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InMete 55+ resource pack with examples

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InMete 55+ resource pack with examples

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InMete 55+ resource pack with examples

  1. 1.  Resource pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers Published by the partners of the “Innovative methods for increasing effectiveness of teaching English of 55+ learners” Project Erasmus+ Project, Key Action 2 – Strategic Partnerships with examples and didactic materials for teachers
  2. 2.  Contributing authors: Teresa Anelli (Italy), Beatrix Bajnóczi (Hungary), Agnieszka Baran (Poland), Gyöngyi Bódiné Gál (Hungary), Andrea Ciantar (Italy), Loredana Golob (Italy), Manuela Gazzano (Italy), Kirsi Haavisto (Hungary), Barbara Kaszkur-Niechwiej (Poland), Anna Payne (Poland), Malwina Szeliga (Poland), adult learners taking part in the project. Project logo designer: Andrea Sinka (Hungary) Kraków (Poland), Rome (Italy), Szeged (Hungary), 2014-2016
  3. 3. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 3 Table of contents Introduction – The InMETE 55+ Project ....................................................... 4 The Project Partners ....................................................................................... 7 General Tips for Teachers .............................................................................. 9 Teacher’s Guide – elements description .................................................... 12 Vocabulary ............................................................................................ 14 Songs and music ................................................................................. 43 Outdoor and physical activities .......................................................... 52 Inventing stories .................................................................................. 65 Socializing ............................................................................................ 84 Performances ....................................................................................... 95 Summary ...................................................................................................... 111 Appendix ...................................................................................................... 113
  4. 4. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 4 Introduction – The InMETE 55+ Project Teaching foreign languages, especially English, to seniors, is becoming one of the most crucial elements of education in later-life in Europe. Existing analysis concerns mainly the needs and current state, but there are not enough didactic materials which would support teachers in their daily work with learners 55+. This concerns in particular those materials that go beyond the traditional language course, and include such elements that are emotionally engaging, motivating, and provide new incentives: mental, physical and sensory - so essential in later-life pedagogy. To address this deficiency a partnership was formed which consists of 3 organizations from Poland, Hungary and Italy, possessing considerable experience in senior education, especially in language teaching and represent a complementary approach, including academic. This has enabled the partners to identify the most urgent needs and gaps in language teaching (especially English) to older learners and to propose innovative solutions to address them. The Fullness-of-Life Academy Association from Krakow, the Courses Educational and Cultural Association from Szeged and the Italian Federation for Continuing Education from Rome gathered together to realize the Erasmus + Project “Innovative methods for increasing effectiveness of teaching English of 55+ learners” (InMETE 55+). The project has a form of “Strategic Partnership”, done under the Key Action 2 from September 2014 to August 2016. The project goal is to develop tangible propositions of innovative methods for increasing effectiveness of teaching English to 55+ learners. Through well-structured cooperation, researches, discussions, international meetings, three tangible intellectual outputs of the project be prepared:
  5. 5. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 5 a. resource pack of possible resources: materials, ideas and guidelines which could be used during the English lessons to increase cognitive functions of elderly learners, in particular, their attention, motivation, emotional involvement, memory functioning, senses and body involvement, communication sensitivity and capability, and also their well-being; b. nine detailed lesson outlines together with teaching/learning materials for teachers and students (each for two levels: elementary (A2-B1) and intermediate (B2) including innovative elements taken from external sources like art, historical heritage of our countries, memory rules and methods, music, poetry, body expression and para-theatrical forms, etc.; c. two curricula for a one-year (60 hrs) course for learners 55+, two levels - elementary (A2-B1) and intermediate (B2). These three products will be available free of charge for seniors’ educators from the non-profit sector. At the end of the project, during dissemination events, all of them will be promoted. In this publication we present the first project product – the resource pack of materials, ideas and guidelines that may be used by teachers of English for seniors. It consists of four parts and appendix. The first two contain general information about the project and partnership organizations. We prepared also some general tips for English teachers who plan to work with 55+ learners. In the main part of the publication educators can find the description of the resource pack elements preceded by general information about its structure.
  6. 6. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 6 APPENDIX: In this section teachers can find Autobiographical tools for learners. This simple tool has been designed to support some important key issues in the learning process of 50+ learners. The aim of this tool is to create deep motivation in learners studying English language; to make them more aware of their capacity and personal preferences and attitudes in the learning process (What’s the best way of learning for me? What are my main difficulties?); to give the learners the chance to share this information with others. Photo by UNIEDA © 2015
  7. 7. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 7 The Project Partners The partnership consists of 3 partners from Poland, Hungary and Italy, who possess considerable experience in senior education, especially in language teaching and represent a complementary approach, including academic. Poland: Stowarzyszenie Akademia Pełni Życia im. Joanny Boehnert The Fullness-Of-Life Academy Association has been working since 2001 with seniors from the Malopolska region of Poland - both from big cities and small towns. The goal has been to improve the quality of older people's life by creating a wide range of educational opportunities for them. Special emphasis is put on giving seniors access to modern computer technology, language learning and the achievements of contemporary science and culture. The Association organises computer courses, language classes, lectures, seminars, memory training, art workshops, and discussion and hobby groups. It also develops teaching/study materials tailored to older people. It carries out innovative educational projects for older people, both locally and internationally. Web page: www.apz.org.pl
  8. 8. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 8 Hungary: Tan-Folyam Oktatási és Kulturális Egyesület The Courses Educational and Cultural Association was founded by adult learners. Its main aims are to promote formal, non-formal and informal lifelong learning and to achieve and maintain mental, physical and social well-being through active learning. It organises and conducts various training workshops and projects related to lifelong learning, for example in language and ICT. The majority of members of the Association are older people and the development of teaching and learning techniques and applications appropriate to the age group is a central interest. Web page: www.tan-folyam.eu Italy: Unione Italiana di Educazione Deglt Adulti (UNIEDA) The Italian Federation for Continuing Education is a national umbrella organisation of 65 Italian adult education organisations. It is a national focal point for the development of an inter-generational pedagogy aimed at different generations and cultures in the name of their common educational needs. As a research and experimentation centre for adult education activities and methodologies, UNIEDA is particularly active in the promotion and dissemination of autobiographical and biographical narrative methodologies and explores their relationship with the memory and learning of older people. It participates in the implementation and dissemination of European Grundtvig projects at national and transnational level and, in 2010, developed for use a model bill on Lifelong Learning, which was regarded as strategic for the achievement of Lisbon objectives and aims. Web page: www.unieda.it
  9. 9. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 9 General Tips for Teachers At the beginning of a course the learners can fill in a questionnaire about the most common problems in learning English. Typical problems which will emerge are: speaking, oral comprehension, irregular verbs, present perfect/past simple, present perfect simple/continuous, future, phrasal verbs, idioms. The result of the questionnaire is important for teachers because they can develop the course by taking into account their students’ necessities. Teachers shouldn’t correct 100% of their students’ mistakes especially during conversation activities and at low levels. Excessive correction could result in the students’ refusal to speak. A good option is to write down the students’ mistakes without interrupting them and to correct them only at the end of the activity. Don’t forget to praise your students for their progress. Some students in particular are very shy and they need to be encouraged. A good way to correct compositions and essays written by students is the “collective correction”: the teacher selects (among the students’ texts) the sentences with the worst (and most interesting!) mistakes and writes them on the board without mentioning the author. In turn the students have to spot the mistake and correct it. Encourage students to use traditional dictionaries and not digital ones. The “effort” of looking up a word helps students fix it in their memory more than a simple click on their pc.
