Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Introduction to Wildlife Photography 2014

1,469 views

Published on

An introduction to wildlife photography

Published in: Art & Photos
  • Digital Wildlife Photography --- http://amzn.to/22wwDEW
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Wildlife Photography: From Snapshots to Great Shots --- http://amzn.to/1Rv3Qsa
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Wildlife Photography: Advanced Field Techniques for Tracking Elusive Animals and Capturing Magical Moments --- http://amzn.to/1puVwlJ
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

Introduction to Wildlife Photography 2014

  1. 1. Wildlife Photography By David Elms
  2. 2. What is the best Camera? • Compact • Bridge Camera • Consumer SLR • Professional SLR • Remember the quality of the lens has a big effect on the quality of the final image
  3. 3. Fill the Frame
  4. 4. • 14 x 7 Squares = 98 • 10 MP = 10,000,000 Pixels • 10,000,000 / 100 = 100,000 Pixels • Therefore the Rabbit is 1 hundredth of the total image size • Or less then 1 Mega Pixel Fill the Frame
  5. 5. Fill the Frame • Get as close to the subject as possible using what ever method you can if you intend to crop the image or blow it up for printing or any visual application.
  6. 6. Circle of Alertness
  7. 7. Get close to your subject • Camera Options – Digital Zoom – Optical Zoom – Teleconverters – Telephoto Lenses • Human Options – Practice – Field Craft – Knowledge
  8. 8. Focal Length 18mm
  9. 9. Focal Length 35mm
  10. 10. Focal Length 50mm
  11. 11. Focal Length 100mm
  12. 12. Focal Length 200mm
  13. 13. Focal Length 300mm
  14. 14. Focal Length 400mm
  15. 15. Focal Length 600mm
  16. 16. Focal Length 800mm
  17. 17. The Basics - Part 1 • Know your Camera – work out the best settings. – Highest Resolution (Raw/Jpeg) – Mode = Aperture Priority – Metering = Evaluative/Matrix – Focus Pattern = Ai Servo or Predictive Focus – Focus Mode = Continuous Focus / Single Focus – Shooting Mode = Single or Multishot.
  18. 18. The Basics – Part 2 • Remember the old adage “F8 and you’re there”. i.e. F8, ISO 400 is a good starting point • Know your Kit
  19. 19. Remember that light is king • Time of day • Sunrise & Sunset warms. • Position of sun to subject. • Understand how to combat poor or bright light. • Use filters, polarisers as required. • Remember without light you will have no image.
  20. 20. Practice makes perfect • Get out and practice – Zoos – Safari Parks – Parks – Garden – Countryside – Nature Reserves – Holidays – Other Locations
  21. 21. • Pros – See species that you normally wouldn't encounter • Cons – Glass or wires can prove tricky to remove Zoos and Safari Parks
  22. 22. Zoos and Safari Parks • Pros – See species that you normally wouldn't encounter – Allows you to get close to the wildlife • Cons – Glass or wires can prove tricky to remove – Tags, rings or markings will give the game away
  23. 23. • Pros – See species that you normally wouldn't encounter – Allows you to get close to the wildlife – Allows you to see many different species in a limited time • Cons – Glass or wires can prove tricky to remove – Tags, rings or markings will give the game away – Backgrounds can be problematic Zoos and Safari Parks
  24. 24. • Pros – No or Low cost • Cons – Furniture and Backgrounds can be problematic Parks and Gardens
  25. 25. • Pros – No or Low cost – Can spend long hours on location with facilities close to hand. • Cons – Furniture and Backgrounds can be problematic. – May have limited wildlife available Parks and Gardens
  26. 26. • Pros – No or Low cost – Can spend long hours on location with facilities close to hand. – You can modify the environment to attract different species. • Cons – Furniture and Backgrounds can be problematic. – May have limited wildlife available. – Finding suitable quiet times Parks and Gardens
  27. 27. • Pros – Photograph wildlife in their natural habitat. • Cons – Distance to subject can cause problems Countryside and Reserves
  28. 28. • Pros – Photograph wildlife in their natural habitat. – Access to other like minded people. • Cons – Distance to subject can cause problems. – Other people may become a distraction or a hindrance. Countryside and Reserves
  29. 29. • Pros – Photograph wildlife in their natural habitat. – Access to other like minded people. – Availability of multiple habitats within a small radius of yourself. • Cons – Distance to subject can cause problems. – Other people may become a distraction or a hindrance. – You can never be sure what you will find (or not find). Countryside and Reserves
  30. 30. • Pros – Combine your photography with a relaxing break. • Cons – You may not be able to devote as much time to photography as you would like. Holidays
  31. 31. • Pros – Combine your photography with a relaxing break. – A little planning can help reduce time and costs. • Cons – You may not be able to devote as much time to photography as you would like. – Additional kit to carry. Holidays
  32. 32. • Pros – Combine your photography with a relaxing break. – A little planning can help reduce time and costs. – You never know what you will find – That’s half of the fun. • Cons – You may not be able to devote as much time to photography as you would like. – Additional kit to carry. – You may have to accept that sometimes you can’t get the perfect shot. Holidays
  33. 33. – My Fish Tank Other places of interest
  34. 34. – My Fish Tank – Conservation and Animal welfare organisations Other places of interest
  35. 35. – My Fish Tank – Conservation and Animal welfare organisations – Friends • Gardens • Pets • Work • Hobbies Other places of interest
  36. 36. Common Issues • Wrong settings – Practice, always take a test shot. • Subject too distant – Get closer! • Subject out of focus – Focus on the eyes • Camera Shake – Brace it or increase shutter speed • Motion Blur – Increase shutter speed or light.
  37. 37. Be patient! • Be prepared – have you camera ready. • Keep you eye on the ball – you never know what is going to happen next. • Keep a cool head. • Keep still and quiet. • Have patience sometimes it all falls into place beautifully.
  38. 38. • Close-ups. • Place the subject in its environment. • Look for interesting angles. • Aim to remove clutter. • Keep the eyes sharp. • Consider alternative camera settings. Consider Composition
  39. 39. Composition Rules • Remember what you have learnt before – Rule of thirds – Odd numbers work better – Get down to the subjects level • Work your subject • Take plenty of photos • Remember you can always change crops etc post capture.
  40. 40. Know Your Subject • What is its habitat? • What does it eat? • When is it active? • Does it migrate / hibernate? • When does it breed and Is it more active/visible during the time? • Does it have seasonal coats? • How close can you get to it?
  41. 41. So in short • Know your Kit. • Know your subject. • Practice. • Be patient. • Take images of the subjects normal behaviour. • Look for interesting/unusual behaviour. • Take many shots, use few. • Remember the Country code etc. • Take only pictures, leave only footprints.
  42. 42. Thanks!

×