Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

1 native know how for internet

Native Know-How is a free PowerPoint slide show for individual reading or public presentations. It encourages land use which protects the environment and wildlife habitat. Th

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

1 native know how for internet

  1. 1. Where Today in my town not one bird did I see and gone is Mom’s last flowering dogwood tree. Where gentle bumblebees once buzzed in my plants mounds now grow with fierce red fire ants. Purple Martins no longer fly over my head dragonflies, fireflies, and toads have all fled. Can I bring these all back, at least on my land? a home where nature’s creations will stand?
  2. 2. Traditional Landscaping PLANTS lawns and non-native species DESIGN/STYLE formal uniform unchanged from season to season UPKEEP High maintenance required for a manicured look What are this house’s best land features? neat, open, Photo from Creative Commons What would improve its appearance, usefulness, purpose? Is this style good for the environment? Should it be? Can gardeners make a significant difference to preserve the ecosystem?
  3. 3. It avoids or mitigatess habitat/wildlife loss: replacing forests with cities and prairies with farmland pollution of groundwater and soil pesticides to kill weeds and insects electro-smog: microwave radiation from cell phone towers search results environmental impact
  4. 4. way too much mulch
  5. 5. Partridge Pea and Firebush Maypop Hill’s Prairie & Bee Pasture One mowing in January/no burn (to protect bees and insects in the soil and leaf litter) Outdoor seating hay bale garden annual veggies Safe shade Pond Dog Yard and Orchard House with back porch garden Pollinator Plants Hugulkultur Pots Permaculture
  6. 6. Native Food Forest
  7. 7. Download free pdf publications from state universities Blight-resistant Kieffer pear and Jerusalem Artichoke flower
  8. 8. Native Mints
  9. 9. Late winter - early spring Butterweed (Senecio species), Black Cherry, Cherry Laurel, Cottonwood, Crabapple, Mayhaw, Red Maple, Wild Plums, Wild Strawberry Spring - Early Summer Buttonbush, Black Gum, Blueberry, Blackberry, Elderberry, Native Mints (Beebalm, Bergamot, Horsemint), Iris, Coneflowers, Gallberry Holly. Golden Alexander, Milkweeds, Salvias, Sourwood, Thistles, Tickseed (Coreopsis) Titi (Cyrilla), Viburnums Summer - Fall Asters, Black-eyed Susan, Liatris, Boneset, Ironweed, Goldenrod,Joe-Pye Weed, Blue Lobelia, Groundsel, Sunflowers, Lespedeza (Bush Clover) Find seeds or plants to grow year-round habitat for the 3 B’s: birds, butterflies, bees
  10. 10. Collect and organize information notebook, photos, computer files garden journal
  11. 11. Sources of information– books, internet (Dirt Doctor) State and Local Native Plant Societies Sources of inspiration State Dept. of Wildlife & Fisheries State Parks, Wildlife Management Areas. Local Conservation Areas State and Local Native Plant Societies Online nurseries and free catalogs
  12. 12. BONAP's North American Plant Atlas (NAPA)
  13. 13. Know mature sizes of plants Keep plants and mulch from touching house Reconsider foundation plantings which can cause issues. Distance from building: • Large trees (>25 – 50 –100 ft.) • Medium trees (>20 ft.) • Small trees (15 ft.) • Shrubs, other plants (3 ft.) Wildlife habitat? Nonvenomous King snakes kill cottonmouths, other venomous snakes
  14. 14. Native Wildlife Needs Native Plants Click here to see the top 10 plants which support hundreds of wildlife species
  15. 15. Black Gum Ironwood Live Oak SabalPalm /Cabbage Palm Some Oaks: Cow Oak Shumard Oak Wax Myrtle Winged Elm American Elm Holly: American, Dahoon, Savannah American Hop Hornbeam Black Locust Catalpa Cherry Laurel Green Ash Hackberry Some Oaks: Cherrybark , Nuttall , Willow Oak Pond Cypress River Birch Southern Magnolia Sweet Bay Magnolia Sycamore Maple Box Elder Hickory/Pecan Red Cedar Pine (Longleaf Pine most resistant) Tulip Poplar Some Oaks Cottonwood
  16. 16. Native Viburnums 6 - 15’ (some are small trees); large flower clusters attract butterflies; colorful fruit attracts birds white flowers in spring; reddish fall foliage
  17. 17. companions Attract Pollinators (bees, butterflies, wasps, etc.) Repel Pests (fleas, flies, mosquitoes, beetles, etc.) Attract Predatory Insects (parasitic wasps, lacewings, assassin bugs, etc.)
  18. 18. Fall provides many wildflowers for gardens and forage for bees
  19. 19. Crushed leaves repel biting insects
  20. 20. Native bees, wasps, gnats, mosquitoes, are essential for pollination and to feed birds
  21. 21. Soil nutrients? depleted pH? Low calcium = very low Moisture? well-drained
  22. 22. micro-irrigation
  23. 23. Chinese Privet Ligustrum sinense JapanesClimbing Fern Phyllanthus urinaria