  10. 10. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 10 Adult-students are not just people who are learning a language; the teacher should valorise their personal experiences and background. If they want to share and compare their personal experiences, the teachers should encourage them. Make sure that the material is presented in a suitable way: for example well printed, in fonts which are not too small. Make sure the equipment works properly. For example if you play a song, the quality of the sound must be perfect and the room must not be noisy. If students do not understand a song or a listening exercise, they could be discouraged even if it’s not totally their fault. Don’t use materials (readings, listening, grammar exercises) too difficult for the students’ level. It could result in a general lack of confidence in the class. In general the teacher should motivate the students not to use their mother tongue in class, or to do this to the smallest degree possible. Anyway, at elementary levels, use the students’ language if necessary to make them feel comfortable, especially during the very first lessons when they don’t know the teacher and the other students, and their tension could compromise their understanding.
  11. 11. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 11 In the case of oral activities where every student has to describe something (a holiday, a story, a film) encourage the others to ask their classmate at least one question on the presentation s/he has just given. It will oblige everybody to listen carefully to the presentations. Create an informal relaxed atmosphere. If possible, put the tables in a circle so that everybody can look at each other. Enjoying ourselves is the best way to learn. Sometimes divide the students in teams and organize contests. They increase motivation and let learners socialize.
  12. 12. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 12 Teacher’s Guide – elements description In the resource pack we present 26 elements – our ideas of exercises that may be used by English teachers working with 55+ learners. Each of them may be modified and tried as inspiration to create your own exercises. Elements of the resource pack are presented in three different aspects: 1. DESCRIPTION: In this section there is a general explanation of the element: the approximate time required to perform it, the number of students necessary for the activity, the type of grouping of the class, the materials necessary for the teacher to organize this activity. In this section there is also a detailed description of the different steps of the activity emphasizing the functions and competences covered and the sources which inspired it. In the “comments” additional materials, if available (examples of the activity or photocopiable materials), are mentioned. 2. EXAMPLE: This section is a simulation of the activity that teachers can use as a model to see exactly how the activity works. 3. PHOTOCOPIABLE MATERIAL: This section is represented by ready-to-use papers that teachers can photocopy and distribute to their students before starting the activity.
  13. 13. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 13 The activities of the resource pack can be divided in six different groups: 1. VOCABULARY: The aim of these activities is to enrich the students’ lexicon, the knowledge of synonyms and their spelling. 2. SONGS AND MUSIC: These multisensory activities use songs and music as an instrument to improve the vocabulary, the grammar, the knowledge of idioms and slang but also to evoke feelings and emotions in the class. 3. OUTDOOR AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES: These activities are based on the body expression/movement or aren’t organized in the classroom but outdoor: in a street of the city, in a museum or in a park. 4. INVENTING STORIES: These activities encourage students to use their fantasy to create stories on the basis of very random elements. 5. SOCIALIZING: These activities are ideal at the beginning of a course as “icebreaking” when students don’t know each other but also as warm-up at the beginning of a lesson. Through these activities students often work in team, socialize and discover something about their classmates. 6. PERFORMANCES: In these activities the students become the real protagonists of the lesson. They have to perform a presentation or a role-play in front of the rest of the class, often from the teacher’s desk, which becomes a kind of stage. These activities are ideal to improve the students’ self confidence and overcome their shyness.
  14. 14. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 14 VOCABULARY Element 1 – Categories Element 2 – Guess the word Element 3 – Ten art pictures Element 4 - Memory cards Element 5 – Let’s collect words and expressions related to a topic Element 6 – “Hangman game”
  15. 15. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 15 Element 1 Name: CATEGORIES Approximate time: 25 minutes Number of students: Minimum 6 Type of grouping students: Pair or Group Working Materials needed: Chart to fill in Description: The purpose of this activity is to enrich, improve and correct the students’ vocabulary and their spelling. It is also an opportunity for socialization and having fun. The class is divided into small groups (at least three) of 2-3 people each. The teacher chooses a letter of the alphabet and the students have to fill in a chart. For every line they have to write a word (only one!) starting with the letter given and respecting the category specified at the top of the column (first name; nationality; irregular verbs). The first team that complete all the categories say “stop” and from this moment students can’t write any more. The different teams compare the answers given for every category and write down the score. Three types of scores are possible: 5 points for teams that gave the same answer in a category; 10 points for teams that gave different answers in a category; 15 points in case only one team gave an answer. Before moving to the next letter of the alphabet students calculate the partial score by adding the scores of the different columns. The students have to be as fast as they can in completing their categories. The more original the words they write, the better the scores. This game gives the chance to correct a lot of mistakes but it is essential that the teacher always checks the spelling of the words written by the students. There are different kinds of mistake: spelling mistakes (a job with letter F “fotografer” instead of “photographer”), lexicon mistakes (a nationality with letter
  16. 16. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 16 S “Sweden” instead of “Swedish”), context mistake (things you can forget with letter B “Baby”, which is quite strange!). Main functions: X cognitive functions  attention X emotional involvement  memory functioning  body involvement (expression)  senses involvement X communication sensitivity X communication capability  well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence X socio-cultural competence  pragmatic competence  intercultural competence Sources:  memory rules  memory methods  fine arts  body expressions  literature  music  historical objects  poetry  para-theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the activity available. Photocopiable material available.
  17. 17. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 17 Example: ENGLISH FIRST NAMES JOBS LANGUAGES NATIONALI- TIES ADJECTI- VES HOBBIES SPORTS FOOD DRINKS CITIES IRREGULAR VERBS 5LETTER WORDS I AM AFRAID OF THINGS YOU FORGET WORDS WITH A “W” Albert, Alison actor, actress, artist, astronaut, architect American, Austrian, Argentinian, African abstract, annoyed, anxious, ancient, arrogant athletics, art, aerobics apricot, aubergine, almond Adelaide, Athens arise, awake attic, apple, aware, avoid airplanes, asteroids, astrology, animals answer, appointment address away, awkward, awful, award Fred Fanny fireman, footballer, farmer, florist, film director, fisherman French, Finnish furious, false, full, famous football, films, fishing, fencing, figure skating fish, fruit, French fries, fruit juice Florence, Frankfurt find, fight, fall, feel, forget, forgive false, fight flying, falsity, falling Fire on, formulas, feed animals follow Norman Nelly, Ned nurse, nun, nanny, newsagent Norwegian, Nigerian, Nepalese, Northern Irish natural, naive, normal nasty, naughty netball, nutella, nuts Naples, New York, Nice Newcastle - nanny, noise, north news, nuns names, news, numbers, nothing! now, new, narrow Sharon, Simon secretary, singer, shop assistant Spanish, Swedish, Swahili, Scottish, Swiss, Scandinavian, Saudi Arabian strange, secure, sceptical, scary, strong surfing, scuba swimming, skating, stamps snowboard, sailing, shopping soup, salmon sausage, strawberry, sandwich Sidney, Sheffield, Stockholm see, say, sell, speak, send, sing spice, sorry, spoon, stamp spiders, snakes, spies, spooks, suffering sugar, studying sorrow, saw, subway, sweet Liam, Lucy, Leopold, Laura lorry driver, lawyer, lookalike Lebanese, Libyan, Lithuanian, Latvian long, legal, little, large, lazy, loud lap dance lemon, lime Los Angeles, Liverpool, London, Leeds leave, learn, loose, let, lend leave, legal lizards, lions, loneliness, laws, lies, litter lighter, lipstick, laundry, lyrics luggage, laptop, litter law, low
