SAISD FOOD SERVICE                                  SAFETY TRAINING                                      2011 - 2012  SAIS...
PreventionRegular stretching and strengtheningexercises for your work activities, as     part of an overall physical condi...
LET’SMOVE
OBJECTIVESBy the end of this session, employees should understand:      The Importance of Safety     How to take an Acti...
FOOD SERVICE OVERVIEW Claims Cost and History Slips & Falls Cuts, Lacerations &  Punctures Sprains & Strains Kitchen ...
FOOD SERVICE  Reported Claims
Lost Time & Medical Data302520                                                                Lost Time                   ...
Percentage of Reported Claims
KITCHEN SAFETY
Food service professionals face a wide range of risksthroughout the course of any given day. Taking measuresto promote saf...
Common Types & Sources of        InjuriesPreparation                            StorageCuts                               ...
SLIPS & FALLS
In a High-Traffic workplace such as a school cafeteria, there is the potential for SLIPs & FALLs.Because of Liquid Substan...
When cleaning tables make sure that you donot drop water on the floor. If water dropson the floor make sure it is cleaned ...
Ways you can help to prevent       Slips & Falls Take your time & Pay attention  Clean up spills immediately              ...
Matching Exercise                Match the items on the left            with appropriate actions on the rightMaintain Secu...
Preventing  Cuts
Cuts, Lacerations and PuncturesFood service almost always means thepresence and use of sharp knives, tools andappliances. ...
WHEN              Peeling, Dicing, or Slicing    Pay                                          Keep your                   ...
Sprains & Strains
STRAINS & SPRAINS     The most common affected area is                The Back
Strains & SprainsReachingLiftingAwkward Body MovementsImproper Body Mechanics
Protecting Your Back    As a Food Service worker you must be      aware of proper techniques when:  Lifting:Pots and PansM...
Lifting Trash BagsTips and Improvement ideas• Do not overfill or compact trash in the barrel.• Empty the barrels when they...
Lifting Trash Bags Before pulling the bag:• Look for any sharp or protruding objects.• Check the load and get help if it i...
Lifting Trash BagsThen:• Tie the bag.• Remember to bend your knees, keep the load close to your body keep your back straig...
INCORRECT LIFTING:  Never Bend at the Back
CORRECT LIFTING TECHNIQUE      Always Bend at the Knees
Proper Lifting Technique      Step by Step         Guide
Proper Lifting Technique1. Stand close to the loadwith your feet spreadapart about shoulderwidth with one footslightly in ...
Proper Lifting Technique2. Squat down bendingat the knees. (Not yourwaist) Tuck your chinwhile keeping your backas vertica...
Proper Lifting Technique3. Get a firm grasp ofthe object beforebeginning the lift.
Proper Lifting Technique4. Begin slowly liftingwith your legs bystraightening them.NEVER TWIST YOURBODY DURING THISSTEP!!!
Proper Lifting Technique5. Once the lift iscomplete, keep theobject as close to thebody as possible.
Two/Three Man Lifting6. Decide who will be incharge BEFORE youbegin the lift, and whatcommands will be used.
BURNS
BurnsIn the kitchen workers are regularly exposed   to hot cooking utensils, hot ovens, open flames, hot water and steam. ...
Gory burning accident in the         kitchen
BURNS      Results primarily from:  Contact with HOTsurfaces, HOT cookingpans, HOT substances
Burns and Scalds  can be avoided with good kitchenSAFETY PRACTICE
Precautions To Prevent Burns    Use PPE:                              Pay Attention:       Aprons                         ...
ELECTRICAL      SAFETY
Electrical Hazards            DO                         DON’TUse plugs that fit the outlet     Overload outletsCheck wire...
Fire Response Know location of fire  extinguishers Use the right  extinguisher for the job Know how to use  extinguishe...
Know The “PASS” System PULL THE PIN AIM AT THE BASE OF THE FIRE SQUEEZE THE TRIGGER SWEEP SIDE TO SIDE
CHEMICAL SAFETY
Material Safety Data Sheets         (MSDS)SAISD website: Departments, Facility Service, Environmental, QuickLinks, then MS...
