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Scczli McCabe Sloi/ es

A LOOK BACK

MARCH 13 — APRIL 10, [996

TIME ()Nl£ CLUB Fon ART &' Copy
32 EAST 2.lS'l‘ STREIZT
Ni...
"Ilic Onc Club is proud to rccognizc the acliicvciiiciits of

Scali McCabe Slovcs,  an agcncy that set standards of C. 'CL...
It Happened So Fast

It all happened so fast. 

Yesterday we were five partners and a secretary in two hotel rooms
and toda...
Volvo

Tllc key element in Volvo advertising For twenty years was not safety,  as
many now believe.  All Volvo advertising...
FAT CARS
DIE p0!

fiumc can J‘-sum ‘

lllclfl-¢*l'r in the nw -l'I
III-(. lf| 'lngIl| £‘l1(‘l| '
an-und. 

Dual: -nu!  '| ll...
"WHAT SOME OF
MY CONIPETITORS
CALL ‘FRESH’
ISN’T FRESH TO ME! ’

/ iml:  Rm/ uc

 
    
   
    

. t. ... ,- . I.. '.| .....
Perdue

N1).  Frank l’c*1‘1l11c didn't bcconw II11: spnkcs111:111 for | ’cr1luc cl1i1‘kc11 lat-t‘.111w
hc looked or so1111...
R §00 PLAYS OUR HIGH FII| Ell'll

V 1

  

Maxell

M;1xcll ':1s :1 11cvco111cr to thc :111diot;1pc
c:1tcgt11‘1' in A111cri...
LPE STILL DELIVERS HIGH FIDELITY. 

K   1'  -1‘ [TS WOI(l‘H 1'1?

w1111 SOME
TAPE YOU

cA11’1 1:11

voun BRASS

FROM

Y0||...
Why a smaflfii 6%‘
demands mam @% am
ME Efifiam a mg cat‘. 

drain line me out ol an oil. 

A1

     
   
     

      
  

  ...
Hebrew National

Yin didn't lmve to he .1 genius to figure out Heln'e' N'. iti<m; il'. ‘ biggest
lllilrkctlllg problem.  T...
His Name Is Edward, 
But Call Him Edfor Short

Let's get the stupid heightjokes out otithe way from the beginning.  “I've ...
and little,  offto the side with one ofthe lesser partners pointing at him.  it was a huge black and
white photo with lots...
THE ROADS gr
OF AMERICA ARE
STREWN WITH4
BROKEN PROMISES. 

More than fifty tltottsand ears were abandoned last

year.  In ...
said:  "Here I am. " He yelled "Get into my ollice. 

MY CHICKENS
EAT BETTER
THAN YOU DO. 

innnediatelyl" from the other ...
I/ V/10 Cares I/ Vhere the Beef Is? 

So what ifit was one ofthe first decent Saturdays ofspiing.  And a major
portion oft...
.o‘ 
3
. “ > s
The Perdue Campaign
You Never Got to See

It was the early seventies.  I had recently been made a copy supervisor
and give...
“Piece-a shit. " he said.  “They coulda had Henery Hawk. "

The advertising ran.  Almost immediately Frank Perdue became t...
Sam

Fliliere vas.  ofconrse.  the public perception ofan agency inotivated only by the
fear olia tyrannical taskiiiastei'...
You Know I/ Vho

He proved that being decent and being successful are not mutually
exclusive. 

He ;1|': iys saw the glass...
“Don’t Kiss Me,  ” Ed Screamed

(Re/ nini. ~‘a'uccs qfsim'cn'r days)

In 1975 I came limping in to SMS fi'om an agency cal...
Co—I’II. o'r ‘ro l’n. o'r:  “Great Flight.  Chet. “
PILOT:  “I never flew better since I stopped using toilet paper. "

St...
Home Was
A Place Called
Scali McCabe Sim/ es

HUIHL‘ '.1’ .1 pl.1cc c.1|1cd Sc.1]i Mc(I;1bc S| n'c‘. 

(hc but L‘1‘c.1ti'c...
All in the Family

Tl1ert' are a lot ollpeople out there who will tell you that Scali Mc(I;1be
Sloves was like a family.  ...
To Face Fear

W/ hat vas it like to show ai1 ad to the most brilliant copywriterl creative
director in the history of adve...
AFTER THE DECLARATION
OF INDEPENDENCE
OUR FOUNDING FATHERS
WROTE SOMETHING
EVEN MORE IMPORTANT

Ten years after the signin...
Runyonesque Characters

Scali McCabe Sloves was filled vith Runyonesque characters — from :1
promising.  young copywriter ...
There Was This Great Big Gay
Named McCabe

’1—here was this great big guy 11:1n1ed McCabe. 

It was a long time ago.  But ...
l’LfteEI11):1'on
i1l»u11k'11~4_s: 

. =fi: .|,  .. 
W1

; (
,4.
. 

: ; '<«-*_pv~ -_. .

    

_. ,_! E

Hilton
“‘l1Il>{t: ...
The ’0I‘S[ time.  I '.1s in there For .111 hour .111d .1 l1.1II'.  (A record? )
Someone .1etu.1Ily I1.1d time to run out a...
Good Fortune

I I1.1d the good fortune to l1.1'e worked .11 l)DlS. _I.1ek Tinker «X I’.1rt11ers. 
We-lls Rich Greene .111d...
I/ Vorth It

I I1.1d been .1t Scali .1 gr.111d tot.1l ofthree
days.  I w.1s ner'ous as hell about presenti11g
to Ed McCabe...
I/ Vhat Sam Scali Was Like

A couple ofthings stand out in my mind when I think about Sam:  bull dog
tenacity and relentle...
_IfyQup1antodnnk 
this holiday season,  Hertz
_wou1d111<etorecommend
‘a another rent—a-car

It-tram‘:  just run . a tan
mi...
WHEN YOU BUILD
THE RIGHT KIND OF CAR
YOU DON'T HAVE TO
PAY PEOPLE TO BUY II

 
    
     

Vim

 ittam. 
SWEEPS tumttttt

...
A Barrel Full ofMo1/zleeys

I consider mysell‘ one of‘ the fortunate creative people in advertising for having
the opportu...
I/1'1/id Memories

My most vivid memories of I:  painfully glorious years at Scali Mc(Iabe Sloves go back to
my very Iirst...
April Fools’ Day,  1971

I started at Scali McCabe Sloves on April Fools‘ day in l()7I.  And For the next I3
years.  I had...
It was I987. we were at Pinnacle Peak.  a cowboy steak liouse outside
Scottsdale.  Arizona.  It was a wild place with liui...
THE ONE CLUB FOR ART & COPY
32 ISAST ZIST STREET
NEW YORK,  NY 10010
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Scali, mc cabe, sloves, inc.

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A One Club retrospective on the history of one of America's greatest ad agencies, Scali McCabe Sloves

Published in: Marketing
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Scali, mc cabe, sloves, inc.