  18. 18. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 18 ENGLISH FIRST NAMES JOBS LANGUAGES NATIONALI- TIES ADJECTI- VES HOBBIES SPORTS FOOD DRINKS CITIES IRREGULAR VERBS 5LETTER WORDS I AM AFRAID OF THINGS YOU FORGET WORDS WITH A “W” Grace, Gary, Gabriel, George, Gwyneth grocer, , gynaecolo gist, gardener, governor, gigolo, greengrocer Greek, German, Georgian, Greenlandic great, generous, gloomy, general golf, gymnastics, gardening, games, cinema grapes, garlic, grapefruit Geneva, Glasgow, Glouceste r go, get, give, grow glove, group, ghost gangster, gas, ghosts, gun, gorillas, goats gloves glow, grow Colin, Charles, Catherine carpenter, cook, composer, conductor Chinese, Croatian, Canadian, Cuban, Czech, Colombian cosy, cold, childish, comfortable, common, cool, curious cycling, cricket, climbing, chess cheese, chips, carrot chicken, cereals, , cucumber Cardiff, Chester, Chicago catch, cut, come, choose Child, chess, choir cars, criminals, changes, choices coat, contact lenses, children!, car insurance cow, crew. crow, chewing- gum Robert, Ron, Randy, Richard runner, rapper, racing driver Romanian, Russian rich, rare, relaxed, right running, rugby, racing driving, roller skate rice, roast beef Rome, Rotterdam , Reykjavik read, ride, run, ring radio, rainy, rusty, robot racism, rocks, rats, rockets, rain, robbery recipe, rules, rhythm, ring row, raw, rainbow, rewind Peter, Patty, Paul, Philip policeman, painter, pilot, photograph er Portuguese, Polish, Puerto Rican, Pakistani, Peruvian pink, poor, proud, powerful, peaceful pool, painting, photography , piano, polo pineapple, pork, potato, pasta, peas, prawn Perth, Paris, Prague pay, put peace, proud, prawn piranhas, pistol, poison, pit bull, power pill, prescription, passport, password power, prawn, password Bob, Betty, Billy baker, butcher, babysitter, basketball player, barber bodyguard, barman, banker, book seller Brazilian, Bolivian, Belgian, Bulgarian, British big, brown, brave, boring, broken basket, bob, baseball, boxing, beach volley, bowling, bridge, body building bread, blueberry, beer, butter, banana Bristol, Belfast, Birmingha m, Boston buy, bring, begin, become, be beard, beach, brave, bread, bunny bears, beach, bombs, boats, burglars, blood, bulls bill, bag, birthday, book bowling, borrow, brown, below
  19. 19. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 19 ENGLISH FIRST NAMES JOBS LANGUAGES NATIONALI- TIES ADJECTI- VES HOBBIES SPORTS FOOD DRINKS CITIES IRREGULAR VERBS 5LETTER WORDS I AM AFRAID OF THINGS YOU FORGET WORDS WITH A “W” Danny, Donna, Dean dentist, designer, dustman, doctor Dutch, Danish dirty, desperate, dusty dancing, darts, DIY, drawing, dice, downhill, drums, domino donuts Denver, Dublin, Dover do, drink, drive, draw, dream drink, dream, drive death, dentist, devil, demons, dragon, dangers, drugs dream, date, delusion, diet, decision down, dawn Esther, Evelyn, Elle employee, engineer, electrician Egyptian, English, Eskimo, Estonian, Ecuadorian, Ethiopic envious, excellent, expert, elegant, easy English egg, eel Edinburgh eat even, error errors, envy, elephants, elevators, exam, explosions earring, ex, excuse, exam elbow Heather, Henry, Hannah housewife, hairdresser , hacker Hungarian hot, happy, heavy horse riding, hockey, hiking ham, hotdog, hamburger Hamburg, Houston Helsinki, Hastings have, hide, hear, hit drink, dream, drive horses, hippos, hackers, heart attack, horrors, hurricanes handkerchie f, handbag, hangover, homework homework
  20. 20. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 20 Photocopiable material: ENGLISH FIRST NAMES JOBS LANGUAGES NATIONALI- TIES ADJECTI- VES HOBBIES SPORTS FOOD DRINKS CITIES IRREGULAR VERBS 5LETTER WORDS I AM AFRAID OF THINGS YOU FORGET WORDS WITH A “W”
  21. 21. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 21 1. ENGLISH FIRST NAMES (Jim, Mary) 2. JOBS (teacher) 3. LANGUAGES/NATIONALITIES (Italian, Welsh) 4. ADJECTIVES (beautiful) 5. HOBBIES/SPORTS (tennis, dancing) 6. FOOD/DRINKS (meat, beer) 7. CITIES IN ENGLISH (Rome, Berlin) 8. IRREGULAR VERBS (drink) 9. 5-LETTER WORDS (child, apple) 10. I’M AFRAID OF. (darkness, ghosts) 11. THINGS YOU CAN FORGET (keys) 12. WORDS WITH A “W” (bowling)
  22. 22. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 22 Element 2 Name: GUESS THE WORD Approximate time: From 15 to 25 minutes Number of students: Minimum 6 Type of grouping students: Group Working Materials needed: A stopwatch, cards with words Description: The students are divided in two teams. Teams play one at a time and every time they have to choose a student who goes in front of the class to explain to his team the meaning of a word written on a card. To make things easier and faster the teacher passes to the student the cards (usually contained in a box or a sack). The student has to let his team guess as many words as possible in a limited period of time decided in advance (the teacher keeps the time with a stopwatch). If there are any words the student doesn’t understand or which are too difficult to explain he can “leave” them and choose another one (but he can’t leave more than three words during his game). The student can’t use his hands, his body language or his mother tongue to help his team guess the word. Only the team of the student who is explaining the card have to guess the word. If accidentally somebody from the opponent team answers, and gets the answer right, the point is given to the other team. When time is up the student who has explained the words will get as many points as the number of words his team have guessed. Now the game passes to the other team until all the students have played. The teacher can prepare a special prize for the student who has obtained the best score in the game (the best at explaining words to his team). At the end of each game the teacher can stop to explain or clarify the meaning or spelling of some words.
  23. 23. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 23 Main functions:  cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement  memory functioning  body involvement (expression)  senses involvement X communication sensitivity X communication capability  well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence  discourse competence  sociocultural competence X pragmatic competence  intercultural competence Sources:  memory rules  memory methods  fine arts  body expressions  literature  music  historical objects  poetry  para-theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the activity available. Photocopiable material available.
  24. 24. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 24 Example: SHORT – It’s an adjective. It’s the contrary of long. Do you smoke? Yes, I do. This is a ______ answer. If I am not tall I am ______ MODERN- It’s an adjective. It’s the contrary of ancient. Something which is not old. UMBRELLA – You open it when it’s raining. The object you use to protect from the rain. AIR-CONDITIONING – You turn it on in the summer if it’s too hot in the car. TO SMILE – The action you do with your lips when you are happy. The contrary of to cry. TOOTHPASTE– What you put on the toothbrush to clean your teeth. PASSWORD – The special secret word you use to have access to some private information. You have to write it to open someone else’s computer, mobile or mail. TO PAY – The action you do in a shop to buy things. What money is used for. You can do that by credit card or cash.