When Using ChemicalsUse appropriate Personal Protective Equipment.Know the name of the Chemical you are using.      Never ...
Reporting Procedures
REPORTING PROCEDUREEmergency (Life threatening)Respond in this order:   1) Call 911   2) Call SAISD Police   3) Call Emplo...
REPORTING PROCEDURENon-Emergency (Not Life threatening)Respond in this order: 1) Report Accident to Administration or     ...
D14-AREPORT OF ACCIDENT FORM
57
D14-A
SAISD OHS Specialists              Contact Information:Tywanda Walker, OHS Specialist (210)554-8545Michael Gilbert, OHS Sp...
Food service safety training 2011 2012
Food service safety training 2011 2012
Food service safety training 2011 2012
Food service safety training 2011 2012
Food service safety training 2011 2012
Food service safety training 2011 2012
Food service safety training 2011 2012
Food service safety training 2011 2012
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Food service safety training 2011 2012

1,305 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,305
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
54
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Slide Show Notes In this exercise, see if you are able to match the items on the left with appropriate actions on the right. Remember, there are all types of things you can do to help keep your workplace safe. OK Now let’s see if you matched them correctly. To maintain security, you should report suspicious mail. To stay informed, contact a safety committee member with safety ideas. To maintain good housekeeping, keep walkways and stairways clear. To identify hazards, keep alert for safety hazards, and To prevent violence, show respect for people even if they are upset.
  • When lifting with 2 or 3 people, please follow the same 5 steps on lifting safely. Lifting a load in cooperation with others is quite difficult. Two people should not attempt to lift a load that represents their combined capability. It is recommended that two people should only lift two thirds of their capability, and three people should lift half of their capability. Lack of coordination of such a lift can easily lead to injury for one or more members of your team. Make sure aisles and pathways are free and clear of obstacles.
  • Slide Show Notes Electrical hazards are present in every workplace. Here are commonsense precautions you can take to stay safe around electricity: Use plugs that fit the outlet. Do not alter plug to make it fit; Check electrical wires and insulation for equipment you use; Make sure electrical connections are tight on equipment you use; Keep material that could burn or ignite away from electrical outlets; and Keep a clear access to the electrical access panels and boxes. Here is what you should not do to stay safe around electricity: Do not overload electrical outlets; Do not fasten cords with staples, nails, or anything that could penetrate the insulation; Do not run cords through water or wet spots, and don’t touch cords with wet hands; Do not use damaged cords; and Do not use ungrounded cords or equipment, or remove the grounding prong from a three-pronged plug. Make sure you take the specific electrical precautions required in our facility. Modify this slide to the electrical requirements of your facility or office.
  • Slide Show Notes If you are trained and authorized to use a fire extinguisher, take these steps to respond to fires: Make sure you know where the nearest fire extinguisher is to your work area at all times. Note the location of extinguishers whenever you work in a new area, even if only temporarily. Be sure the extinguisher is designed to fight the type of fire you have. For example, only certain extinguishers can be used for electrical fires. Check the label to be sure. To use a fire extinguisher, remember the acronym “PASS”: P ull the pin; A im the hose at the base of the fire; S queeze the trigger to release fire-retardant material; and S weep the hose back and forth low across the fire. Make sure you know how to use the fire extinguishers in our facility. If you took a tour to start this session, remind participants where the fire extinguishers are located. If not, use a site map to point them out. Bring a fire extinguisher and demonstrate how to use it. Or ask a participant to come up and demonstrate it.
  • Food service safety training 2011 2012

    1. 1. SAISD FOOD SERVICE SAFETY TRAINING 2011 - 2012 SAISD EMPLOYEE BENEFITS, RISK MANAGEMENT & SAFETY 2011-2012Your Name Here Event Title Here Date
    2. 2. PreventionRegular stretching and strengtheningexercises for your work activities, as part of an overall physical conditioning program, can help tominimize your risk of SPRAINS and STRAINS.