  1. 1. ,, ,__¢gc_—_, .=‘. f$? -='= C.‘F-21§'aLnnLqi—s. a-nu-naaa_; :~: .__. ._. ':7-_-Va. ‘_ * ' tr’ . . . . s ~ t i}. e. 7 u ' * Du’ x {int 0 '0’ A "0 0 » fl 1- . _ . _ . .. .. __. _.___. _____. ... __. . . .____-. .c_. .. .._3L_+*_-
  2. 2. Scczli McCabe Sloi/ es A LOOK BACK MARCH 13 — APRIL 10, [996 TIME ()Nl£ CLUB Fon ART &' Copy 32 EAST 2.lS'l‘ STREIZT Nizw YORK, NY IOOIO
  3. 3. "Ilic Onc Club is proud to rccognizc the acliicvciiiciits of Scali McCabe Slovcs, an agcncy that set standards of C. 'CL‘llCl1CC in crcativc advcrtisiiig and built brands in a coinpctitivc industry. A crcativc : lgCl1C)’ is only tl)L‘ sum total ofits talent. tlic pcoplc who do the work. This look back by some ofthc alumni OFSMS recreates the pictlin. ‘ of an agency that served as an academy. It was a place where one learned the hard way. It was said that it‘ you had Scali McCabc Slovcs on your l'CSllIllL‘. that was enough. Agencies evolve as does the lnisiiicss. This l'CII‘0SpL‘L‘Ii"C hopes to inspirc people to kccp their creative staiidards high. MARY WAiu. i(: i< Excciitivc Din. -ctor lnti'odiio: tory text by Ed McC: ibc This catalog was made possiblc by a gem-roiis gift from Lowi. & l’AR'i‘i'i. =Rs/ SMS (Iopyriglit Ii? ) I99!) Tiii-. Om-. Snow FUR ART AND C()l’’ All rights reserved. ISBN o-o. :9.'37-09-(i Tlizinks to several individuals who liclpcd with thc cxliibitioii Ron Valcntc. arcliivist. Msircic (Iohn. Kristin ()'CNO| l judy Bloniarz. Todd (iziliiicy. Caroline Kzizlas Catalog design by S'rui>io 3|
  4. 4. It Happened So Fast It all happened so fast. Yesterday we were five partners and a secretary in two hotel rooms and today our mailroom is bigger than the original agency. Our g1'o'tl1 is what the five of us dreamed of when we were talking about putting together SMS. We‘ wanted to make a lot olimoneyz we wanted to be large and employ lots olipeoplez we wanted to leave an important imprint on the advertising, community. But what we wanted more than anything else — no matter how big we got. how many people we employed. how much money we made — was never to lose our spirit ofexcellence and our desire to produce exrraort‘linary advertising. That‘s what actually brought us together in the first place. I remember those first few days at the Gotham Hotel and the arguments about what kind oI"‘pl1ilosopl1y" SMS would have in the years to come. I remember Ed MeCabe saying_v_. “Let's not have any philosophy let's have a standard. The word ‘philosophy' sounds unchanging. written in stone. But advertising is in constant change because it represents and retlects a society in change. " So we believed one thing that would never change for us was our standard: humane. relevant, intelligent advertising. There would be no IorIi1tIl; is. no absolutes. Ultimately. only a talented art director and copy- writer would sit together. study the information provided by the marketiugg, people and client. and put together meaningful. persuasive advertising that would make the consumer buy our clients‘ products for the right reasons. We will continue like this for as long as we're connected with SMS. MARVIN S1.ovi-: s Reprinted from I5 limzs with Salli . It'(: ¢lll(' Slows lmz, Ne' York. I931.
  5. 5. Volvo Tllc key element in Volvo advertising For twenty years was not safety, as many now believe. All Volvo advertising had one single-iiiinded mission: to conquest disgrtttitled domestic car owners. The primary focus was on reliability and durability — the areas where l)etroit was perceived a. s weakest. Volvo‘s reputation For safety emerged as a result olithis advertisiiig. Because Volvo became widely recognized as a car that was tough and nearly iiidestructiblc. people began to conclude that a car as strong as a Volvo niust be a safe car too. The best advertising always lets consumers discover and invent their own reasons For buying. If we had told people Volvos were safe they would have been less likely to coiiclttde that for them. selve. s', and the advertising would have been tin‘ less povei'ti. il. The success of Volvo advertising was not in all the .1warcls it won. not in just the number olicars it helped sell. (Volvo was the largest—selling liuropean import For many years. ) The remarkable thing vas that Volvo advertising helped dealers sell cars with the highest gross profits per car in the industry at the lowest advertising cost per car in the business. nm) It _utir next car slioultl [mi ’ohii. You'd pr-ihalil_ neverd -| "‘I| l isntiii . tl Iztnot G. ()lv: n nl'estlie! tl. rllc1 all. lt_' liii_ 1| car you tiiiglit re, -ret‘. ' lote letter tutlie L| (l| P.lll) that built _uiiir . . ‘tItI. tiiin: iiciii. k. I Iigumt ll. xs. iiitvl| )ct Yet at 'oltu. m-get tlieinall tltetinte, Zlllallliitore ttitlo‘ iii ll . .)IVlbjU~l th-ii't uatle . llIll1tllIllL"lf$"JllIlL 'ith a Volvo, _oii'Il piiibalilyeml up never Mil} he bee. sc‘)1lll (ll 10 pulpit. ‘ l)1I hu_s ill l1lL'llll'rV4l your l; iiiiiI_t. “ luv" lL‘lIn1,llI(I) you're sum. vox, v'o l)l. ‘ ‘olvnsate izm y. .lar_ llmsartl lll ’tsl l‘reIitm1. ew _ . . think ml ; in_ l1|L' . » eat you raiit1'lieve In. lltit some peonh iotsn ’uluvsaren'I Jersey: “ I his is Iltelirst time in my lllt: sl4tn to rite . llIlll your merely llClp[))‘. Tl| C_ hsolutuly L'’. l£llIL' tli. it l still 1- People ltl. e()n‘ Jaeolvsoiiol 1tev.1ite. ir. la . . . ... iL. . . . 4.. .. ,. ll. 5. li ‘. ..'-. «' 1 ~I! v- »n. i.n-, am. ..4 in. M . .t. ._. i.. . on A: cfl-ht nu- let-. ~ I. L. .. ., . ,e. . ‘ . , i. ... .a We-at . ..4 . min. -L A/ : ~-l. ..4 Lu» In-.4 . ..,
  6. 6. FAT CARS DIE p0! fiumc can J‘-sum ‘ lllclfl-¢*l'r in the nw -l'I III-(. lf| 'lngIl| £‘l1(‘l| ' an-und. Dual: -nu! '| ll lull! ol ‘lInInw and lIll| .‘. ‘ ‘‘[. IIlM. ‘ til" thtcl medal. it J-we-n'i take long for . u.ir In eullapw umlt-r llie slr. |Il| i Ssin bull am mil in. .1 I. -Wu-ts. -. you must gin lu ng um: basin fact. Fat on (an. .- on people. can he latal. 't- the 4 smaller engine (ll --ffllir III in! and Illt| ‘ the lI| '‘l -rows. -I 'O| ,‘()_ '] | ||; ' I-', '| ‘.I-'1“-j L‘, |(_ the n. for htttel | |.ll"ll11,, he on . n ratillunir. Th. -i nat uc . l-4| nialw iIn- P-I! i‘l| ;:'l u| fll| ‘iIfll| I'l1ll‘l| :}: ml l'"ll uiniiili imm- lltvltl i. -,; .. .-m at. .. . . t . am In stay. » l'. lf let: 'Iu-ii ue lr*Ifll'| A‘J ilic '-ils u, .1 Int -vi superlluntis snin‘ uas ai. >| I['l. A '. tl. ml-u-sit’: hat 'lll. ‘h'l1vllV| lI| l , .. ... ..a. ... u. .- im. .. ii. ... .. i.-. i. ... ..«. .., ;.. ..i i. ~s. n.i . i.. - . .-. .. t. i.. <.i. . lrxll‘—lJnl.1 long. i. ... tnlllls. It has . . short “M U I_. .m . i.-. -.s. ... .. ll t. ..t. i. fll-In‘ | lIJtI . . t. ... ... t.. . tit. -«think s. ... ... .. t. ... t.. i.- lI| .|l t‘. .i. ... ».. ».i ht . ... .v. .i. ..t. t.- i. ... ,.. «.. i.t mix its mi. in. .. wide i. -.. ... .. . . iv. am‘. ,. -.. ..r. .m. -.- . oats I. ..“ i. ... g . t.~. ;g. ..-. .. im. ~.t ll . ..i. ..i. .t. ..i mu ls». loss. 'c lII. I|(k‘ . i ‘. »l. - mtlv Hui he .1.-Litms that '1 i-ut 0| imii . ” run "15: Illc llL’~ | ‘|'l It‘ '. »lu-sn'i: I~! -'r-sl nm. .- l| §‘. ;na. ..t. ..u Ilie ‘ i. .-. .- . .. ll| in | l' . .. ta. .. . ... - sttllmiilici llsi-u. l--xit we 't. ~u«. l.--l. .m»ini. l nIllu| l| mu. .m rl. —im. -a: .:l. l'. iliu ‘TL-'LV. | It-t like a r|4~ N1"! r Uuls n-~x . .-i. i:. . .a. .i. ... .. . - Nu-. lnesii't ii ‘la . .. r . ii. ... ii. <.. ... «.»u .1.. .-. mn. s.-. t mt. .. - , .-. nu. -.. g.. .. . ,v. .a. ..n Ilh‘l. |l . ... ma It)‘/ ‘() IT DOES 60 TO 0 IN4 SECONDS FLAT with mm: car makers i ng m hurtlc you to so rnilc; an hour in record time. it‘: nice tn know sonicanc cares about bringing you back. _ Volvo doc». So we give you something mou others don't: fnumvhecl power dII€ brain. Dine bnken Ire beucr than conventional dnirn brakes bccaule they resist fading even after repeated emerucncys-tops. . Another good thing Ihuul Volvo lzrakcsi there mgwo-eparatc fink-nu systems- Euch on: in connected to three ts-heclis—two front: and one rear. Should uni: isyxlcm ever fail you llill have R . . of your original braking powcr. You could -till get from 60to0inurIdgr_flv¢se3:ondI. Tl-Lia is excl vcfiith Volvo. Thefar nl gen you nmvhuc fan. . . ,—- lI)7()
  7. 7. "WHAT SOME OF MY CONIPETITORS CALL ‘FRESH’ ISN’T FRESH TO ME! ’ / iml: Rm/ uc . t. ... ,- . I.. '.| ... .. . .. u. ¢.. t with . ... ... ¢.u. m . .( ~|0’lx| .»w mu. 1.. ... . hoax‘ lo W u. ... . . ... .1 , ... .'n . .t. . . .,. . 1.. .,» . rm. d. ;cL¢. . a. ... .-. ..1.. r.. t. .-. :.Iy . M.. .st. d um. ". ’T. I.. ‘ tn. .. . .. ... ¢l. ... ..¢ I1. 1.4.4.. ‘ . . ... «.I. .. um. . .. ... I. v. . ~~ . x‘. .;I~. . . 1.. n. .. , 1.. .. 1.. .“ . r 1.. -}. ..r. ' . l.. ...1.. ..-. ... . -ma . ..l. ..-| n. .>. A1. I 976 v. .., l.. .. I» . ... - it. v». | n “-1 | |( . ... ..~ . . . ..5 . ... ... -. . tI. »<. >.-. in. .1.. v|«Iut. ‘,. -n r r . ... ... .m. .. u. .. -1.. .’. .. . ... r . ..: .- . ... ... ».. e . v.. 1.. ..-. .| I. ... s.. —.'n, .,. .-. .1.2.—. ... .. ». . . nay. .. . .. . v.'. . u. .1.. ,;. . , ... I.. ‘ = ... .. ..l . ... .. ... ... a.. . ‘<'~n~< alt-.5 the I-vw. ..l ulsn Ln. » wt. »-. I.. v.g -. . m H. .. . v.. kl'V| i'u’lH‘$. - . ..». . . -. mu. -. .; I-rm . ... ... . . . (C. ..-. m.. . ..l .1-J. [u we-~ L4 . . . :-. .L. ... -.— w . . t-um. ..) . u’; .'x i. .. J-tr Ir A'l4I| - . .. WI 74.’-711.1 . .. ... ,.-, . . . .. . . . . ... .. . .:: ... ,- . ». kt-an wvuu I972