  25. 25. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 25 Photocopiable materials: Lassie Prince William Bill Gates Ronaldo Bin Laden Shakespeare Zidane Dante Beatles Evita Peron Maradona Fidel Castro Sting Gorbaciov Schumacker Mike Tyson Jhon Paul II Brigitte Bardot Banderas Sofia Loren George Bush Pelè Celentano Pavarotti Madonna Alberto Sordi Tom Cruise Sean Connery Giorgio Armani Nerone Cinderella Princess Diana Snowhite Indiana Jones James Bond Micky Mouse Elton John Liz Taylor Ghandi Liza Minelli VOCABULAR Y PARENTS CANDLE TOURIST FAMILY RADIO WALL FLOOR SOFA TELEVISION WAR SOAP HOTEL PETROL GOLD WATER UMBRELLA UNIFORM UNIVERSITY DISCO SUNFLOWER TOMATO BUTTERFLY BOAT CASTLE MEDICINE RICE SEA HORSE PRISON TOY RAP MUSIC
  26. 26. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 26 POCKET ROSE MONUMENT FIRE TICKET TAXI PRIZE ZOO CRAZY STRONG JELOUS GENEROUS RICH SOFT COMFORTAB LE WET FRIENDLY ISOLATED HUNGRY THIRSTY ANXIOUS LUCKY ROMANTIC DARK NATURAL DEAD SPANISH EMPTY MODERN BLONDE PRETTY INTELLIGENT GEOGRAPHY PUB BANK LAKE COFFEE CHEESE SUGAR JEANS TO COOK TO WAIT TO CRY TO FLY TO WEAR TO LOVE TO DIE TO BUY John Lennon Platinì Frida Kalo Saddam Hussein Batman Superman Grace Kelly Michelangelo Jesus Christ Prince Charles Chopin Agata Christie Bill Clinton Maria Callas Valentino Rossi Cleopatra Mr Bean Sharon Stone Van Gogh Anna Frank Coco Chanel Julius Caesar Elvis Presley Einstein Zorro Pinocchio Bill Gates Lenin Paulo Coelho John Travolta Dolce& Gabbana Pablo Neruda
  27. 27. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 27 Picasso Senna Angela Merkel Gaudì Tarzan Al Capone Richard Gere Oscar Wilde John Keats Lord Byron Mina Al Bano Benigni Spielberg Che Guevara Satan Putin Yuri Gagarin Cassius Clay Eddie Murphy James Dean Prince Ranieri David Beckam Monna Lisa TO ARGUE TO MARRY TO BRAKE TO KILL TO LEARN TO FORGET TO PRAY TO PHONE EASY DRY RAINY INDIAN MODERN FULL FAT HAPPY SICK EXTROVERT ECCENTRIC SEXIST MEDIEVAL INFORMAL COMPLETE PHYSICAL TERRIBLE NICE FOREIGN QUIET OPEN- MINDED SURPRISED CROWDED HARD HEAVY POLITE POLLUTED DISTANT NOBLE HIGH IMPORTANT CULTURAL COLOURED ICY FROZEN SEXY WORRIED ILLEGAL RECENT EFFICIENT
  28. 28. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 28 Element 3 Name: TEN ART PICTURES Approximate time: From 15 to 30 minutes Number of students: Minimum 2 Type of grouping students: Pair or Group Working Materials needed: Art pictures (photocopiable materials) Description: The teacher can use art pictures as a help to teach/revise vocabulary and grammar structures (for example colours, verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs etc.) and to teach/revise skills in describing. A very good example of a picture that can be used is the Children's Games by Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1.), an oil-on-panel painted in 1560. The picture presents children's games.
  29. 29. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 29 Looking at the picture, the teacher can decide to teach/revise colours – for example simply by asking students to name them. The teacher can decide to teach/revise verbs by analysing images from the picture, for example:  play (playing with dolls, sand, the flute, the drum, marbles)  wear (wearing masks)  climb (climbing the fence, the tree)  ride (fence riding, riding a broom)  make (making hats)  shout (shouting into a barrel)  throw (hat throwing)  fly (flying a ribbon on a stick)  build (building a well)  swim (swimming in a river) The teacher can decide to analyse the picture naming nouns (for example a doll, sand, a flute, a drum, a marble, a mask, a fence, a broom, a barrel, a hat etc.), practicing singular and plural form, or countables and uncountables. The teacher can also look for adjectives (e.g. beautiful, ugly, big, small, empty, full, expensive, cheap, old, new etc.), and match opposites, or adverbs (e.g. beautifully, quickly, cheerfully, delicately). The teacher can also ask students to describe the picture or a part of it, to use it as a reason to tell a story or to make sentences. Other pictures that can be also useful:  (2) Mona Lisa - Leonardo da Vinci  (3) Girl with a Pearl Earring - Johannes Vermeer  (4) The Scream - Edvard Munch  (5) The Persistence of Memory - Salvador Dalí  (6) The Birth of Venus – Sandro Botticelli  (7) Bedroom in Arles – Vincent van Gogh  (8) The Judgment of Paris – Peter Paul Rubens  (9) The Swing – Pierre- Auguste Renoir  (10) Ivy Bridge – J.M.W. Turner
  30. 30. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 30 Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement  memory functioning  body involvement (expression) X senses involvement  communication sensitivity  communication capability  well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence  discourse competence X socio-cultural competence  pragmatic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods X fine arts  body expressions  literature  music X historical objects  poetry  para-theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the activity available.
  31. 31. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 31 Example: Other pictures that can be also useful: Mona Lisa - Leonardo da Vinci – possible activities: - describing facial features, - teaching/revising vocabulary connected with body, - teaching/revising the description of a person, - teaching/revising adjectives to describe a person, - building sentences or/and short stories (for example answering questions like What's her name? Where is she from? Has she got any brothers or sisters? How old is she? etc.); can be used together with Girl with a Pearl Earring. Girl with a Pearl Earring - Johannes Vermeer - possible activities: - describing facial features, - teaching/revising vocabulary connected with body, - teaching/revising the description of face, - teaching/revising adjectives to describe a person, - building sentences or/and short stories (for example answering questions like What's her name? Where is she from? Has she got any brothers or sisters? How old is she? etc.); can be used together with Mona Lisa.
  32. 32. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 32 The Scream - Edvard Munch - possible activities: - describing feelings, - answering questions like What the person in the picture is scared of? What can that person think? What can that person see? etc , - describing picture, - describing colours, - talking about emotions. The Persistence of Memory - Salvador Dalí - possible activities: - talking about time, - describing picture, - using a picture as a metaphor, - predicting what the rest of a view that is not captured in the picture looks like. The Birth of Venus – Sandro Botticelli - possible activities: - teaching/revising parts of the body, describing the picture, - story telling answering questions like : Who is she? Who are the others? Where are they? What is going to happen next etc..
  33. 33. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 33 Bedroom in Arles – Vincent van Gogh – possible activities: - describing the picture, - teaching/revising room vocabulary, - practising form there is, there are, - story telling answering questions like Who is living there? What kind of person he/she is?, What is his/her favourite book etc., - teaching/revising prepositions of place (in, on, under, behind, in front of etc.). The Judgment of Paris – Peter Paul Rubens – possible activities: - describing the picture, - teaching/revising body vocabulary, - inventing dialogues between people captured in the picture, practising them, teaching/practising making questions. The Swing – Pierre- Auguste Renoir – possible activities : - describing the picture, - teaching/revising parts of clothes and I am wearing, he/she is wearing form, talking about future plans (tomorrow he/she is going to …) but also past events (yesterday he/she + verb ... ). Ivy Bridge – J.M.W. Turner – possible activities : - describing the picture, - focusing on the details (spotting the ducks, spotting people by the carriage, playing the game I spy with my little eye something beginning with T etc.), - talking about nature features;
  34. 34. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 34 Element 4 Name: MEMORY CARDS Approximate time: From 15 to 30 minutes Number of students: Minimum 2 Type of grouping students: Individual, Pair Materials needed: Pairs of cards with pictures with/without inscriptions/titles/words Description: This activity can be used at any stage of the lesson, serving as a warm-up, learning new vocabulary/grammar, revising vocabulary/grammar or summing up the lesson. Duration time depends on the amount of vocabulary/grammar to be taught/revised and on the level of students. The teacher presents memory cards to the class and explains the rules: students in pairs or in groups of 3-5 shuffle the cards and put them on the table face down. Students in turns pick up two cards looking for hidden pairs of elements (2 cards that look identical). When they find a matching pair of cards they put it away, if the two picked up cards are not matching they go back to the table face down, and the students try to memorise their location – it would be easier for them to find another pair. The person who gets the highest number of pairs, is the winner. As a follow up, the students can make sentences with their cards or ask each other questions about the objects/activities on their cards in mini-dialogues.