    3. 3. LET’SMOVE
    4. 4. OBJECTIVESBy the end of this session, employees should understand:   The Importance of Safety  How to take an Active Role in Workplace Safety  How to Protect Yourself and Co-Workers against common Safety issues.  How to Identify, and/or Report Safety concerns.  Ways of Preventing Accidents in the Kitchen.  How to Report Accidents. SAISD EMPLOYEE BENEFITS, RISK MANAGEMENT & SAFETY 2011-2012
    5. 5. FOOD SERVICE OVERVIEW Claims Cost and History Slips & Falls Cuts, Lacerations & Punctures Sprains & Strains Kitchen Burns Electrical Safety Chemical Safety Reporting Procedure
    6. 6. FOOD SERVICE Reported Claims
    7. 7. Lost Time & Medical Data302520 Lost Time Medical1510 5 0 Elementary Middle High School Academy Non-Campus School School
    8. 8. Percentage of Reported Claims
    9. 9. KITCHEN SAFETY
    10. 10. Food service professionals face a wide range of risksthroughout the course of any given day. Taking measuresto promote safe practices and prevention can helpdecrease your chances of injuries.
    11. 11. Common Types & Sources of InjuriesPreparation StorageCuts Heavy LiftingBurnsServing GeneralSlips & Falls Electrical Cleaning Hazardous Chemicals
    12. 12. SLIPS & FALLS
    13. 13. In a High-Traffic workplace such as a school cafeteria, there is the potential for SLIPs & FALLs.Because of Liquid Substance and Foods being wasted on the floor. Always Use “Wet Floor Signs”
    14. 14. When cleaning tables make sure that you donot drop water on the floor. If water dropson the floor make sure it is cleaned upImmediately.Always remember to put “Wet Floor” sign out when the floor is wet or there is a spill.
    15. 15. Ways you can help to prevent Slips & Falls Take your time & Pay attention Clean up spills immediately & ALWAYSUse wet floor signs when needed
    16. 16. Matching Exercise Match the items on the left with appropriate actions on the rightMaintain Security Keep walkways and stairwells clearStay Informed Contact a Safety Specialist with safety ideasGood Housekeeping Report Safety Concerns Pay AttentionIdentify Safety Concerns Keep alert for SafetyAwareness Concerns
    17. 17. Preventing Cuts
    18. 18. Cuts, Lacerations and PuncturesFood service almost always means thepresence and use of sharp knives, tools andappliances. So PAYING ATTENTION andSTAYING FOCUS is very important whenusing these items.
    19. 19. WHEN Peeling, Dicing, or Slicing Pay Keep your Eyes open on Attention your work Use Mesh Use the rightCutting Gloves knife for the jobUse a cutting Board Cut away from your bodyKeep fingers and thumbs out of the way Store knives properly
    20. 20. Sprains & Strains
    21. 21. STRAINS & SPRAINS The most common affected area is The Back
    22. 22. Strains & SprainsReachingLiftingAwkward Body MovementsImproper Body Mechanics
    23. 23. Protecting Your Back As a Food Service worker you must be aware of proper techniques when: Lifting:Pots and PansMilk CratesBoxes and Can goodsFrozen FoodsTrash Bags
    24. 24. Lifting Trash BagsTips and Improvement ideas• Do not overfill or compact trash in the barrel.• Empty the barrels when they become HALF FULL. #1 Reported Cause is Lifting Trash Bags
    25. 25. Lifting Trash Bags Before pulling the bag:• Look for any sharp or protruding objects.• Check the load and get help if it is too heavy
    26. 26. Lifting Trash BagsThen:• Tie the bag.• Remember to bend your knees, keep the load close to your body keep your back straight and do not twist.
    27. 27. INCORRECT LIFTING: Never Bend at the Back
    28. 28. CORRECT LIFTING TECHNIQUE Always Bend at the Knees
    29. 29. Proper Lifting Technique Step by Step Guide
    30. 30. Proper Lifting Technique1. Stand close to the loadwith your feet spreadapart about shoulderwidth with one footslightly in front of theother for balance.