  24. 24. Creative Commons Summary Goals: native plants, edibles, shade, pollinators Design: to match your soil, conditions Stewardship: know your real pests use nature-friendly methods
  25. 25. Public Domain: USDA
  26. 26. Introduction …………………………………………………………..................................……2 Gardening by Guessing …….......……………………………………………………….…......3 Natural Landscaping with Native Plants …………………………………………….……..4 Chapter 1: Planning for Natural Land Use Wish List, Ideas, Inspiration, Sources of Native Plants …………………………….…...... 5, 6 Site Planning, Sample Site Map, Alternatives to Foundation Plantings ………….…. 7-9 Landscaping Ideas, Pointers, Low Maintenance …………………………..…...10, 11 Lawn and Alternatives …………………………………………………….…..…12 Chapter 2: Land Use Design Ideas Ecosystem Gardening, Edible Forest Gardens …………………………………….....…13, 14 Native Plants for Medicinal Gardens ………………………………………………...…15 Native Plants That Repel Pests, Small Trees for Safe Shade, Homesteading….....16-18 Chapter 3: Practical Matters Sustainable Practices, Choosing Plants, Planting Basics, Fertilizers, Composting….......19-25 Soil pH, Crop Rotation, Fruits and Nuts ………………………………….……....…26-30 Companion Plants/Insectary …………………………………………….….…..….…31 Herbs and Native Plants in Companion Plantings ……………………..…...….32-36 Organic Solutions: Weeds, Plant Diseases, Insect Pests, Big Pests ….….....37-40 Chapter 4: Attracting Wildlife. Birds, Creating a Bird-Friendly Habitat, Hummingbirds …………………….....…..41-43 Butterflies, Bees, Nectar Plants for Pollinators ………………………………...…44-46 Roadside Maintenance that puts nature first ………………………………....…47-48 Chapter 5: Native Plants for the South Trees, Shrubs, Ground Covers, Vines, Grasses & Grasslike Plants, Water Plants…...…. 49-67 Chapter 6: Flowers and Seasonal Interest Late Winter/Early Spring, Spring/Early Summer, Summer/Fall ………………....…..68-84 Chapter 7: Monthly Calendar January – April …………………………………………………………………..…………..84 May – December ………………………………………………………………..…………85 Chapter 8: Glossary of Important Terms, Facts, & Other.Useful.Information.………..........86-94 Additional Resources……………………………....……………………………...…................94 A leaf well spent………………………………………………………….……….................…95 Index……………………………………………………......………………………….…..96-107 http://www.amazon.com/dp/1654657514 Wildlife Corridors and Pretty Ditches Yikes!  The things some people do for a perception of neatness! Surely the untrained employee who sprayed herbicide here does not consider this area beautiful. or healthy. Federal, state, and local agencies have policies which recommend schedules for mowing roadsides, cleaning ditches, and dealing with various issues of water drainage and safety. These policies are available to read online. In some cases, botanists and biologists may be consulted for their recommendations, but do maintenance crews follow guidelines? The average roadside is very often reduced to the appearance of a putting green or an ugly dead zone, as we see in the image above. Notice how some plants have developed resistance to the herbicides. But not all southern roadsides are shaved. poisoned, and denatured to this execrable degree. The roadside, below, in Washington Parish, Louisiana, shows us how it is possible to maintain roadsides while providing a pretty view for drivers to enjoy. Even there, notice the bare spots of ground where mowing too low (more than around 6 inches) has impacted roots of grasses, possibly leading to erosion on slopes. An excellent resource that states and local agencies could use to preserve nature while achieving basic goals is this handbook from The Xerces Society: Roadside Best Management Practices that Benefit Pollinators; Handbook for Supporting Pollinators through Roadside Maintenance and Landscape Design SHRUBS, 1-10 feet Shrubs come in so many sizes and shapes that they fit just about anywhere. They are useful in perennial beds as individual specimens or as foundations around which flowering plants bloom and fade with the seasons. While they can be pruned for hedges and to keep them from growing too tall, species and varieties should be chosen to avoid frequent trimming. Evergreen/Semi-evergreen Blueberry/Huckleberry – grown as ornamentals and for colorful fall foliage and fruit which attracts birds; require acid soils •Baygall Blueberry, Vaccinium fuscatum, 4-9’; S-PS; A W; dark pink flowers in late winter; dark berries in summer •Dwarf Blueberry, Vaccinium darrowii, Vaccinium myrsinites--which is native to other Southeastern states, 1-2’; S-PS; A W,; small leaves, edible black berries •Dwarf Huckleberry, Gaylussacia dumosa, ½-2’; S-PS; B; W; glossy leaves, large dark berries Bush Honeysuckle, Diervilla sessilifolia, 3-5’; S-PS; B (special value to bumblebees); small yellow flowers in summer; best in dry sunny sites; also see Diervilla lonicera for upper South Coastal Doghobble/Coast Leucothoe, Leucothoe axillaris, 3-6'; PS-Sh; leathery leaves; white available at

×