….. 1 in 63 Shark attack …….. 1 in 3,748,067 Hazard versus Risk
  9. 9. 11 http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/breakfast/the-risks-of-a-shark-attack/5253676 Hazard versus Risk
  10. 10. 12 The risk of being attacked by a Great White shark off a WA beach has climbed to one in a million. Read more: http://www.watoday.com.au/wa-news/risk-of-fatal-shark-attack-doubles-in-wa-20121126-2a3ip.html#ixzz2viS4Z1Er Hazard versus Risk
  11. 11. “farm-to-fork”, “gate-to-plate” → opportunities for disease control: - pre-harvest: ↓ pathogen load - post-harvest (MOSS, HACCP, QC …): ↓ contamination Control of food-borne diseases 13
  12. 12. Food safety surveillance: FOODNET › CDC / USDA jointly operated › active surveillance - Campylobacter - Salmonella - Shigella - Shiga Toxin-producing E coli - Listeria - Vibrio - Yersinia - Cryptosporidium - Cyclospora 14
  13. 13. Food safety surveillance: OZ foodnet - Campylobacter - Salmonella - Typhoid - Shigella - Shiga Toxin-producing E coli - Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome - Listeria - Hepatitis A 15
  14. 14. 16
  15. 15. http://www.cdc.gov/nczved/dfbmd/disease_listing/stec_gi.html#3 The burden of illness pyramid is a model for understanding food borne disease reporting. Burden of illness pyramid 17
  16. 16. › national baseline microbiological surveys of Australian red meat - 1993-94, 1998, 2004 › chilled carcases, frozen boneless - 75% and 78% of Australia’s beef and sheep throughput › sample numbers proportional to processor’s volume Monitoring of food-borne pathogens: an example 18
  17. 17. Food safety risk assessment 19
  18. 18. 20
  19. 19. 21
  20. 20. Zoonoses in the developing world › US$20 billion direct, US$200 billion indirect costs on global economies during past decade World Bank: People, Pathogens and Our Planet. Washington: 2010 › zoonoses ↓ human health, ↓ income, ↓ status › low and middle income countries ‒ high dependency on animals - food, transport, draft power … - 500‒900 million poor raise livestock - close contact with animals in poor rural areas, urban slums › increased risk of food-borne diseases - poor food safety systems - unhealthy livestock products that cannot be marketed e.g. anthrax 22
  21. 21. Panic as anthrax kills two news update By Boniface Gikandi and Amos Kareithi Two people have died following an anthrax outbreak in Maragua and Samburu districts. A 73-year-old man died on Monday while undergoing treatment at Murang'a District Hospital while a seven-year-old boy died in Samburu district. The man, Kamau Kega, was among the first victims to test positive for the anthrax virus following an outbreak in Ichagaki location in Maragua. 23
  22. 22. 24 Increasing recognition of food-borne zoonoses
  23. 23. 25 developing  developed country quantity  quality low food safety  high food safety expectations expectations Food safety systems: From A to Z
  24. 24. 26 Food safety systems: From A to Z
  25. 25. access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life Food safety versus Food security Food safety and Food security 27
  26. 26. Food safety systems for livestock production: From A to Z Michael Ward | Veterinary Public Health & Food Safety

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