  35. 35. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 35 Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning  body involvement (expression) X senses involvement X communication sensitivity X communication capability  well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence X sociocultural competence X pragmatic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods X fine arts  body expressions  literature  music X historical objects  poetry  para-theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the activity available.
  36. 36. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 36 Example: Make dinner Do your homework Have coffee Go shopping Read the newspaper Bake the cake Tidy up the room Ride a bicycle Go to the doctor
  37. 37. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 37 Swim Play tennis Walk the dog Read a book Do the exam Dance Play the guitar Play the violin Write a letter
  38. 38. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 38 Element 5 Name: LET’S COLLECT WORDS AND EXPRESSIONS RELATED TO A TOPIC Approximate time: Minimum 15 minutes Number of students: Minimum 4 Type of grouping students: Pair or Group Working Materials needed: Awards if it’s done as a competition. Paper for making notes. Description: This activity can be used at any stage of the lesson, serving as a warm-up, introducing new vocabulary, revising vocabulary or summing up the lesson. Ideal for vocabulary building. Students are asked to collect words related to a topic by giving them one main word (typically the name of the topic itself). Students have to collect as many words (verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs) and expressions as they can, using the letters of the given words as the first letter of related words. Students can work in pairs or in groups. The pair/group that collected the highest number of words/expressions will win. Also, the most creative pair/group can be awarded. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning X senses involvement X communication sensitivity X communication capability -being
  39. 39. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 39 Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence X socio-cultural competence X pragmatic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the activity available. Example: The teacher writes VALENTINE’S DAY on the board. Students start writing words that come to their mind when thinking of this event. The words and expressions should start with one of the letters of this event. Students must be ready to explain why they think a certain word/expression is related to the topic if it’s not that obvious.
  40. 40. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 40 V violet, very big business, A amazing, attractive, adore, arms, artistic, advertisement, advertise, artificial, admire, amorous, adoration, art, affectionate L love, like, lovesick, lover, lovebirds, lock, lipstick, lips, E eyes, energy, energetic, earrings, exciting, excited, engage, engagement N necklace, never, new life, T tulip, tears, teardrops, together, trip, time, teddy bears, I imagine, idea, idol, idolise, I love you, N E S sweethearts, sweets, sentiments, sentimental, sing, souvenir, sensitive, spend time together, sex, sun, spring, sugar, story, social network, socialising, sell, secret admirer, soul, sexy, star D darling, date, dating, decoration, decorate, daffodil, daisy, drink, diamond, day of lovers, dinner, desire, dear, dearest A Y youth, young, you and me Photo by Tan-Folyam Egyesület © 2014
  41. 41. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 41 Element 6 Name: “HANGMAN GAME” Approximate time: Minimum 5 minutes Number of students: Minimum 3 Type of grouping students: Group work Materials needed: Board and marker Description: The activity can be used at any stage of a lesson: a warm-up, an integral or a concluding part of the lesson. The main aim is to revise, learn, introduce, or practice vocabulary as well as spelling. The teacher draws spaces for the number of letters in a word and students have to guess the word. Students select a letter of the alphabet. If a letter in the word is guessed correctly, the teacher writes it into the correct space. If a letter is guessed which is not in the word, the teacher draws part of the man being hung. Students can also take the role of the teacher and draw the spaces of a word on the board, and the others should guess the correct letters. This classic game is actually a very good way for students to learn how to spell somewhat difficult words. The game can be a competition between teams too. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning X communication capability -being
  42. 42. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 42 Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence -cultural competence X pragmatic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: There are online versions of the game available on the Internet. Not only hangman but other forms (e.g. shark with an open mouth) can be drawn.
  43. 43. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 43 SONGS AND MUSIC Element 7 – How do you feel when you hear this? Element 8 - Songs and their lyrics
  44. 44. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 44 Element 7 Name: HOW DO YOU FEEL WHEN YOU HEAR THIS? Approximate time: From 20 to 30 minutes Number of students: Minimum 2 Type of grouping students: Individual, Pair or Group Working Materials needed: Pieces of music to play, chart to fill (photocopiable materials) Description: This activity can be used at any stage of a lesson (either as a warm-up or as a centre of the lesson or as a concluding part). It can serve as a revising or teaching new vocabulary or grammatical structures. Before playing the pieces of music to the students, vocabulary connected with feelings and moods should be revised/introduced and put on the board or in the notebooks (e.g. How do you feel when you’ve had a good meal? Happy, relaxed, satisfied, full, sleepy, etc. How do you feel when a mad dog is chasing after you? Threatened, terrified, petrified, scared, lost, etc.) So now imagine how you feel when listening to those particular pieces of music. Student describes what feelings/ images/ moods/ pictures/ recollections particular pieces of music evoke.  What do you feel when listening to this music?  What mood/feeling does it evoke?  What images does it create/remind you of?  What do you associate it with?  What pictures/recollections do you have? The teacher plays different pieces of music (from classical to modern) lasting for about 2.00-3.00 min each, for students to listen and take notes. Students can note down their impressions in the chart provided by the teacher.
  45. 45. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 45 Students then compare and discuss their answers either in pairs and/or in a class. The discussion can be continued by asking more general questions to the group. - Do you like music? What kind? - Do you know any musicians? - If you were a musician, what instrument would you like to play? - Do you go to concerts/opera/concert hall/shows, etc.? How often? As a follow-up or homework, the teacher can ask the students to write a short story/description (up to 200 words) connected with/based upon the chosen/favourite piece of music. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning X senses involvement X communication sensitivity X communication capability X well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence X socio-cultural competence X pragmatic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods X fine arts X music -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example available. Photocopiable material available.
  46. 46. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 46 Example: chart + suggested fragments of music Name: Listening to music and describing what feelings it evokes (How do you feel when you hear this?) Example. Piece 1 Piece 2 Piece 3 Piece 4 Piece 5 Johann Sebastian Bach: Air on G String (ca. 2.00 min) Michael Nyman: (The Piano Soundtrack ) The Heart Asks Pleasure First (2.00-3.00 min) Howard Shore: The Fellowship of the Ring - Concerning Hobbits (ca.2.00 min) Astor Piazzolla: Libertango (1.5-2.00 min) Cafe Del Mar / AR Rahman : Mumbai Theme Tune (ca.2.00-3.00 min) Feelings and moods evoked/ images associated with it: I feel: harmonious, calmed down, relaxed, pleasant, etc. or This music evokes: harmony, calmness, relaxation, pleasantness, etc. It reminds me of / I associate it with: a walk in the park on a sunny autumn afternoon, etc. “I can see the seashore and the storm approaching. I feel uneasy, tense, curious.” (adapted from students’ notes) “I feel warm, pleasant, like lying on the meadow on a summer day.” (adapted from students’ notes). “I can picture a man and a woman in a passionate dance of love and hate.” (adapted from students’ notes). “It reminds me of my last holidays to Egypt. I was relaxed, curious and full of energy then.” (adapted from students’ notes).
  47. 47. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 47 *The choice of music depends on the teacher and the group. ** Source: Piece 1 : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMkmQlfOJDk Piece 2 : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=isUz2ufr5t4 Piece 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pGaz_qN0cw&list=PLPgS7uUIUiMDhSaXfVEhw THAb_8Hyj5P&index=4 Piece 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaXNdVTGT0k Piece 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKSVGAAm07w
  48. 48. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 48 Photocopiable materials: Name: Listening to music and describing what feelings it evokes (How do you feel when you hear this?) Piece 1 Piece 2 Piece 3 Piece 4 Piece 5 Feelings and moods evoked/ images associated with it: I feel….. This music evokes…. It reminds me of / I associate it with….