  8. 8. Perdue N1). Frank l’c*1‘1l11c didn't bcconw II11: spnkcs111:111 for | ’cr1luc cl1i1‘kc11 lat-t‘.111w hc looked or so1111dcd like :1 cl1ickcn. Hc bcc:1111c lllt‘ sp0kc. '111:1n l)CC;1ll‘C I11‘ ‘;1s :1 E1n:1ric :1lmu1: p1‘u1l11cing :1 . ‘llpCl'l0l’ quality product. Using Fr:111k ':1s also :1 way to <1-p:1r.11c Pcrdttc 110111 thc colnpctition. S0111ccl:1y c01npctito1'. ' 111igl1t l1;1'c | ’crd11c‘s yc]|0'—; _;1)|1lc11 color. but thcy could nc'c1' l1:1'c l’c1'duc. Ot‘c0111‘sc. it didn't hurt that thc 111:1n lookcd and s’o11ndcd likc :1 cllickcn. l’c1'duc :1dvc1‘tisi11g br:1ndcd 'l1;1t ':1s :11 thc 111111‘ pcrccivcd to be :11) 1111br:111d:1hlc cm11111u1liry. I’cr1'luc l>cc:1n1c F:1r:1nd :1':1y the 1111111111-1‘ one scllcr in its trading area. It musold all otlu-rs‘ and 1‘o111111:111dcd .1 . s'11pcr—pr1-111111111 pricc :1<. wcll. And the :1d'crtisi11g p:1vcd thc way for n1:1ny '11cccss111l ncw pmdtlct i11tr0d11ctim1.s'. W111) quite :1 ll‘' :1':11'ds ton. _l WHY DID THE CUSTOMER cuss THE ROAD? A . ' l‘111pl1*21s1-(llnn-purl llml l11-111.11-'11-1101s:111111t*(l'1ll1 pm-op]: -:1rvll1x'l; i11glu111yt'l1i. 'l11.-115. >1111ilnr r1:q111-sls l~1'111n1l. (‘mu(llor111c-. B111 11 may Rr-1'1~11ll_'. .1 . 1-w 'orl<1'l1:11n | ..- l)£l(l lot _'o1I. Int-(l:1lilllc1-xp1-111111-nl. l l1v_‘ l§rc:111.<1-1lym1:11'<~11'l st-lli111,; pul 111_'cl1i1:l;1~11sn11 . ~':1lv(? |:1l 391‘ T l ‘ __! .‘k_ I11)‘lasly.1cn1l1-r. yn1111gPrrtluv :1pou11<l. l11slc:11lulll11-irnunnatl 0 m-‘ ma} 1‘; 3"‘ cl1itl((*11.<. nlallyolynur611510111615 . ~e1l. -pric1~nlZ‘)1'. -. .. - . .- . . " ' H " 1:1-ultl l1cgo111go'r~rloIl11-o1l1r-r o11l<nrm l1iIllI. ’Ip[14'I1(‘1l. ) std. -.1111] l)11y111glm111yn11r l l1<-_' soltl just as 111.111.':1.<m'1-1. 1'1>111pt: l1_l1n11. . —ll ml 11 l11cl1 pmw-. < :1 ll11s1s11l usl I(ll1'(lll(‘lilll m11>l1~nlll1i11 5. _ V l g l , g _ _ 1-1ll1er. l 11- ml umnl. l’1-11 pl. -mllu. .1>11lolIl1«-11 5 1 _ 1 = _ B1’-l'1*1-11()clt>l11-1l‘)Il1 antl 1': .1_'I11l)11y at Sll]K‘IlI'll’ proclutl. No'c111lu>r l7Il1al011«: ,lU.00(l . -111lyn11cn11'l1nrg1- ll1<‘111 . l-1-11-urk1'1s 1'all1'rl11p r1~q11<-sl 1111; :1 loll for ll1<-I111 1. . ll11:11a111~: s-wlllw . ~lo1'cs111-:1rll11:111 4/ . . , . ‘l11t‘l1s0l<l l 1-r¢l11r, -<'|11cl'1-11. ’ . l. '1|ur. ‘1lly, l Inltl llIl‘l11. . ~’1l:1.'«ln. '-. ~'11't go lxy Cull 'I'nm Rul~in: ..n, our Sales Mann 1-r. Yo-Inn nmlyu but-«you: /inl : h1'pmrr1luIPrnlurt- n has hwuarnm. W73
  9. 9. R §00 PLAYS OUR HIGH FII| Ell'll V 1 Maxell M;1xcll ':1s :1 11cvco111cr to thc :111diot;1pc c:1tcgt11‘1' in A111cric:1 :111d was :1 l1r:111d ll-11' pcoplc had ever l1c:1rd of. T111‘ str:1t1-gy ':1s :1 simple 0111:. D011‘: scll :1 better tnpc, sell bcttcr so1111d. So. Mnxcll :1dvcrrisi11g_r, nddrcsscd the q11:1lity ofthc sound — ofthc cxpc1'ic11cc — ol‘listc11i11g to 11111sic on M:1xcll tape. The :1d'crrisi11g bcc:11111' 1cgc11d:1ry. And Muxcll 111o1'cd fi'on1 1111111bcr fivc to nu111l11:r one in thc pt-c111iun1 :1udi0t:1pL‘ 111:1rkct.
  10. 10. LPE STILL DELIVERS HIGH FIDELITY. K 1' -1‘ [TS WOI(l‘H 1'1? w1111 SOME TAPE YOU cA11’1 1:11 voun BRASS FROM Y0|| R0B0E- ’ . maxell ; b v0 -13 l1). 'l ‘ Ilnl. 'IHl1. J
  11. 11. Why a smaflfii 6%‘ demands mam @% am ME Efifiam a mg cat‘. drain line me out ol an oil. A1 : . ' Al My speed. lhe oil In a mull car is wovking twice all U. §.and lovelgn car as hard as In 1 blg cat. ll| flI)Yil: lIIrcfi' speclflcallons. .. . «Sip K. me big rerr . « W ' ‘V , . 1.‘ . i.» . ," , ‘> L". 01 III: best selling oils, only Castro! has passed hath U5. and "'9 W“ °'' '"! "'‘°'‘‘' Oorelgn ur eng| ne lestlng. '°' ‘"“""°‘"‘ e , l¢)7.‘. Castro] (: ;l'[l‘0l . Id'erti<in1_v, is u el; is. x‘i«. ‘ example ofturgeting .1 small ninrket that} in the pruee. '. ' oflieeoiiiiiig -’ ‘: e!£'. :.s. ;.~: ':'x: J bi$r(l)1ll: ilgl1 the ; i§_', eIiey‘s long in'olvement with ' I D U C | N E A N U I '- Vulvo. we knew the ear nmrket was elniiigiiig. The S 0 RE M A R B [E '1. EVEN that had been populni mi P U R E N E I N E (fnstrol. being ti‘0ni England and used by sports car A R U D l N I L ; lir1<‘i()lllld()S for niany ye; ir', could logically position itselli.1.x' "Tlie oil engineered for 'lIl: l”L‘l‘ C: ll‘. ‘. “ The)‘ had the hi. 't0r)‘. All they needed v; is [hL' Product. The 5 . i i ‘I i it . ugeney convinced the client to zietually engineer an oil ’ for ’lll. l”Cl'. higher re''ing engines. The client listened. And (fiixtrol nioved ti‘oni fifth place into .1 tie For fimt in the niotor oil category.
  12. 12. Hebrew National Yin didn't lmve to he .1 genius to figure out Heln'e' N'. iti<m; il'. ‘ biggest lllilrkctlllg problem. They had the word “Helurev" in their HAIIHL‘. and their protluets were “l(o‘|1er. " The solution to the prohlein was to redefine the word “Koslier. " ll)‘[C: ltl Ol’-'()l1lC[llll‘lg th. it nie; int "etlinie" or “l'L‘llgl()ll. '. “ Hebrew llLl[l0ll: |l ;1tl'erti<ingiii;1de “Kosl1er" , syi1t)1iyiii0tis with "higher quality. " The ; lLlVL‘l‘[l. ‘ll]g — perli; ips best exemplified by the nu'-tiiinnus “Uncle Sinn" eminnereial — helped lll; ll'L' Hebi'e' Nntimml the number one premium li‘; iiiltfi1rter in / nierie;1. lt‘< also notable that “Uncle Sun! “ l'. ‘1ll for more than 20 yezirs. innking it perlmps the longest running Food t'oniinerei;1| ofnll time. 197.! IN ADOG EAT DOG'l'OWN, WE’RE NUMBER ONE. Accolding lo the latest Nlelsen, Hsbrow National Hot Dogs are the Num one lranklunc-r In dollar sales | n NewYork—lhe city where mote hot dogs are ealen than anyplace else In the warld. We deliver more ptolll per pound and per package than any other leading hot dog. 50 ll you want u brg bite of the kind ol dollats Hebrew Nalianal dishes oul, pm in extra loclngs right now. And let the top dog Increase your proln when hot weather hot dog eating rolls around. | t)7(>
  13. 13. His Name Is Edward, But Call Him Edfor Short Let's get the stupid heightjokes out otithe way from the beginning. “I've had it up to here with Ed Mc(Iabe. " a one—time employee otiScali McCabe Sloves says. as he gestures, his palm to his pecs. “His name is Edward. but call him Ed. For sliort, " another clever Friend offers. And there are even sillier lines, poking at a man who more than anyone has prodded people to be larger than they'd be without his influence. To me. no one in advertising was bigger than Ed McCabe. He's the giant. with thousands ofad writers inspired by him. And probablyjust as many tired by him. I'm one ofthe writers who resides in both categories and proud ofiit. (I want to get this all down before I Forget. That‘s the real reason For this. Although another large advertising legend. hired by Ed I might add. says “don't look back" and I agree, except this look back is important before everyone forgets. And lest anyone Forget: there’s nobody who’s done what he's done. ) lfthere is one campaign that is why I'm in advertising, it's his work for Horn & l-lardart with the theme: “You can’t eat atmospliere. " I remember the various executions as though I saw them on the subway this morning: “We give you fresli vegetables instead ofcanned music. " Then there's the copy he wrote for another ad: “Where do you think they get the money for all that Fancy decor, out olithe air? No. They get it out ofthe beef. " Ever the wise-guy. Ed. honing his | ’erdue tough talk. Other kids were hanging Beatles andjimi Hendrix posters on their bedroom walls. I actually had that first poster. ripped off from the F train, the one that said. big as life: “You can't eat atmospliere, " with .1 plate filled with green tassels as broccoli. orange candlestieks as carrots and a swatch of rich brown carpet as steak. Ron Barrett art directed the piece. Their names appeared under the photo in the awards book like gods to me. Horn & Hardart is a perfect prototype For Edcampaigns to come. It was at Carl Ally where Ed got the chance to do what he would continue to do with such showy brilliance. Ed gave the whole world of advertising a nastier, more competitive spin — his early wise-ass attitude combined with indisputable strategic reasoning. When Mc(Iabe did it. he did it with more style than anyone before or since. At :1 recent Ally é'' (iargano retrospective at The One Club. Ed spoke about the two years he had been there. Two years. I thought. That's all? And all that '0l)(‘lCl‘ll. ll work? I barely recall what I had for dinner last night but I recall the day decades ago when I first saw a (Tinzano poster on a bus: “(Iinzano ashtrays are only ashtrays. But Cinzano candlesticks are also vermouth. " Part otihisz “America, you know us For the wrong thing" campaign with the always-class—act Ralph Aminirati. and “lfmore people stopped smoking and started drinking we could get out ofaslitrays and get into vermouth. " The long headline. With Ed. always worth wading across‘. Vespa and Salada Tea were done by him during that time. too — less memorable for me. but the beginning ofa key pairing with Bob Wilvers. Which brings us to Volvo. They are run- ning ads and commercials today For Volvo that were carved out by Ed in the sixties (talk about retro). He started working on Volvo with Wilvers at Ally. but two short years later he really made Volvo famous at what was to become the miraculous Scali Mc(Iabe Sloves. I remember the photo of the live principals that sat in the reception area at 34.5 Park Featun'ng Ed. life-sized
