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GBSS' Jane Plumb @ MRF's Meningitis & Septicaemia in Children & Adults 2017

GBSS' Jane Plumb @ MRF's Meningitis & Septicaemia in Children & Adults 2017

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Early-onset Group B Streptococcal Disease - Insights from affected families

https://www.meningitis.org/mrf-conference-2017

Early-onset Group B Streptococcal Disease - Insights from affected families

https://www.meningitis.org/mrf-conference-2017

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GBSS' Jane Plumb @ MRF's Meningitis & Septicaemia in Children & Adults 2017

  1. 1. Presented by: Jane Plumb MBE Group B Strep Support jplumb@gbss.org.uk / 01444 416176
  2. 2. UK charity, founded 1996 Dedicated to eradicating GBS infection in babies Provides up-to-date evidence-based info to families & health professionals Supports affected families Expert medical advisory panel
  3. 3. Explore the health, social and other issues faced by affected families during their baby’s EOGBS afterwards, including subsequent pregnancies
  4. 4. Online survey (n=930): parents/carers of EOGBS babies Participants asked about: • awareness of antenatal GBS carriage status • IV antibiotics in labour • clinical presentation of baby’s EOGBS • longer-term health, social & other consequences of
  5. 5. 74% of babies first unwell aged <12 hours 15% aged 12-24 hours 5% aged 2 days 3% aged 3 days
  6. 6. 68% made a full recovery 24% recovered with long-term health consequences 40% substantial 8% died
  7. 7. 76% of surviving babies were in hospital for 7+ days
  8. 8.  89% respondents (n=752) reported practical or financial difficulties during baby’s hospital stay
  9. 9.  30% reported that siblings experienced difficulties as a result of their sibling’s EOGBS  24% reported resultant financial difficulty
  10. 10. Insight into what families may be experiencing during EOGBS and afterwards, including subsequent pregnancies Most parents of a EOGBS baby experienced difficulties during baby’s inpatient care Long-term issues remain for many families, even when EOGBS babies make a full recovery Need for health professionals to reflect on the care, support and information these families may need

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