  49. 49. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 49 Element 8 Name: SONGS AND THEIR LYRICS Approximate time: Minimum 15 minutes Number of students: MInimum 6 Type of grouping students: Individual, Pair or Group Working Materials needed: A song and a sheet with the lyrics of the selected song (gapped version) Description: The teacher selects a song and carefully chooses which words to blank out, that is, what lexical area to cover. (e.g. tenses; comparatives and superlatives; etc.) Most students are highly motivated by song-based activities, which they find funny and useful at the same time. There is often a lot of repetition in songs, which can aid long-term memory. Students may retain more vocabulary when presented through a song. Grammar can also be surreptitiously presented or practised through songs. Furthermore, music can relax and stimulate students, and create a pleasant atmosphere for learning. Variation: The teacher cuts up the text into strips in advance. Students reconstruct the lyrics in pairs or groups, and then listen to the song. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning X body involvement (expression) X senses involvement X communication sensitivity X communication capability X well-being
  50. 50. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 50 Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence X socio cultural competence X pragmatic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods X body expressions X literature X music X poetry -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Some examples: “Grammar songs”:  to teach present simple: Eric Clapton / Wonderful Tonight  to teach present continuous: Fool's Garden / Lemon Tree  to teach past simple: Celine Dion / Because You Loved Me “Topic Songs”:  Weather: Madonna / Rain  Shopping: Bruce Springsteen / Queen of the Supermarket  Past times: Abba: Our last summer  Places: Sting / An Englishman in New York Example of the activity available. Example: OUR LAST SUMMER I can still recall our last summer I still see it all Walks along the Seine, laughing in the ___________ Our last summer Memories that remain
  51. 51. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 51 We ______ our way along the river And we ______ ________ in the grass By the Eiffel tower I _______ so happy we had met It was the age of no regret Oh yes Those crazy years, that was the time Of the flower-power But underneath we ______ a fear of flying Of growing old, a fear of slowly dying We ________ the chance Like we _______ dancing our last dance I can still recall our last summer I still see it all In the tourist jam, round the Notre Dame Our last summer Walking hand in hand Paris restaurants Our last summer Morning croissants Living for the day, worries far away Our last summer We could laugh and ___________ And now you're working in a bank The family man, a ___________ fan And your name is Harry How dull it seems Are you the hero of my ___________? I can still recall our last summer I still see it all In the tourist jam, round the Notre Dame Our last summer ___________ hand in hand I can still recall our last summer I still see it all Walks along the Seine, laughing in the ___________ Our last summer Memories that remain
  52. 52. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 52 OUTDOOR AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES Element 9 – Total physical response Element 10 – Try to be a tourist in your own town – street game Element 11 – Quiz in a museum Element 12 - Stretching
  53. 53. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 53 Element 9 Name: TOTAL PHYSICAL RESPONSE Approximate time: 10 minutes Number of students: Minimum 5 Type of grouping students: Group Working/Individual exercise Materials needed: Objects in the classroom Description: This method is based on the coordination of language and physical movement. In TPR, teachers give commands to students in English, and students respond with whole-body actions. This method is excellent to test the comprehension skills of the students at different levels depending on the vocabulary that the teacher wants to use in his imperatives (stand up/sit down/pick up your pen/touch your nose/jump). In a variation of this activity instead of imperatives teachers can say simple sentences (Today is Monday/ Yesterday it rained/ There are 10 people in the class) and students have to take one step right if the sentence is true and left if the sentence is false. The sentences used by the teacher can be structured according to the students’ level. As a result this activity can be used with success starting also from beginners. Teachers can decide to prepare the sentences according to a particular topic that the students are studying (history/music/art/general knowledge) Total physical response can be organized like a competition where the students are gradually out of the game if they don't understand the teacher's commands/sentences. This game is useful for socializing and discovering more about the teacher and the students in the class that can be the protagonists of some sentences. Main functions: X attention al involvement
  54. 54. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 54 X body involvement (expression) X senses involvement X well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence socio-cultural competence Sources: X body expressions -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the activity available. Example: Total Physical Response: imperatives Stand up Walk Run Sit down
  55. 55. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 55 Jump Pick up your pen Put your pen in/on/under the book Open/close the book Point at the window/door Look at the blackboard/floor/ceiling Smile Laugh Cry Touch your nose/eyes/mouth/ears Open/close your mouth/eyes Clap your hands Sleep Eat Drink Write Read Sing Drive Open/close your book Say “hello”/ “your name”/ “the teacher’s name”
  56. 56. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 56 Total Physical Response: true/false- right/left Today is Monday The teacher wears glasses Yesterday it didn’t rain XXXXXX (a student) is wearing a red sweater The sky is blue The grass is green The sun is cold XXXXXX (a student) is a doctor Mona Lisa was painted by Michelangelo Glasgow is the capital of Scotland America was discovered in 1492 A shop assistant works in bank Christmas is on 24th December Muslims go to the mosque on Saturday XXXXXX (a student) is not at school today Madonna is an English singer We have two eyes We have a mouth We have 10 fingers Tomorrow is the 20th March The teacher is wearing a watch
  57. 57. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 57 XXXXXX (a student) is from Milan (a city) Vegetarians don’t eat meat The first World War started in 1915 There is a television in our class
  58. 58. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 58 Element 10 Name: TRY TO BE A TOURIST IN YOUR OWN TOWN – STREET GAME (COMPETITION) Approximate time: From 45 to 60 minutes Number of students: Minimum 6 Type of grouping students: Pair or Group Working Materials needed: Copies of/or maps of the city/town where the activity takes place Description: This activity is designed to take place outside the classroom, in the town/city centre, using authentic/or copies of maps, streets, buildings, objects of the particular place. Its aim is to learn/practice/revise vocabulary and grammar structures connected with asking for/giving directions, asking for/giving information, describing places/objects/buildings. The teacher and students meet in town, the teacher hands in the maps of the town/city centre to the students and explains the rules of the game: 1.Students are divided into groups of 2-3 . 2. Each group gets a map with marked places (2-3) within the proximity of 200-400 metres. Each group has to explain to the other group/groups the way to the marked places by describing/giving the directions to them in such a way so the rest have to get there and check the places/objects without being given the name of the particular place/object. The directions are given from the starting place to the first location, and then from the first location to the second, and – if there is a third location – from the second to the third. The students mark their way on the maps. Each group has different places/objects marked on their maps. 3. They have a time limit (20-30 minutes) depending on the number and distance from the meeting point to the objects. 4. After coming back, they have to describe the places /objects and
  59. 59. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 59 check whether they got to the right ones. 5. The group which found their way to all (or the highest number of places) the marked places on other groups’ maps is the winner. (This activity can be either simplified or modified , depending on the number of students, level of advancement and variety of places to be found). Useful phrases: - How can I/we get to place1/2/3? - Where’s object 1/2/3? - In order to get to place 1/2/3 you must go straight/along the....street, then turn left/right, take the first/second turning left/right. - Go across the.... street/ cross ..... street. - It’ll be on your left/right/opposite you, etc. As a follow-up/homework, students can make/write a dialogue asking for the directions to the most well-known/interesting touristic places/objects in their town. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning X body involvement (expression) X senses involvement X communication sensitivity X communication capability X well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence X socio-cultural competence X pragmatic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods X fine arts X body expressions X historical objects
  60. 60. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 60 -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example available. Example: Students are given the map of the Old Town of Cracow. The red arrow shows the place where they start the game off (the Market Square) and the blue arrow shows one of the marked points/objects that has to be found by other groups (here: University). Students explain the way to the marked places to the others, e.g.: In order to get to Place 1, you must turn right, go past the Cloth Hall, go straight ahead past Wiślna Street, cross Jagiellońska Street and the place you’re looking for will be on your left. (Although they know that Place1 is University, they do not mention the name to the others). And so they proceed with giving directions to other marked places. The groups have to find/locate all the places of the others and after the set time come back with their findings. The winner is the group which found all the places correctly.