  14. 14. and little, offto the side with one ofthe lesser partners pointing at him. it was a huge black and white photo with lots ofwhite space. framed in black. Signed Avedon. ‘G7. The way I heard it told at the time. Sam Seali and Marvin Sloves and the other guys in the picture wooed Ed. They say they didift know they were going to get the Volvo account at the time they opened their doors — theyjust spent six anxious months waiting. with no business. then all otia sudden they had Volvo. It doesn‘t really matter how it happened. what always mattered was the work. the early work. the later work. all the work on Volvo pretty much shone. but none so brightly as when Ed wrote the ads: “Fat Cars Die Young, " “It Goes from ()0 to 0 in Seconds Flat. “ “Things Are Tough All Over" (pothole. Sheboygan. X/ isconsin). and on and on. X/ hen Bob Wil'eis art directed them and Ed Mc(? abe wrote them. it 'a like beat poetry. New and harsh and like nothing we'd seen. I pored over those ads when they ran in the books otithe day: L_i/1', Look’. 'l'inIc. I studied the body copy the way aspiring actors study Brando. It follows then that Ed doing Perdue is comparable to Brando doing "Streetcar. " Before Ed. a chicken ‘as_just a chicken. but inside ot‘ a Few years working on that particular piece of poultry history, (»5,000.000 pL')plL‘ were taking home a branded chicken. a l’erdue chicken. My Eworite poster in the series: “My chickens eat better than you do. " X/ ith the tagline l’erdue has used for a quarter ofia century: “It takes a tough man to make a tender chicken. “ lid. like a diminutive Don Rickles, insulted us into buying those well-fed. well-bred birds. "X/ ho cares where the beefis? " another line, one olilmmlreds. with Frank Perdue nibbling on a drumstick — a full page New York Times ad during the X/ endy‘s “Where's the Beef“ craziness. And the l’erdue TV. Ed always struck me as best at print. His television was really his print ads talking. Witli killer last lilies and cleverly crafted openings. Frank Perdue. with his awkward timing and
  15. 15. THE ROADS gr OF AMERICA ARE STREWN WITH4 BROKEN PROMISES. More than fifty tltottsand ears were abandoned last year. In Ne York City alone. T s i Il. l a local phenom non, either. People e'ery'ht' Ire lltrtuv ; , up their hands and ‘ walkittgg away from can; littering the roads with I monunn-nts to frustration. Volvo offers a simple . (vltIIioIt to the problem: Volvo. Even If you eoulcl lrlL' one into the ground, ‘~il would he too ': ll| I.'Il1l(' to leave lvint: there. (Check "cos ofold 'ulvn. ~ in your newspaper. ) "-" _nd : Volvo won't give you reason to nutkt: the ‘ tltlcntpt. Road 8; Track . Iagu: ine projects "ll0.000‘ miles between overltaulzal’ - ”-’ ' : Volvo. inshort; ishujlt to last. -1 long time. _ We dun‘: zuamptee cxnctlvhosy-Iottg, . know that ')out oft. -very I0 Vblvoo T»; t - y " ‘ ‘ "" .1 --u ~ in ~ ccll -inlh last ' an o : rut: tar ten e Lkg kl _ «. en vents are still on the road. scratchy delivery became the mouthpiece For Ed at his most logical. "It. you want to eat as good as my chickens. eat my chickens. “ Ed. you slay me. I was hired by Ed in I971 to work on Barney‘s_ (I remember an isolated phrase he wrote for an alterations ad at the time “slave over a sleeve". . . ) Actually. my early responsibilities on B; Ir1tc'y”s were to write the copy for about a dozen ads he had already written and sold. and would be running through the Iitll. He wrote the headlines. hired tne. then on the day I started. left on a five-week honeymoon. I was to write the copy in his absence. I was tortured the entire time. When he came back. with a tan and a temper. he iiiIbi'tiietI me he didn't think much ofwhat I had written. but now HE WAS BACK. His lirst week back. I was writing copy for an ad with his headline: “Is this trip necessary? " (This was when Chelsea was an out—oF—t| ie—way neighborhood and Barney's was the only thing there. ) His campaign signed off: “You go out Ofyour way to get here. X/ elve got to pay you back. “ And all the ads paid that premise Oil: "Is this trip necessary? “ was the platform piece. talking about all the virtues of‘ going out of your way to I3arney’s. (Irazy Eddie sent me back time after time with the copy For that ad. We were getting there. but it needed a transition. Something smart in between the opening ol-the copy. and the body olithe piece. Back I went. ten times to my IBM Selectric for that transition until finally. a line sweated out ofmez “X/ hat drives men to a clothing store they can't walk to? " He liked it. He loved it. (Food thing about Ed. On those rare occasions when he actually did think someone on his stallicame up with something good. he would rave about it. Sometimes. held even run up and dovn the halls and rave. He decided my line should be the new headline of the ad. So mttch For my best story about showing Ed work. SO much For the exception. On to the rule. The abuse. Witli 20 years and more OI. hindsight. it was worth it. and no. I was not into S£''M at SMS. I remember one particular episode clearly. It was my 25th birthday. A Friday. The I3th. I was working on a piece olicopy For an ad olihis I adored. an ad for Barney's Madison Room. The headline: "The conservative clothes are in the tight wing. " At around 3:00 I hear him scream: “V/ here is that meathead. Abady? " I thought. I didn't do any- thing objectionable that day. as I walked bravely as I could under his inlluence into the hall and
  16. 16. said: "Here I am. " He yelled "Get into my ollice. MY CHICKENS EAT BETTER THAN YOU DO. innnediatelyl" from the other end ofthe hall. heads now popping out ofollices between us. I walked down the hall and into his otiicc. And there he was holding a cake aloi-t, lit with candles. “Happy birthday. " he said. The creative stalTtrickIed shyly in. WC were all. to varying degrees. Irightenecl ol‘ Ed. It was no real party to speak of, but the effort. even with my discomfort. impressed me. “Did you finish the body copy for the Madison Room ad. yet? " he asked. slicing the cake. "Yeah. " I said. nervously. “I’ll bring it right in. " Minutes later. both of us eating cake. Ed slashed lines through the copy. left-lianded with his pen. like a serial killer brandishing a knife. “All wrong. all 'rong. " he says as he slashes. “This is not English. Looks like you're gonna halta work this weekend. buddy. “ he says. his mouth full oli cake. "Sure. " I say. my mouth full of ' pmnuso . (.1 cake. Happy birthday. meathead. ‘ ‘ ' A . .; }‘, g;I, §g£, §,A . _ . A'n; r<nr. nt: uic: u:n We had lunch. Ed and I. recently. So maybe he s 197: not the high—proIile talent he was then. but he does seem to me. always. like Frank Sinatra. on the verge of a spectacular comeback. Age has mellowed him (a little) and. let's face it. the state olithe industry has dilmued his work but not his energy and not his enthusiasm For the industry. Boyishly, he talks about the one or two campaigns he respects today. Anyway. maybe it isn't his time now like it was then. OI’ course its not 1973. the year he was heralded in the ad column in The . 'cu' York 'I'iIIu'. ~‘ with the headline: "Ed Mc(Iabe wins 4 Golds. I)oyle Dane liernbach comes in second with 3.“ VI/ hole agencies coulcIn‘t compete with the one man. He recounted during this lunch that one of his best days in advertising (besides the morning of that 'I'imc. s headline) was yesterday when a Ii'. igram. ‘e client sent him an e—mail that read: “Let's have diimer. Ed. I'm anxious to discuss with you how to move our goddamnetl bllsincss further. We‘re only I94 percent ahead oflast yearis figures! " On my better days in advertising. I believe he handed me a small piece olihis large gift. I think back occasionally. as I write adverti. siiig. how one night I was working late for him and snooping around his of-lice. Alongside his typewriter was .1 lat stack of white paper. each page with only one line on it. An opening line for a Volvo ad. There could ha'e been a hundred of them. one line on each sheet. So it wasn't that easy. after all. for him to be so great. I didn't realize he labored so carefully. I always thought the lines poured out otihim like water from the tap, Like the day he walked into my ollice when an art director and I were struggling o'er a Barney's ad for men's hats. “0h. ju. st do ‘Easter bonnets For men . he said. impatient with our struggle. and walked out. (Iarl Ally and its permutative name is, sadly. out olibusiness. (lone as an agency. Like Scali Mc(Iabe Slovcs — reduced to three brusque initials at the end olian Inteipublic giant. For me. Ed remains. And the influence endures. H Y ABADY
  17. 17. I/ V/10 Cares I/ Vhere the Beef Is? So what ifit was one ofthe first decent Saturdays ofspiing. And a major portion ofthe city’s population was either in the park. on the street. or out of tovn. We were fortunate enough to be working on a Perdue Oven Stuffer Roaster Parts campaign. For about the third weekend in a row. At the office. Right across the hall from the agency bullpen which was fully staffed and in full swing. And evidently. every single member of the swing shift was under the impression that if they asked often enough. sooner or later some- one would finally break down and show them where they were hiding the beefi It took Clara I’eller. Walter Mondale. and Iinally the studio crew. but we were the ones who ultimately broke dovn. I went into a “Where's the beef? " chant. Amy came back with a "Who cares? " The planets aligned. And down on paper went the idea. On Monday morning. we went into Ed McCabe's office with our weekly collection of Roaster Parts comps. And when he sav Frank's retort. he told us it had nothing to do with the assiginnent. But who cares about that either. Let's do it. AMY S(. 'II(, )’l"l‘IENl‘I£I. S BRUCI-L l{1(: H‘rI: n Reprinted from “The (}old Award Winners On The Gold Award Winners. " The Om‘ Slmw. lirlumc 7. 1986.
