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Identifying Mobile Processes in a Complex Information System
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Identifying Mobile Processes in a Complex Information System

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Slaven Brumec - presentation from IIS 2007 conference

Slaven Brumec - presentation from IIS 2007 conference

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  • The main goal of new Cadastral Enterprise Information Portal, developed by APIS IT, is to integrate spatial and non-spatial data on one place and present them on Intranet network of Cadastral office. It has to be point of access to the new information system, which will consolidate data from different resources and present and future databases.

Transcript

  • 1. Identifying Mobile Processes in a Complex Information System Slaven Brumec APIS IT, Zagreb, Croatia
  • 2. Wiberg, 1999 “ Anytime, anywhere” does not necessarily mean “ everytime, everywhere”
  • 3. Introduction
    • Information systems (IS) should support the entirety of an organization’s business processes.
    • Some business processes take place in uncertain locations and are executed by mobile users.
    • Mobile technologies can be and are successfully used for support of such business processes.
    • Most efficient usage of mobile technologies in such scenarios usually cannot be accomplished by merely adding mobile components to stationary IS.
    • Good business results can be obtained with mobile technology usage relying on powerful business databases and other stationary elements of IS.
  • 4. Problems...
    • Comprehensive approach to the development of IS that has both stationary and mobile components should be taken.
    • There is need for methodology for precise identification of those business processes (from among the total set of processes within an organization) in which the usage of mobile technologies is justified or most beneficent.
    • Such methodology should be compatible with existing standardized business process modeling methods such as BPM.
  • 5. Related Research
    • Gruhn & Köhler, Mobile Process Landscaping - fairly complex methodology where mobile process identification is performed through four-step decomposition.
    • Emphasis on locational uncertainty of processes while paying less attention to user mobility. Methodology does not have elaborated notation such as BPMN.
    • Valiente & Van der Heijden - methodology based on searching for processes in which decision making flows and coordination flows are shifted by the activities of mobile and stationary users.
    • Main emphasis on observing the mobility of users performing these processes. Methodology lacks formalized approach because they are using their own (P-graph based) notation.
  • 6. Mobile Process Recognition
    • ...is proposed methodology for early mobile activities recognition and their formalized description based on widely accepted business decision-making methods and standardized BPM notations.
    • MPR goals :
      • To enable a simple recognition of mobile activities from among the total set of activities, prior to the very business process modeling.
      • To set rules for formalized description of mobile activities using familiar methods and techniques for designing IS as well as those used for business process modeling.
    • Terminological notes:
      • Business process – a set of decisions and activities performed to accomplish a goal the execution of which requires time and specific resources.
      • Activity – elementary activity within a process. Several activities make a process.
  • 7. MPR steps 1 & 2
    • Decomposition of the process down to the elementary activities level. Result is represented by decomposition diagram.
      • Advantages: simplicity, easy visualization and comprehensibility for a wide circle of business professionals that are not IT professionals.
    • Determining the actors that perform activities. The result is a list of actors and the assignment of elementary activities defined in the previous step to actors selected for performing them.
      • Advantage: comprehensibility for business professionals.
  • 8. MPR steps 3 & 4
    • Conceptual construction of the BCG matrix for distribution of activities defined in the first step, in accordance with actor mobility and dynamics of the location at which activities are performed:
      • Columns refer to actor mobility during the execution of processes or activities.
      • Rows refer to the dynamics of the location at which a particular activity or process is performed.
    • Positioning of activities as determined in the first step, in accordance with actor mobility and dynamics of the location at which activities are performed, into one of the four quadrants of the BCG matrix conceptually defined in the previous step.
  • 9. BCG Matrix Mobile Stationary Location dynamics/ Actor mobility Partially mobile activities Actor is mobile, location at which activities are performed is certain. Example: Handling of goods in a warehouse. Stationary activities Actor is stationary, location at which activities are performed is certain. Example: Machine operating jobs, software development. Location certain Fully mobile activities Actor is mobile, location at which activities are performed is uncertain. Example: Traffic control performed by traffic police. Partially mobile activities Actor is stationary, location at which activities are performed is uncertain. Example: Home nursing. Location uncertain
  • 10. MPR steps 5 & 6
    • Interpretation of activity categories:
      • Static – mobile technologies wouldn’t wield any result.
      • Partially mobile – some mobile technologies may be productive.
      • Fully mobile – mobile actors at uncertain locations, prime candidates for support by mobile IS.
    • Creating a business process model (BPM):
      • “ Leafs” of decomposition diagram – BPM activities.
      • Actors – BPM diagram lanes.
      • Activities – distributed into lanes according to their actor.
      • Grouping and labeling mobile activities according to BPMN rules – such groups represent mobile components of an IS.
  • 11. Case study – geodesic survey
    • Client: request for cadastral survey, receipt of document.
    • Field surveyor: physical points determination, entering aberrations, new physical points marking.
    • Authorized geodesist: geodetic database searching, measuring of control lines, creation of new blueprints, specification of modifications, geodetic project submission, modifications implementing, sending document to client.
    • Cadastral official: geodetic project review, registering new state.
  • 12. Geodesic survey – BCG matrix Mobile Stationary Location dynamics/ Actor mobility Partially mobile activities : • Geodetic project submission Stationary activities • Request for cadastral survey • Receipt of document • Creation of new blueprints • Specification of modifications • Modifications implementing • Sending document to client • Geodetic project review • Registering new state Location certain Fully mobile activities : • Physical points determination • Entering aberrations • New physical points marking • Measuring of control lines Partially mobile activities : • Geodetic database searching Location uncertain
  • 13. Geodesic survey – BPM diagram
  • 14. Conclusion
    • Mobile process recognition methodology presented in this paper is simple to use and is based on the confirmed existing business process modeling and IS design methods and techniques.
    • In mobile activities identification, actor mobility and the uncertainty of the location at which activities are performed are both taken into consideration.
    • MPR presents results in standard BPM notification (BPMN).
    • MPR is opened for further extensions and elaborations (for example, about types of mobile technologies best associated with each mobility type).
  • 15. any ? Thank You [email_address] ,