  61. 61. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 61 Element 11 Name: QUIZ IN A MUSEUM Approximate time: Minimum. 60 minutes Number of students: Minimum 6 Type of grouping students: Pair or Group Working Materials needed: A quiz (worksheet) compiled in advance, and photocopies of the sheets for the quiz participants If it is a competition among participants, an award is also important. Description: The main aims of the activity include improving communication as well as reading skills, revising and improving vocabulary, and enhancing cooperation in English. The students get some questions the answers to which they can find only if they go and visit an exhibition in a museum. They will have to read descriptions and information leaflets on the artists and the exhibits, scan for relevant information in the descriptions, or simply focus on details of the artefacts, etc. Questions may also focus on some background information that students can find if they do some research on the topic. The language proficiency of the students determines the complexity of the task. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning X senses involvement X communication sensitivity -being
  62. 62. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 62 Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X socio-cultural competence ic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X fine arts X historical objects -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Before going to an exhibition, it is a good idea to discuss some museum-related questions, e.g.  What’s the best museum you’ve ever been to?  What do you like most and least about museums?  What do you think is the best museum in the world?  What exhibitions are on at the moment that you would really like to see? As a follow up, after the visit, a discussion can start which allows students to speak about and share their experiences, develop critical thinking skills, and converse freely on what they have seen in the exhibition, etc. e.g. Students can make connections between their personal experiences and the paintings they have seen. An example of possible questions:  What is the lady in the painting by X is holding in her hands?  When did X paint “....”?  How many landscapes are there in Room X?  What date can you see on the wall of the building?
  63. 63. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 63 Element 12 Name: STRETCHING Approximate time: 10 minutes Number of students: Minimum 5 Type of grouping students: Group Working/ Individual exercise Materials needed: Large space, e.g. a park Description: At the beginning of the lesson or (even better) in the middle of the lesson when the students have been sitting for a long time the teacher can introduce some stretching exercises. The students stand up and follow the teacher's directions. There can be a soft musical background to accompany the exercises. Prolonged sitting has been linked to many health problems and general lack of concentration. Some exercises at your desk every 40-50 minutes can help counteract the ill effects of sitting. Main functions: X attention X body involvement (expression) X communication sensitivity X well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence -cultural competence
  64. 64. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 64 Sources: X memory rules X body expressions literature -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the activity available. Example: STRETCHING EXERCISES 1) Step your right foot forward and place your hands on the right knee. Breathe in and exhale. Return to the first position. Step your left foot forward and place your hands on the left knee. Breathe in and exhale. Repeat four times.. 2) Stand with your feet together and your arms up over your head. Clasp your hands together and breathe in as you reach upward. Move your back and shoulders on the right and breathe out. Repeat in the left side. 3) Bend your knees slightly. Put your hands behind your back. Interlace your fingers. Straighten your arms and stretch them upward. 4) Sit on the floor with your legs straight. Bend your right knee and put your right foot behind your left leg. Put your right hand on the floor. Bend your left elbow and put it against your right knee. With the left elbow push the right knee left. Switch sides. 5) Bend your knees and put the soles of your feet together. Push the knee toward the ground. 6) Lift your right arm and put the right hand behind the neck. Put your left hand on the waist and move it up until it meets the right hand. Interlace the left hand with the right hand. Breathe in and out.
  65. 65. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 65 INVENTING STORIES Element 13 – Folding grid Element 14 - A soup of words - “English stew” Element 15 – Crime story Element 16 - Silent movie Element 17 - Inventing and telling a story using photos/pictures Element 18 - Weaving a story based on headlines
  66. 66. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 66 Element 13 Name: FOLDING GRID Approximate time: 25-40 minutes, depending on the number of students Number of students: Minimum 8 Type of grouping students: Individual and Group Working Materials needed: Paper for notes to write a story; grids Description: The purpose of this activity is to create a story using random names decided by the students. The students are sitting in a circle. The teacher gives each student a grid to fill (there must be as many grids as the students). On the grid there are eight categories to be filled: character1; character2; a place; a time; activity1; activity2; object1; object2. Each student fills in the first empty category of the grid (character1), folds the paper and passes it to the following student (who can’t see what the previous student has written). Now students have to fill the second category (character2) and so on, they will pass the grid until it is complete. When the students have finished filling in the grid they can open the folded sheet and create a story with the words given. When the stories are ready, each student tells his story to the rest of the class. At the end of the activity the class vote on the most original story. The more random the words are, the more original the stories are. This activity encourages students in using their fantasy to connect different words and ideas. Main functions: X cognitive functions X emotional involvement nt (expression) X communication sensitivity
  67. 67. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 67 X communication capability -being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence X socio-cultural competence intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the activity available. Photocopiable material available. Example: CHARACTER 1 Pope Francis CHARACTER 2 A belly dancer A PLACE In the desert
  68. 68. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 68 A TIME New Year’s Eve ACTIVITY 1 Eat egg toasts ACTIVITY 2 Have an injection OBJECT 1 A lipstick OBJECT 2 A pen THE STORY Pope Francis decided to spend New Year’s Eve in a different way. As he didn’t like confusion, parties and fireworks he decided to escape to the desert for a moment of prayer and meditation far from people and civilization. He didn’t have the traditional New Year’s Eve dinner, but he just ate some egg toasts he had taken with him. He was sleeping in his tent when suddenly he woke up with terrible pains. He was feeling dizzy and very sick. He understood that because of the hot temperatures of
  69. 69. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 69 the desert the egg toasts he had eaten had gone spoiled. He had a serious attack of salmonella and nobody could help him. The Pope could hear a strange music coming from outside. He thought it was a hallucination instead he saw a tent with some people who were celebrating with a belly dancer’s show. Among the public there was a doctor who decided to help the Pope recover from his intoxication. The Pope had an injection and felt much better. The belly dancer, who was a fan of the Pope, asked him an autograph but as they didn’t have a pen he used her lipstick!
  70. 70. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 70 Photocopiable material: CHARACTER 1 CHARACTER 2 A PLACE A TIME ACTIVITY 1 ACTIVITY 2 OBJECT 1 OBJECT 2
  71. 71. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 71 Element 14 Name: A SOUP OF WORDS - “ENGLISH STEW” Approximate time: From 15 to 30 minutes Number of students: Minimum 2 Type of grouping students: Individual, Pair or Group Working Materials needed: Colourful slips of paper, pens, scissors, magnets or blue tac Description: This activity can be used to revise vocabulary and/or structures, also can be used as an 'opening the lesson' activity to warm up and to focus on English. The teacher explains that students are going to cook an “English stew”. The teacher gives each student a few (depending on the level of students, more for higher level, less for lower levels) pieces of paper. Teacher asks students to write on the pieces given any words in English they can think of, and gives students the time limit (for example 5 min). The teacher can also decide that the words have to be connected with one topic (garden, sport, cooking etc.) or part of the grammar (nouns, adjectives, verbs etc.). The teacher draws on the board a big pot and collects the pieces of paper with words from students (corrects spelling if necessary) and pins them with magnets to the pot – they are the spices and ingredients of the stew. The word stew is boiling. The teacher can ask students, for example, to memorise as many words as possible in a given time limit, to put them in alphabetical order, to write sentences or short stories with them. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X memory functioning
  72. 72. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 72 X communication sensitivity X communication capability -being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence -cultural competence X pragmatic competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods -theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example available. Example: Photo by Anna Payne © 2015
  73. 73. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 73 Element 15 Name: CRIME STORY Approximate time: From 45 to 90 minutes Number of students: Minimum 2 Type of grouping students: Individual, Pair or Group Working Materials needed: Crime story Description: This activity can be used to learn/practice vocabulary/ grammar/ structures, and to practise reading skills. The teacher is going to present a short crime story Danny. At first the teacher presents the vocabulary that can be a problem for the students and writes the difficult words on the board and explains the meaning. Students need to have a reason to read the story so the teacher asks them to answer some questions (1. Who is Danny? 2. Where is he? 3. Who is he waiting for? 4. Who is his brother? 5. What is his brother doing at the moment? 6. What can Danny hear?). Students read the story and answer the questions. They focus on finding answers for the question and on general understanding of the text. They can compare their answers with other students. Students read the story again and underline the words they don't know. In pairs they try to guess their meaning from the context. They check the meaning with the teacher or on the dictionary. They identify past simple tense in the text. The teacher revises the basic rules of the tense. Students find as many examples of the tense as possible in the time limit (5 minutes). At the end of the lesson the teacher can invite students to a general discussion about crime stories :  Do people like crime stories? Why?  What authors of crime stories do you know? Who is your
  74. 74. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 74 favourite author?  What is your favourite story? Why?  Do you know any famous detectives? Who is your favourite? What is he /she like? For homework the teacher can ask students to write a short (250 words) crime story. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning  body involvement (expression)  senses involvement X communication sensitivity X communication capability  well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence  socio-cultural competence X pragmatic competence  intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods  fine arts  body expressions X literature  music  historical objects  poetry  para-theatrical forms  multi-sensory simulation Comments: Example of the Crime stories available.