  18. 18. .o‘ 3 . “ > s
  19. 19. The Perdue Campaign You Never Got to See It was the early seventies. I had recently been made a copy supervisor and given a group ofone. But he resigned, which left me in charge of supervising myself. and Ed gave me more help than I asked for with that. The client list then consisted ofVolvo and a lot ofsniall accounts going nowhere. I was tnisted with the ones going nowhere. But the problem wasn't those accounts; it was Volvo. The agency would do terrific Volvo ads, and people woi. ild say. “Yeah, they can do ears, but so what? Cars are easy. " The agency needed name accounts to support the modest claim that it was an agency and notjust VoIvo’s advertising department. That's when I began hearing talk in the hallways about the Chicken Guy. It seemed we were pitching some chicken company. The agency would visit the Chicken Guy at his farm and return with stories about how he'd devoted his life to coop architecture and inarigold—petal feed. “This is ajoke, right? " people would ask. But it wasn't and before long it was an account. An art director down the hall came into my office. “I got the canipaign, " he said. “We use Heiiery Hawk. " “Who? " I asked. “You know. from the cartoons. The little guy who's always trying to eateh wliatsisnaine. Foghorn Leghorn — the chicken wlio’s about eight times his size. " “Oh. " “Foghorn Leghoni is the l’erdue chicken. Henery Hawk is always trying to eat him because he's big and delicious. " I let it go at that. Whatever the campaign was going to be. Ed and Sam were going to do it anyway. Which they did. When the advertising was unveiled. it looked like home movies. The production values weren't much. and the performances could eharitably be called amateurish. Privately (very privately) people in the agency said it was okay, but. you know. it was just a guy talking about chickens. The art director down the hall went a little further.
  20. 20. “Piece-a shit. " he said. “They coulda had Henery Hawk. " The advertising ran. Almost immediately Frank Perdue became the first Chicken Guy to go crossover. He showed up in news stories and gossip columns. He appeared in The New Yorlet-r's animal Christmas poem to celebrities. He gave chicken a first name. And gradually people realized that the advertising wasn't just about a spokesman who looked like a chicken. It was about taking a commodity and putting a brand on it, some- thing no one had done since Chiquita and her bananas. and no one else has done as well since. So the agency that could only do cars showed it could do chickens and. over the next couple of decades. practically anything else it set out to do. And along the way it showed an industry what advertising at its best could be. OF course. not everyone was paying attention. I suspect there’s an art director somewhere with a stack of Henery Hawk storyboards he’ll be happy to dust off if Perdue ever comes to its senses. My guess is he’s still available for freelance. Tom THOMAS ”(
  21. 21. Sam Fliliere vas. ofconrse. the public perception ofan agency inotivated only by the fear olia tyrannical taskiiiastei'. llut less visible was the steady. calming influence of Sam Scali. One Ol‘S: ll11‘. ‘ greatest strengths was his ability to accoiiiinodate a wide range otipersoiialities in his creative departnieiit. And. while he understood the benefits oil a good swift kick in the posterior. he also knew that some ofus were harder on ourselves than anyone else could possibly be. And. at times. more productive when left to our ovii devices. For a man who had his name on the door. he had an uncanny appreciation for the niiscliievous. He loved pranks. He loved pulling one over on the account group. Or simply having a little fun. And that in itselfhelped create lighter iiioinents. Moments in which a writer and an art director could sit back and dreain. X/ hile resting on those weary postcriors. PAUL BLADE
  22. 22. You Know I/ Vho He proved that being decent and being successful are not mutually exclusive. He ;1|': iys saw the glass as l1;I| F—fu| l. even when it was empty. X/ hen others took limos. he rode the subxvuy. He never fired .1n_‘one. (He made Earl do it. ) He was :1 proud "fiitlier" to his three biological kids and his 450 adoptive ones. He looked swell in :1 Speedo. He motivated us not with fear, but with kindness and respect. When you missed lunch, he shared his stash ofpeanuts. He hired great people, and then let them be great. He will, no doubt. be embarrassed by this tribute so I won't mention his name. But he is 'h:1t I miss most about you—know—vho. Mc(Ial>e Sloves. DEBBIE KASHER
  23. 23. “Don’t Kiss Me, ” Ed Screamed (Re/ nini. ~‘a'uccs qfsim'cn'r days) In 1975 I came limping in to SMS fi'om an agency called Nonnan Craig «'. '' Kununel. I used to call it Norman Craig and Kickback. But that’s another story. Anyhow some ofimy old pals might argue that my limp entrance was more like an armed lsraeli guerrilla visiting the Vatican. However, I felt like I had found The Promised Land. The fact is. I had worked at so many drecky places. Scali McCabe Sloves was like coming home after years ofiorphan asylums. I viewed the untamed terror. Ed McCabe. as a kind of brotherly Messiah. And I loved him fiom the first day I met him. Ed hired me to head up a group of‘wn'ters and art directors which eventually grew into a large gang that called me various maternal names. You see. even then. I was older than everybody —— including Marvin. There were kids in our gang who got pretty Famous in one way or another: l)ean Stefanides. Tony l)e(}regorio. )ax Lowell (whojust sold her first novel to Goldie l-lawn's production company in Hollywood). and the prolific Melissa Hufiinan who ran away with a tootliless cowboy and now has 5 kids including twins. Born at 48 yet. These were funny. wonderful. hard work days. Ed was his reputation. And more. Sam Scali never ate and weighed about 4 pounds. Marvin was every- body's shrink. Alan Pesky was our Smith-Barney and Len l-luldgren walked around looking like a young_| immy Stewart. There were three A(Il)’s then. _|ohn Danza. Mike Drazen and me. l)anza and Drazen did the best work. My group gave the best parties. For example. the raunchy Bon Voyage party when l was off to Club Med between my sec- ond marriage and my thircl engagement. What elegant gifis. A huge chocolate phallus. a tiny topless bikini. a thoughtful book called “The Sex of‘_]oy" fiom Joan MacArthur plus various other sentimental things. I don't recall what Carl Stewart gave me but it had to be bad. Ed's reaction to these parties was mixed. He never liked much frivolity in the office and yet I think he was mildly amused. On the other hand. he toler- ated me in a difierent way than the rest ofithe stafi‘. Whenever I would see Ed in the hall. l‘d grab him and buss him on the ear while he screamed. “l)on't kiss me! " It was a sort oFAunt Yetta from the Bronx kiss and he could never escape it. Maybe that's why he didn't clamp dovn on the parties. Mama joys group was a sort of‘Kibbutz. There are so many stories. A Freslfn Moist Toilet Paper episode comes to mind. Ed had done the original spots and they were hard to top:
  24. 24. Co—I’II. o'r ‘ro l’n. o'r: “Great Flight. Chet. “ PILOT: “I never flew better since I stopped using toilet paper. " Stan Scofield and I teamed up to do stage two and one of his Funniest ideas was toilet paper with maps of the stars‘ homes. Too bad he never made it after Scali. Anyhow. Ed approved a whole bunch ofhoards for presentation to the client. An awesome meeting of'every heavy hitter at American Can. just as we finished our presentation I pulled out a piece of yellow paper and announced that I had one more spot. Ed was not pleased. He hadn't seen it. I explained that it was a Mel Brooks/ Carl Reiner conunercial with Mel as the infamous zooo-year-old man. Carl asks Mel why he preferred Fresh’n Moist Toilet Paper over regular toilet paper. And Mel replies. "Because wet is better. You don't clean your cave with a dry raccoon. " Only now as I write this do I see the unintentional double entendre. Perhaps that‘s why the conference room was so quiet you could have dropped a pin. The good news is. Ed laughed. Not loud. But at least I didn't get canned (no pun intended). A final memory or two. There was the day the partners sold to Ogilvy and became millionaires overnight. I had a Few stock options so I made a dollar myself. The windfall didn't change anything right away. Ed was still merciless. Sam still didn't eat. Marvin bought new suits. I think. Len put all his dough into wine. And Alan Pesky put all his into Idaho or someplace. I think that was around that time that Ed. very buoyant one morning. decided to prove to everybody that he could do a hundred push-ups. So there we all were. stationed around him. as he started his routine. For some reason he slipped and split his chin on the floor. There was blood From one end of the hall to the other. Everybody was rushing around with wet cloths. ice. ban- dages. Marvin came flying down the stairs. Ed wasn’t pleased at his mishap but he made the best of it. And sure enough. he lived. Well so much for magic. I miss it a lot. But. you know what? Every time I see Ed I still grab him and kiss him on the ear. I think he's mellowed. though. because now he kisses me right back. jov GOLDEN