    31. 31. Proper Lifting Technique2. Squat down bendingat the knees. (Not yourwaist) Tuck your chinwhile keeping your backas vertical as possible.
    32. 32. Proper Lifting Technique3. Get a firm grasp ofthe object beforebeginning the lift.
    33. 33. Proper Lifting Technique4. Begin slowly liftingwith your legs bystraightening them.NEVER TWIST YOURBODY DURING THISSTEP!!!
    34. 34. Proper Lifting Technique5. Once the lift iscomplete, keep theobject as close to thebody as possible.
    35. 35. Two/Three Man Lifting6. Decide who will be incharge BEFORE youbegin the lift, and whatcommands will be used.
    36. 36. BURNS
    37. 37. BurnsIn the kitchen workers are regularly exposed to hot cooking utensils, hot ovens, open flames, hot water and steam. As well as hot foods and liquids. As a result, food service workers are sometimes at risk for burn injuries.
    38. 38. Gory burning accident in the kitchen
    39. 39. BURNS Results primarily from: Contact with HOTsurfaces, HOT cookingpans, HOT substances
    40. 40. Burns and Scalds can be avoided with good kitchenSAFETY PRACTICE
    41. 41. Precautions To Prevent Burns Use PPE: Pay Attention: Aprons Don’t be in a RushBurn guard arm sleeves Don’t be distracted Pot holders Gloves Oven Mittens Take Safety Measures Open lids away from you Never lift hot items that are too heavy for one personSAFETY STARTS WITH YOU
    42. 42. ELECTRICAL SAFETY
    43. 43. Electrical Hazards DO DON’TUse plugs that fit the outlet Overload outletsCheck wire and cord Fasten cords withinsulation staples, nailsKeep flammables away Run cords through water orfrom outlets touch cords with wet handsKeep clear access to electrical Use damaged cordsboxes Use ungrounded cords or remove grounding prong from a three-pronged plug
    44. 44. Fire Response Know location of fire extinguishers Use the right extinguisher for the job Know how to use extinguisher:  Pull the pin  Aim hose at fire base  Squeeze trigger  Sweep hose back and forth. Keep your back to an Exit.
    45. 45. Know The “PASS” System PULL THE PIN AIM AT THE BASE OF THE FIRE SQUEEZE THE TRIGGER SWEEP SIDE TO SIDE
    46. 46. CHEMICAL SAFETY
    47. 47. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)SAISD website: Departments, Facility Service, Environmental, QuickLinks, then MSDS Digital Library.
    48. 48. When Using ChemicalsUse appropriate Personal Protective Equipment.Know the name of the Chemical you are using. Never place chemicals around Food. Never mix chemicals
    49. 49. Reporting Procedures
    50. 50. REPORTING PROCEDUREEmergency (Life threatening)Respond in this order: 1) Call 911 2) Call SAISD Police 3) Call Employee Benefits, Risk Management and Safety OHS Professional on Call 24/7
    51. 51. REPORTING PROCEDURENon-Emergency (Not Life threatening)Respond in this order: 1) Report Accident to Administration or Supervisor within 24hr. 2) Contact School Secretary for ROA (D-14) 3) Complete Report of Accident (D-14), it must be signed by Employee & Supervisor 4) Fax to Employee Benefits, Risk Management & Safety Department 5) A Safety Specialist will contact you immediately upon receiving the Report.
    52. 52. D14-AREPORT OF ACCIDENT FORM
    53. 53. 57
    54. 54. D14-A
    55. 55. SAISD OHS Specialists Contact Information:Tywanda Walker, OHS Specialist (210)554-8545Michael Gilbert, OHS Specialist (210) 554-8544Anna Llamas, OHS Specialist (210) 554-8543 Belen Sanchez, OHS Support Main Safety Number (210) 554- 8540 or 554-8541 Fax: (210) 228-3107 A Safety Specialist is On-Call 24 hrs/ 7 days a week.

    ×