  75. 75. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 75 Example: Crime Story (The teacher can decide to use only a part of the story on the lesson and can ask students to finish reading it as the homework) Elementary Danny sat in the car, waiting. He was very nervous. His brother was at the jewellers and now anything could happen. The jewellery shop was quite old and ordinary. It was located on the high street of the town. Danny and his brother were robbers. Danny was not very enthusiastic about the job, but there he was. He had no choice now. His brother was in that shop and there was no way he was going to let him down. Rob, his brother, was six years older than him. He was determined and dangerous. With no real education and no love of learning, Rob could have a very simple, not well paid, job or he could rob and steal. He chose the latter. And when Danny was old enough he joined him. For a long time Danny had looked up to his brother, always seeing him with the girls, having a lot of money, being an important person. They both spent a lot of time living outside the law, in a kind of virtual reality. They lost contact with their mother and old friends. It was very hard for them to find someone they could trust. Danny felt that Rob had lost sight of his conscience, and was taking way more risks than was healthy for him. His brother was getting greedy and it was affecting his judgment. Stealing from shipping containers was one thing, but robbing a jewellers? It’s all a bit oldschool, he thought. And dangerous. Too exposed. Too many cameras on the street and helicopters in the sky to make any getaway easy. Suddenly Danny heard a loud bang, he saw that the glass window of the jewellers exploded into the street. Shocked Danny stared, wide eyed, down the street with horror. What? He was suddenly terrified and sweating. The shop alarm screeched in his ears. In everyone’s ears. Suddenly everyone on the high street was looking, open mouthed, toward the jewellers. His brother opened the door of the jewellers, with the
  76. 76. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 76 shotgun in one hand and a full looking sports bag in the other, and came running down the street towards the car. But Danny did nothing. He didn’t even start the engine. Story by Tim Zambra edited by Anna Payne Intermediate Danny sat in the car, waiting. His nerves were on fire. Gripping the steering wheel tightly with both hands, he stared fiercely down the narrow street trying to stay alert to every possibility. His brother had just entered the jewellers and now anything might happen. A rather old looking shop it was, and as such seemed not so prominent on what was the main drag of the somewhat small town they had driven 60 miles to for this job. Working as a small crew under the watch of a larger crime syndicate, they had had no real choice in the robbery, in the size of it, the location, anything really. He hadn’t exactly been enthusiastic about it, but there it was. He had no choice. His brother was in that shop and there was no way he was going to let him down, not now. Not now it was all happening. The time to have backed out was long past. Rob, his brother, six years older than him, had been up to no good all his life. With no real education and no love of learning, to say the least, Rob had been confronted with a life of low wages and the kinds of jobs that no one really wants, or a life with his ‘friends’, robbing and stealing anything that wasn’t nailed down. He chose the latter. And when Danny was old enough not to care what his mother thought of him anymore, so too did he. For a long time Danny had idolised his brother, always seeing him with the girls, spending money, older, tougher guys in the community seeming to treat him with importance, but that way of seeing things had gradually changed over time and had given way to suspicions and paranoia. So much time spent living outside the law had put them both into a kind of virtual reality that had created distance not only between him and his mother, but also with old friends. Having girlfriends had become difficult too. What and how much to tell them about his life, always a hidden fear that they might grass him up to save themselves if things went south and the law became involved. All his dreams of freedom, of living as an outlaw, just seemed more complicated now than they were exciting. But that he didn’t trust his brother’s judgment anymore was the most pressing concern.
  77. 77. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 77 Rob had lost sight of his conscience, Danny felt, and was taking way more risks than was healthy for him. Like the guy who had put them up for this jewellers job. A total psychopath, Danny thought, and he was amazed that his brother didn’t see it. His brother was getting greedy and it was affecting his judgment. Knocking off shipping containers was one thing, but robbing a jewellers? It’s all a bit oldschool, he thought. And dangerous. Too exposed. Too many cameras on the street and helicopters in the sky to make any getaway easy. With a percussive strike that hit his chest, the glass window of the jewellers exploded outwardly, suddenly, into the street. Shocked from his thoughts, his body rushing with adrenaline, Danny stared, wide eyed, down the street with horror. What? His mind raced with acute anxiety. The shop alarm screeched in his ears. In everyone’s ears. Suddenly everyone on the street was looking, open mouthed, towards the jewellers. And for a short while it felt to Danny as though he were sitting in the very centre of a whirlwind. Though his heart was racing, his mind seemed strangely detached from the scene in front of him, like he was dreaming and it was all happening to someone else. And then, as though a video had been running slowly but had then stuttered back to normal speed, his brother slammed open the door of the jewellers, the sawn-off shotgun in one hand and a full looking sports bag in the other, and came pelting down the street towards the car. But Danny did nothing. He didn’t even start the engine. By Tim Zambra
  78. 78. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 78 Element 16 Name: SILENT MOVIE Approximate time: 30-35 minutes (depending on the length of the chosen film episode + the level of proficiency of the learners) Number of students: Minimum 6 Type of grouping students: Pair or Group Working Materials needed: Excerpts from films, interviews, etc. downloaded from the Internet or from DVDs Description: Episodes of films, interviews, etc. provide enjoyable language learning opportunities for students if the teacher chooses episodes which are purposeful and tailored to students’ learning needs and proficiency level. This activity can be used at any stage of the lesson, serving as a warm-up, introducing new vocabulary/grammar, revising vocabulary/grammar, or summing up the lesson. It can also be the basis of a whole conversation class with a long discussion. The primary aims of the activity are to make students speak and enhance discussion. The teacher presents a short film episode without voices. Students have to guess what is going on, what the situation can be, what the relationship between the characters is, where the situation takes place, what the characters are saying, etc. Students can invent the story in pairs or in groups. Once students have their own story, they can tell it to the other students, and can even act it out. Others are encouraged to ask questions. As a final step, the original version is shown. Main functions: X cognitive functions X attention X emotional involvement X memory functioning X body involvement (expression) X senses involvement
  79. 79. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 79 X communication sensitivity X communication capability  well-being Key competences: X linguistic or grammatical competence X discourse competence X socio-cultural competence X pragmatic competence X intercultural competence Sources: X memory rules X memory methods  fine arts X body expressions X literature  music  historical objects  poetry X para-theatrical forms X multi-sensory simulation Comments: As a follow up, a discussion can start which allows students to explore relevant issues raised from a variety of perspectives, develop critical thinking skills, elicit responses, converse freely on all aspects of the episode, etc.

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