  25. 25. Home Was A Place Called Scali McCabe Sim/ es HUIHL‘ '.1’ .1 pl.1cc c.1|1cd Sc.1]i Mc(I;1bc S| n'c‘. (hc but L‘1‘c.1ti'cx‘ c.1111c to it i11 d1'o'cx’. It t; Illg_ht 111c;1d'L'1‘tii11;_: . it t;1ugl11 111c life. I lc;11'11cd 111)‘ '1'irc1‘ ';1x‘ rcully .1 sccu11d 'itl‘. My 1102:. my 1111-11101". '|1.1r .1 great 111.111. hc ';1s like .1 dad 10 1111‘. hi'11.1111c is S;1111. Ed l/ lC(: .Il3L‘ yelled and Ed lVlCC. l1‘nc 'L’I'L‘. ln1L‘Ll. thc Fcznr 111.1dc you g1'c.1t. that ‘;1.' his . 'cl1c111c. To 111;‘ it ‘.1x' the ; .:1'c;1tcxt ‘.1gc11cy 011 c.11‘Ih. _i11~1 look .11 the talent it did givv: birth. li*c11 (hn1|g|1 l‘'c done it t'i<c l1u'f01'c. Sc.1li'~ the PLIC1.‘ I c.111‘1 1.111 hack (0 .111y111n1'c. D1-:1N S‘1'1~:1=1N11>1as Onéoftheféw things_ on the Space Shuttle that d1dn’t have 21 backup system. ‘'1 -h. -vvm11 . . cl1 k‘ I11‘ 11rk| K 1411‘. * 11u111'L ll). ‘|
  26. 26. All in the Family Tl1ert' are a lot ollpeople out there who will tell you that Scali Mc(I;1be Sloves was like a family. The Manson Family. I11 some regards. I can understand why. Fraiikly. my tirst few weeks o11 the job scared the living shit out ofme. Partly because I was surrounded by some ofthe most famous nanies iii the husiiiess. all vying tor the best assign- ments. But mostly because ofthe two most lamous nanies in the agency: Ed Mc(Iabe a11d Sam Scali. X/ ords alone cannot convey the sheer terror of staiiding outside Ed‘. s otliee w-.1iti11g to show him a radio script or a piece of hody copy (at least you had an art director with you xvhen you showed him ads). The simple fact is. Ed Mc(Iabe motivated through i11ti111idatio11. And whether you approved or disapproved oi‘ l1is methods. you couldn't argue with the results. X/ hich more often than 11ot bordered on greatness. Sam had his own ways ofmotivating people (so111e found l1i111 more intiniidating than Ed). But tor 1111:. the greatest fear was the thought ofIet— tiug him down. Sam was somewhat ofa fatlier figure to me. and 'hen he didn't approve ofsoiiietliing. it was like a dagger through 111y heart. Both men had a profound inlluence on 111y career and o11 my life. And its safe to say that a great portion otlmy success is due to them. To 111e Scali Mc(Ia| Je Sloves was definitely a family. A bit dysliliictional at times. but a family noiietlieless. LARRY HAMPEI. I/ Vhat It Was Lilee to Worle at Scali I 'as11't there iii the glory years, l1o'e'er I did make :1 trip to the basement ot‘. '0o 3rd Avenue where I found stacks oligreat ads. I took copies otlall the tanious ones and tried to live up to them. almost successfiilly a couple of times. Then we merged. l)oN M11_1.1=.11
  27. 27. To Face Fear W/ hat vas it like to show ai1 ad to the most brilliant copywriterl creative director in the history of advertising? Fearful. But the Scali McC:1be Sloves I knew was a place full of writers and art directors who liked to face fear. Possibly thrive on it. It doesn‘t surprise 111e that many alumni from Scali went on to become very successful. After having to show an ad to Ed Mc(Iabe on a daily basis, everything else in their lives. I suspect. became a cakewalk. Although it may surprise some people, I don’t think anyone i11 advertising ever cared more about a client than Ed. The ad that Ed approved had to not only be great from a creative level, it had to sell the shit out of the product. It was what Scali MeCabe Sloves was all about. Many of us. I'm sure. would have made pretty good door—to-door bible salesmen in another era. The work. of course. was everything. Ed cared as much about a quarter-page coupon ad as he did about a 3o—second TV spot. There were no throwaway assignments at Scali McCabe Sloves. Clients not only got 111ore creative bang for their bucks, they got a nuclear blast. In looking back at Scali. some may view its acliievements in the context of a time capsule. Soniehow thinking Ed's philosophy only applied to the period oftime that the agency thrived in. That would be like saying e. 'cellence was no longer wanted i11 this world. EARL CARTER
  28. 28. AFTER THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE OUR FOUNDING FATHERS WROTE SOMETHING EVEN MORE IMPORTANT Ten years after the signing of the Declaration of lndependencc our lbuncling Etthers created what historians have called the greatest single For the first time in histoiy. power was granted by the people to the govemment. and not by the govemment to the people. The li'ee: lom unleashed by the Constitution allowed / me1'icans to develop their talents and abilities to the fullest. And attain what is now knoxm the world over as the / lmc-n'e.1n Dream. / s we commemorate the Bicentennial ofthe Constitution. there is no better way for you as an / merican to reafTu'm the principles For which our countiy st. 'mCls than to leam more about the Constitution. The words we live by. THE CONSTITUTION The words we live I C II lv 1:" 'y' : ( «‘. UV 'iu( " ! :'ll§l. " . ~.: ur L ". mun : |vlll“. ‘]4 -~ IN’ . ‘ . . ‘Hart '1‘? ! z. .: -' " zhv l'mr-". r“": .iI I‘l‘: i' l' k 4* : ::. mi "
  29. 29. Runyonesque Characters Scali McCabe Sloves was filled vith Runyonesque characters — from :1 promising. young copywriter who Found medical school far easier tha11 writing body copy For Volvo. to a stat man with a higher IQ and 111ore degrees than most CFO‘s. From :1 nianagement supervisor on an airline account stifferiiig from fear offlying. to a11 overeonfident copywriter suffering from delusions ol"adequaey. Ofall the characters that stand out in my mind. there was one whose talent For making even the most complicated idea seem simple and understandable was matched only by his talent for getting into trouble. He had :1 real gil-t for pissing people off. Especially. if you happen to be the Cliiefjustice of the Supreme Court. Anyway. Scali McCabe was asked to produce a campaign for the Bicentennial of the Constitution. Sam had chosen this writer specifically because he was capable of distilling a document as co111plicated as the Constitution down to :1 single phrase: “The words we live by. " They did a superb campaign based upon this idea and presented it to a blue ribbon panel consisting otipeople like Teddy Kennedy and (? l1ief_]ustiee Warren Burger. The campaign was a resounding success. But. _|ustiee Burger had a slight query as to the writer's interpretation. Now. justice Burger's grip o11 the Constitution was slightly tighter than the writer‘s. But don't tell the writer that. Because when justice Burger asked him for clarification. the writer uttered tl1e immortal vords. “Read the Constitution. man. " lt didn't matter that in this case he was dead right. That's not the point. (Anyone can see the point. ) Again_Iustice Burger repeated the question with a sense of disbelief. So the writer repeated the answer with the same conviction. “Read the Constitution. man. " What happened next isn't quite clear. But the art director kicked the writer under the table hard enough to fracture his tibia and fibula. As they were backing o1.1t of the room everyone seem to stare in disbelief. liut anyway the campaign was bought and everyone seemed happy. even Chiefjustice Burger. The point is. you really had to work at Scali to appreciate what that writer had done. It's something ingrained in everyone who ever worked for Ed: an accountability For every spec ofdust on the page. no matter who you happen to be presenting to. It didn't feel like it back then. but those were “the good old days. ” When people worked 'round the clockjust so they could walk out ot. Ed's ofiice feeling a sense of 1-eliefinstead ofnausea. Boy. do I miss that place. BOB NADLIER
  30. 30. There Was This Great Big Gay Named McCabe ’1—here was this great big guy 11:1n1ed McCabe. It was a long time ago. But it was :1 veiy good time. The best time I ever had in advertising. I was at Scali McCabe Sloves when it became Scali McCabe Sloves. Close to seven years. It was an unselfish place then. Rich in talent. Creative people did things they don't do any more. We unabashedly walked into each other‘s offices with our vulnerable. newborn ideas and asked opinions from the very same people we were trying to outdo. We respected and helped each other. In how many places do you see that today? It was all Ed's fault. He united us against him to compete for his approval. It was hard. And it was worth every rewrite. He made us better than we thought we could be. And. at least in my case. he never totiched the work. Sometinies he insulted it. or berated or belittled it. But he never changed it. That was our job. We learned and we grew. Ironic:1lIy it made us stronger and proudcr because it remained our own work. Ray Myers. my mentor. the best person I know from this business. :11id :1 writer Ed once said was even better than he was. initiated 111e into SMS saying. "You've got to get used to rejection. " Sorry. Ray. I never did. But thanks to you :111d Ed. I prospered from it. Sam Scali and Marvin Sloves :1nd Al:111 Pesky and Lon Hultgren 111:1in- t:1i11ed the environment for us and protected it. But Ed created it and made it flourish. Great people :1nd landmark cainpaigns emerged from there. My God. we owned the awards books. We were the best in the business. We knew it. Ed required it. Others may have ditTerent memories ofthosc years. But these :1re mine a11d I cherish them. Thanks. Ed. ToM NATHAN
