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M A R Í A G O I C O E C H E A M A R K C . M A R I N O
U N I V E R S I T Y C O M P L U T E N S E O F M A D R I D U N I V E ...
ELO 2017 (Dec.1; July 19-22, 2017)
Children interactive narratives
Playing interactive
narratives
Rereading
print
Free interactivity
Variation
Exploration an...
The Habit of Rereading
Repetition allows children to:
• internalize story patterns
• solve linguistic and cognitive puzzle...
Piaget’s child development theories
Child’s cognitive evolution:
From the concrete
To the schematic
To the symbolic
What we mean by transition
Not transition
as developmental stage
What we mean by transition
Transition as
intermediary state
the in-between
Capturing the Dynamic
Snapshot as transcript
Winnicott’s Transitional Object
“When symbolism is employed the infant is already clearly
distinguishing between fantasy a...
George Poulet’s Phenomenology of Reading
 “[T]he extraordinary fact in the case of a book is the falling away of
the barr...
Gabrielle Schwab’s Stages of Reading
 Schwab: our internalized patterns of reacting to otherness
will influence our readi...
Transcripts & Traversals
The transcript, what Nick Montfort has called a traversal, collects
what has happened when the in...
Transcripts in Games
Historical Precedent:
 ELIZA (1966)
 Colossal Cave Adventure (1976)
 Infocom Games (1979-1989, RIP...
Mrs. Wobbles & the Tangerine House
Other Transcripts
Tell me that story again
Tell me that story again
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Tell me that story again

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Paper by Maria Goicoechea and Mark Marino for ICIDS 2016 on the use of transcripts in E-lit for children.

Published in: Education
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Tell me that story again

  1. 1. M A R Í A G O I C O E C H E A M A R K C . M A R I N O U N I V E R S I T Y C O M P L U T E N S E O F M A D R I D U N I V E R S I T Y O F S O U T H E R N C A L I F O R N I A Can You Read Me That Story Again? The Role of the Transcript as Transitional Object in Interactive Storytelling for Children
  2. 2. ELO 2017 (Dec.1; July 19-22, 2017)
  3. 3. Children interactive narratives Playing interactive narratives Rereading print Free interactivity Variation Exploration and participation Making choices Dynamic Emergent Guidance Repetition Reviewing and remembering Confirmation of their expectations Static Determined Disorientation Familiarity
  4. 4. The Habit of Rereading Repetition allows children to: • internalize story patterns • solve linguistic and cognitive puzzles • reinforce their understanding of the story as well as their cognitive development • recognize details they may have missed in previous readings • fortify their memory • connect virtual world of the book with their life experiences
  5. 5. Piaget’s child development theories Child’s cognitive evolution: From the concrete To the schematic To the symbolic
  6. 6. What we mean by transition Not transition as developmental stage
  7. 7. What we mean by transition Transition as intermediary state the in-between
  8. 8. Capturing the Dynamic Snapshot as transcript
  9. 9. Winnicott’s Transitional Object “When symbolism is employed the infant is already clearly distinguishing between fantasy and fact, between inner objects and external objects, between primary creativity and perception. But the term transitional object, according to my suggestion, gives room for the process of becoming able to accept difference and similarity. I think there is use for a term for the root of symbolism in time, a term that describes the infant's journey from the purely subjective to objectivity; and it seems to me that the transitional object (piece of blanket, etc.) is what we see of this journey of progress towards experiencing.” (Donald Woods Winnicott:“Transitional Objects and Transitional Phenomena—A Study of the First Not-Me Possession”, 1953)
  10. 10. George Poulet’s Phenomenology of Reading  “[T]he extraordinary fact in the case of a book is the falling away of the barriers between you and it. You are inside it; it is inside you; there is no longer either outside or inside” (Georges Poulet: “Criticism and the Experience of Interiority”, 1980)
  11. 11. Gabrielle Schwab’s Stages of Reading  Schwab: our internalized patterns of reacting to otherness will influence our reading habits. 1. Introjection Immersive reading, complete fusion with the virtual world 2. Rejection Refusal to accept the contents of the book 3. Projection Not seeing the story due to your own prejudices 4. Reflexivity Self-aware acceptance of the book, even with an acknowledgement of your own prejudices
  12. 12. Transcripts & Traversals The transcript, what Nick Montfort has called a traversal, collects what has happened when the interactor “completes” a work of Interactive Fiction by going from the beginning until no more can be narrated, and thus it provides an equivalent sensation to having read the whole book. (Nick Monfort. Twisty Little Passages: An Approach to Interactive Fiction. MIT, p. 24. 2005)
  13. 13. Transcripts in Games Historical Precedent:  ELIZA (1966)  Colossal Cave Adventure (1976)  Infocom Games (1979-1989, RIP)  Façade (2005) Contemporary Interactive Fiction Systems:  TADS 3  Inform 7  Undum  Inklewriter
  14. 14. Mrs. Wobbles & the Tangerine House
  15. 15. Other Transcripts

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