  31. 31. l’LfteEI11):1'on i1l»u11k'11~4_s: . =fi: .|, .. W1 ; ( ,4. . : ; '<«-*_pv~ -_. . _. ,_! E Hilton “‘l1Il>{t: ll1_‘(1ltf gl. '.'llL5l PK.1l| lL 1984 Doing Time at Scczli My tirstjolu v‘.1s at Me(I.11111—Eriekso11 in CI1ie;1;_: o writing r;1dio eom111erei;1ls for Sears YCIII‘-Elltl X/ ;1s|1er—l )ryer Stiles .1m. I Big '| ‘ruekIo.1d ot'V;1lue< I: ''e11tx. Someliow the experience 't1sn‘t eo11‘i11ei11g 111e (l1‘. ( . l(l'L‘I'[I§II'Ig ’.1 wort|1 doing. Then I saw .1 (Iuuniiimimlion . 'II‘I. ' isxue that IL-.1ttired this .1ge11ey i11 New York (Iity t‘;1lled Senli Me(? ;1be Sloves. “Quick Name A (II1ieken" for Frank l’ertItIe. "I ‘at (Iars Die Yoting" For Volyo. Now thix w;1s 'ot11-stlliltg worth getting up in the niorning for. Eight ye.11~. < and sixjohs I.1ter. I fi11;1IIy had the ttltimzite job title: Copy- writer. Senli Mc(I;1l1e Sloves. I stnretl .1t the work orders on the wall. each emhlttzonetl with the l'.1111ous‘ bold type spre;1tIi11g t1rrog;1nt| y Ii*o111 111.1rgin to 111;1rgi11 'I1ot1tin<v SC/ Ll MCLIAISE Sl. ()VI€S. Wl]; l(L‘'L‘I‘ it was that I I1.1d eome l1.1II'.1y ~.1eross the eo11ti11e11t for. it '. I.' fi11;1lIy I11i11e. Soon enougli. I1o'e'er. e.1I11e the dre.1tIed e;1II Irom Naney Serlin. "Etl ';1m' to see you. " Your heart rockets‘ into your thro.1t. What I1.1d looked hrilIi.111t the seeontl helore . 'utItIe11ly looks like ;1 3—ye;1r—oItl l1.1tI written it. It was without .1 doubt. the |11L). 't i11ti111itI;1ting olliee in the world. complete with .1 hI.1ek leather bo11tI.1ge tIu111111y. I c.1n1e to helieve that art tlII’L‘(T()I' CXI‘[L‘(l .1t Senli solely to get the copywriter otlt of l7.tI's olliee .1live.
  32. 32. The ’0I‘S[ time. I '.1s in there For .111 hour .111d .1 l1.1II'. (A record? ) Someone .1etu.1Ily I1.1d time to run out and get me o11e bottle e.1el1 of.1spirin, MyI.1nt.1 .1I1d St1'es. 't.1l1s. They were w.1iti11g on my desk when I Ii11.1Ily ex‘e.1ped. 'I‘h.1nk (Eod S.11n’s office w.1‘ 11e. 't door. A kind 111.111. A sale l1.1'e11. And .1 line pI2lCL‘ to listen through the 'entiI.1tor to Eel ;111d M.1rvin‘s <ere.1n1ing 111.1te|1es. 'l‘h.111ks to my ti111e .1t Se.1li. I .1111 now Ie.1rle. 's. Nothing could I1e I1.1rder than tl1.1t pl.1ee. (Okay sorry. j.1y. yot1‘1'ejt1.‘t .15 tough. But you're 11ot totIgI1er. ) I've worked .1t te11 .1ge11eie‘. But Se.1Ii is the only one I consider .111 .1l111.1 111.1ter. And I will .1lw.1ys l1.1'e .1 deep .1ITeetio11 For everyone I worked with there. It w.1s w.1r. And we're its vete1‘.111s. IVI/ R'l'Y (IooKr. Friends I here .1re so n1;1ny great stories to write zthout Se.1Ii. but I‘d rather ren1.1in l1'ie11ds with all the people I met there. C/ R()l. I)r. MtsLio Coiusrxrr M: R'l'' (iooxi. & ($111101 I)1:M1~.11o(Io1mr_11
  33. 33. Good Fortune I I1.1d the good fortune to l1.1'e worked .11 l)DlS. _I.1ek Tinker «X I’.1rt11ers. We-lls Rich Greene .111d Sc.1li Me(I.1l1e Sloves‘ e.1eh in its I1eyd;1y. Sc.1li McC.1l1e Sloves 111.1y I1.1'e been the most grueling .1geney III ever worked for (it w.1s. .1Iter .1II. the home ofthe 7: hour d.1y). l‘lI . s'.1y this .1l1out the e. 'perie11ce: I'd never seen or worked with .1 111ore t.1Ie11ted group of writers .1nd .1rt directors‘ i11 one pI.1ce. I I1.1d never won so 1n.111y .1w.1rds‘ i11 so s|1ort .1 time or been prouder ofnty output. Sl/ IS .1Iso 111.1de me re.1lize tl1.1t ilil I1.1d to work so Io11g .111d so I1'.1rd, 111.1_'l1e I should he doing it for II)}''ClI-. Tl1.111k yo11. 5.1111. TI1.111k you. M.1r*i11. 'l'l1.1nk you. Ed. l{o111-;11’1‘ Rr.1‘1‘/ .1=1a1_n VOLVO I he; -:11 Inr pcoplcsshulhink. _: “)7-1
  34. 34. I/ Vorth It I I1.1d been .1t Scali .1 gr.111d tot.1l ofthree days. I w.1s ner'ous as hell about presenti11g to Ed McCabe. .111d I didn‘t exactly ce111e11t our rel.1tionsl1ip with the first ad I showed l1i111. The headline read: “I low .1 Volvo eoriipensates For being short. " Somehow I 111.111.1ged to stay employed. .111d go o11 to do some ofthe best work oli 111y life. Yes. it 'as hard. It was painliil. It was cr.1zy. But 111ost people who worked there — even for .1 few niinutes — will tell you it was worth it. LARRY CADMAN '9-"7 ANNCR: How well does your car stand up to heavy traffic? On Scali McCabe Sloves I I1.1d an interview with Ed Me(I.1be i11_|1111e of 1974. it w.1s the night ofthe One Show. I re111e111ber. The show .1s .1t the X/ aldorf. .111d SeaIi's offices were right .1rot111d the corner. Ed .111d I sat and talked. Or r.1tI1er Ed talked. a11d l.1ugI1ed that nervous I.111gl1 otihis. .1nd I listened. He said that the agency was growing .111d that he needed .1 ‘1iter to work just For |1i111 o11 all ofthe aeeounts that he worked on. He said he I1.1d looked in all ot-the .1w.1rd books .111d I1.1d really liked eve1‘ytI1i11g I I1.1d do11e. He said that it would give 111e .1 chance to do eyerytliiiig. He said that there would be days when it would be the hestjob iii the world. .111d days when it would be the worst. Finally. hejtnnped up. said he I1.1d to go t.1ke .1 piss .111d that I should let him know the next d.1y wI1.1t I wanted to do. I walked o11t. went to the One Show. w.1tcl1ed Scali cle.111 up. and Called Ed first thing i11 the 111or11i11g.111d said. "I'm eo111i11g. " Ed was true to his word. There were days whe11 it w.1s the gre.1test_job and days it was the worst. But alter two years. I left knowing 111ore about how to do great .1d‘erti. s‘i11g t|1a11 I did when I got there. A helluva lot 111ore. RUN 135110511
  35. 35. I/ Vhat Sam Scali Was Like A couple ofthings stand out in my mind when I think about Sam: bull dog tenacity and relentless perseverance. A munber of years ago. Earl Carter and I decided to be pro—aetive with an idea that ve came up with for Hertz. The ad was designed to run during the Christmas holidays and would culminate on New Year's Eve. At the time. there was not a lot ofawareness about the dangers ofdrinking and driving. We thought it would be a great gesture for Hertz. the nation's leading rent-a-ear company, to take a stand on the issue. We knew the ad could be a problem with the client because, unlike other ads. it didn't sell a service. promotion or discount on Hertz ears. Instead, it sold a great attitude about a national problem that we Felt Hertz should address. Earl and I came up with an ad that we truly loved. The visual was a dark. rainy street with a cab driving in the Foreground. The headline said, “lfyou’re going to drink on New Yeans Eve, Hertz would like to recommend another rent-a-ear. " The ad was presented to Sam and he loved it. The final hurdle was the client. They liked the ad. but because it was the end oftheir fiscal year. they had no more money to commit to advertising. When we heard this I remember Earl saying, “This ad is too fucking good for them. They don't deserve it. " Sam very quietly said, “We'll re—present the ad the following year. " Well, 365 days later. Sam was true to his word. Unfortunately. Hertz was in the same financial condition that they were in the previous year. To make a long story short. two years after the original ad was conceived. it was presented again. This time the client bought it. We were told that the CEO of Hertz received numerous calls from his triends in the rent-a-car industry — all congratulating him. Months later. we received the ultimate compliment when the ad won a One Show pencil in the full page newspaper category. So. Earl Carter and I would belatedly like to take this opportunity to say. "T/ imile you Smujitr your lmll dog mIm'i'! y and rcI<'nIlcs. s pci'sci-ci'mIa'. " STEVE lVl()N'l‘(Z()MI£RY
  36. 36. _IfyQup1antodnnk this holiday season, Hertz _wou1d111<etorecommend ‘a another rent—a-car It-tram‘: just run . a tan mitvxilacnv: np,1ii ln). ’(i It always .1ma'/ es me when you hear about a young writer or art director who only wants to 'orl' on TV, Maybe its the glitter of"Hollywood. " the allure ol‘ working with a famous director or e'en the panache of eating at a trendy I. .A. restaurant. Al Scali. on the other hand. the point oliyiew 'as‘iust to do something “great. " It didn‘t matter what it was. It could be a small space newspaper ad. a direct response piece or even a sales promotion brochure. And it only had to be one thing: great. To the young rebels 'ho_just want to work on TV. Ed Mc(Iabc probably summed it up best: "III/ ii_m'ri¢' iI'. Iii‘/ iclii/ I_QcIn suiil, ‘I Jon "I do i‘¢'i/ irrgs. S'l’liVI-1 lVI()N’l’(J()i'Il£| {'
  37. 37. WHEN YOU BUILD THE RIGHT KIND OF CAR YOU DON'T HAVE TO PAY PEOPLE TO BUY II Vim ittam. SWEEPS tumttttt , o-_: '-. 1.. .. um. bout“ . '.. "f: ..f‘: i‘. .‘. '., :'. '.'. ':': :': ::. .‘ T5"; a‘. ’,°§. ‘,. ,m$.2mattt ‘ isn't the best thing 3b°“ aSaab. 5;. -.t;98.. ... ... ... _.. t'I50 wt. ..-r Saab c. tr. t:I t. v.Is. .$§9}'_) _ Saahmrbo . ... ... .3250 Ielutr Did it rt er occur In mu that the ntme a t~. trtnaI. t1 uIIcI wt: in hu) : l ml the Ins at he | IItll| ‘.IhI} has to nllt-r'. ' II it ll . }ItIt'tI en nut and look In! the cut that olh-ml the lIl'. lIII | )0IllIr rebate. ()1 mile: tel. no Il’bZlll' at all. ‘I hi line 0| rt-awaiting uuuld nlttittalel I -ml . r Inrldlihlc lIl‘ lot the II| I!ll‘_. III Int’ atwtdinu In an ttttlcpetttlt-at IIl'}. ttturr mu uIu avuten rated their tar an ct lcnl talue luv the II1ID| 'M’_ than tltet-nut-rsnl tIll(IllI| ‘rI| I'. Iht'NIl‘I|1lllI€ I: Itl and IermIt. ' I In .1 mtttplt-Ir line ol 'ulvns lo cltouse frnm. I. er_t| tiIn_- Irmn tltt-ecunmv -Jcyliutlerx It| IIIt' pmterlttl ‘-tn lothe all new Ilitwls. S4: Mn nwn : ear 4tmt‘<uIt‘ has paitl gun to VOLVO hu_'. ‘ “II1'll}| II1 can hu_ a car it u. t_ In tmu, cat }m. I tan h('l| l‘‘ m. toso
  38. 38. A Barrel Full ofMo1/zleeys I consider mysell‘ one of‘ the fortunate creative people in advertising for having the opportunity to work with Sam Scali and Ed McCabe. For me. however. it was never really work. Not that it was easy -— it wasn't easy at all. Sam and Ed created an atmosphere that inspired you to bring out your best. UIili)rtiiii: itL'l)'. For some people fear was the only thing that could inspire them to be creative. For these people it was not only work. it was torture. This torture that they endured was possibly brought about by Ed's refusal to admit to himself‘ that he had made a mistake and hired someone who didn't belong at Scali McCabe Sloves in the First place, or it was simply part of his own creative process to make everyone who came through his door a writer. He once boasted that he “could make a writer out ofa monkey. " And. I nmst say. over the live years that l spent at Scali McCabe Sloves. I witnessed Ed give new meaning to the phrase “a barrel full olimonkeys. " Today l believe there are many people and many “monkeys" that owe their careers to Sam and Ed. Some of these people own their own businesses and some ofthese “monkeys. ” unfortunately. thanks to Ed. have become creative directors. It has been acknowledged that unlike Edis ability to motivate people by getting in their faces. Sam's style was to get behind his creative teams. (I prefer this method. ) ll‘ Sam believed in the work and the people who created it. his loyalty to them was second to none — they were Family in his eyes. Sam rallied behind his creative teams and 'atched out for them. His trust enabled his staiTto do exceptional work under his supervision. So when a management team had to postpone a meeting and the client had to wait. it was always worth waiting for. This work ethic didntiust win every and any advertising award that came along. it built brands For their clients. And. in doing so, it built .1 brand ol- advertising that represented Scali McCabe Sloves and nobody else. They say people left the agency because oliEd and canine back because of Sam. Some people came and left three times. But none of this matters. X/ hat matters is the Fact that when they finally left (even iliit took them three tries) they left as better advertising prolessionals. Other agencies and their clients benelited by hiring these well—trained people. Sam and Eds contributions run deep into the ranks of most agency rosters. Many people are proud to have worked at Scali McCabe Sloves and. like me. at any opportunity. never hesitate to let people know. Thank you. Sam and Ed. from all of us that have passed through your doors. _]lM l’uIuu= .1"i'i
  39. 39. I/1'1/id Memories My most vivid memories of I: painfully glorious years at Scali Mc(Iabe Sloves go back to my very Iirst assignment: International Correspondeiice Schools. They had come from Scranton. Pennsylvania to get some olithat tough-minded advertising we had been doing For Volvo. My art director. Paul (iuliner. and I were both new to Scali. And we were determined to prove our worth. working into the night with a fervor bordering on the psychotic. On the morning olithe presentation. I walked into the coliicrcnce room. shocked to see a crowd that could have tilled Alice Tully Hall. Every I(IS instructor and assi. ‘t'. lnt book- keeper had been invited. Alier the small talk and strategic setup. I rose to present the lirst ad. The visual showed an ingratiating young man sitting beside his wife at the dinner table. passing the peas to an older woman who was clearly quite fond of him. The headline read: "It you can handle your mother—in—l. iw. you can program computers. “ Hardly a tough- mindcd Volvo ad. The room was silent —— an oil painting. And it only got worse. As I presented ad upon ad. the only sounds in the room were the hollow. echoing giilii1's of Paul (iuliner. Over the next three months. Paul and I continued to toil into the night. creating campaign alter campaign. They hated them all. Finally. desperate to get something produced. we presented .1 giant blowup ofa matchbook. The cover read. "l/ laybe youid smoke less il' you enjoyed yourjob more. " Inside 'as the obligatory ICS coupon. "Youive got to be kid- ding. “ snarled the VI’ oliadvertising. “We run that. we alienate the entire tobacco industry. “ And so they returned to Scranton. never having run .1 single line oliour work. A few days later. Mc(I. ibc lalled Inc into his otlice. I entered. my heart in my throat. prepared to be ; i.'ed. "Mike. " said Ed. “I just wanted you to know that I thought the work you did on l(IS was terrific. live decided to put you on Volvo. " MIKE l)R. v7.l‘-. I' we: -his-k. n.l . - I-«nun an . ... n¢y. t1r4» In Av pt «nu Jw hm. lnmu l 5.: mlmt Lilla . I)Iul M an. . -u. l In-. Lu‘; in-Ana ism mm: -». .~ A. .. u u| 'Vl ah --4.. . ; w--~----~h “wmrs TNEPOINTDFTALKING, “. .. .,. ... ... mu nau'rus11:NmM£, AurwAx" in ya. .. i. ... ~.. -., ..: .i. .. ..n. ... , . ... ,.. m.s. ;., ... w.. -.a -. s,. ... u.n : .m. ... a. in. .. vnuhvugu-J is [nu . . lnr. n. -.. A-. h: .1. luau Jun! .5.. . yr: -n. .. .n. -. w us. -.4 -van. . -v. ... ... ... run . .a 1.. .: am . . ti. on . . svm s. .t. . -tut-tultlsx u-JIM-on FII. vhxV| V In . ... 5.. .. Ann. .. nl-nlu| u. .' is Vlflnfll hm ‘ v n. l-vi-. thv u -. u-bunlanlhhsruw lurlv--«III . .m . |r. nl-nIi. N‘lI. v k (L (uJ. v«: vJsn Mn» odvnw-51.5-xgs ''l]~ 1-mv. tgmnnmnq -Jun hum W7‘)
  40. 40. April Fools’ Day, 1971 I started at Scali McCabe Sloves on April Fools‘ day in l()7I. And For the next I3 years. I had the chance to work at a small creative agency. a midsize creative agency and an international creative agency all with the same name. It was a wonderful time. It gave me the chance to move from research to account management to agency management. It gave Inc the chance to grow and learn and understand all that's brilliant and great and glorious about advertising. and it gave me the chance to learn and understand all that's dreadful and awful and destructive about advertising. When I started, the agency was in its Fourth year and already gaining Fame For their spectacular Volvo work. Then came Perdue and Maxell and Pioneer and (lastrol and Sperry and Barney's and Texas Air and Hertz and more. much more. There was a great sense of clarity about the agency. It was (despite the specific year) still the '60s. There was a spirit ofenergy and newness and a connectivity with the sec- ond generation oliaclvertisingls creative revolution. Not the | )I)B school but the PKL school and the Carl Ally school. With the exception of Ed. the other partners had all worked together on the Xerox account at I’KL. And they had all done great work together. They needed a brilliant copywriter and Found one. The stories about Ed are legendary and, For the most part. are true. A man passionately committed to creating bold and brilliant advertising and to being boldly and brilliantly successful. And like so many advertising legends. he wasn'tjust great at writing copy but great at doing advertising. He thought in strategic and media and promotional terms as much as in TV or print terms. I3ut at times. his intensity went over all kinds of‘ boundaries and lines with his partners and his clients and with his employees. At any other agency the intensity would have turned destructive. But the greatness ol~Scali, in those days. was the Imlmirc ofpartners not the greatness ofone. The agency was started by live equal partners: Marvin Sloves, Sam Scali, Ed McCabe. Len Hultgren and Alan Pesky. Marvin brought a sense ofculture and relevancy and Fatherhood. Alan a sense of practicality. and support and business perspective. Len a sense oliresearch and sensitivity and hunianity. And Sam :1 sense ofelegance and style and belief. Together they presented a balanced view ofthe magic all clients look for From agencies: smart thinking. insightful strategy. strong business understanding. trustworthy relationships and brilliant. explosive creative energy. The balance allowed them to spread partners across more accounts as the agency grew. The balance allowed oftsetting strengths and weaknesses. the balance allowed lunacy and clarity. The balance allowed street sntarts and cultured understanding. The balance allowed violence and civility. And ego and htnnility. The balance allowed For great advertising to be approved and produced and run. No one person or two ran SMS. they all did, they were all responsible For their greatness and the greatness oftheir advertising and their success. BUB SCHMI-1'l"l'l-IRI-ZR
  41. 41. It was I987. we were at Pinnacle Peak. a cowboy steak liouse outside Scottsdale. Arizona. It was a wild place with liuiidreds ofneckties hanging from the ceiling. Waiters with scissors would cut them offanybody dumb enough to walk in wearing one. We had just left the headqii. irters ofArniour I)iaI after presenting our eighteenth c. in1p. iign for a new soap product nobody seemed to want to launch. We were sliootiiig wild turkeys and had bagged four or five each when we noticed offin the corner a pliotogr. ipliei"s period set complete with costiiincs. _]()IlN DAN/ ,.»
  42. 42. THE ONE CLUB FOR ART & COPY 32 ISAST ZIST STREET NEW YORK, NY 10010

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