<ul><li>Citizen Engagement & Policy Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Forming, storming, norming and performing </li></ul>Public ...
Is there an Australian political culture? <ul><li>In the Dixonian tradition, political stability is achieved by ‘self-rest...
Is there an Australian political culture? <ul><li>In the 1970s, Australians were viewed as ‘not much interested in politic...
Is there an Australian political culture? <ul><li>‘ National opinion polls tell us that public trust in Australia’s govern...
Why is the political culture important? <ul><li>As we move to a technology-driven, more open society: </li></ul><ul><li>‘ ...
Some Observations <ul><li>An underlying Australian civic culture which raises some important questions: </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Policy Learning <ul><li>In its broadest meaning, to borrow from Howlett & Ramesh (2003: 220): </li></ul><ul><li>Policy lea...
What will be our approach to ‘Netiquette’? <ul><li>In light of our ‘civic culture’, what is our capacity to ‘learn’ throug...
Understanding new media ‘policy learning’ <ul><li>Forming:  ‘Public Sphere’, Open Forum, ABC </li></ul><ul><li>Storming:  ...
One step away from politics? <ul><li>Specialist online policy research centres </li></ul><ul><li>We need decentralised spa...
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Public Sphere 2 - Gov 2.0

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Presentation at Kate Lundy's 'Public Sphere #2: Gov 2.0', Parliament House, Canberra, 22 June 2009.

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Public Sphere 2 - Gov 2.0

  1. 1. <ul><li>Citizen Engagement & Policy Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Forming, storming, norming and performing </li></ul>Public Sphere #2: Government 2.0
  2. 2. Is there an Australian political culture? <ul><li>In the Dixonian tradition, political stability is achieved by ‘self-restraint in the interests of constitutionalism… when “reinforced by an informed and vigilant citizenry”’ (Saunders & Le Roy 2003: 9; De Percy 2004: 9) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Is there an Australian political culture? <ul><li>In the 1970s, Australians were viewed as ‘not much interested in politics and displayed low rates of political participation’. </li></ul><ul><li>However: ‘One cannot be sure if that Australia has yet acquired a demonstrably civic culture’ </li></ul><ul><li>(Emy & Hughes 1993: 122) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Is there an Australian political culture? <ul><li>‘ National opinion polls tell us that public trust in Australia’s governments and our political leadership is now at an all-time low’. </li></ul><ul><li>(Uhr 2005) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Why is the political culture important? <ul><li>As we move to a technology-driven, more open society: </li></ul><ul><li>‘ [T]he operation and viability of any given political system depends also on the political culture which underlies it’ (Emy & Hughes 1993: 113) </li></ul><ul><li>Which leads me to some observations about an emerging online Australian ‘civic culture’ </li></ul>
  6. 6. Some Observations <ul><li>An underlying Australian civic culture which raises some important questions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are Australians averse to conflict, generally? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does Australia really have a democratic political culture? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Explosion of conflict on educational, community and media participatory forums </li></ul><ul><li>Tendency for ‘knee-jerk’ reactions from authorities </li></ul>
  7. 7. Policy Learning <ul><li>In its broadest meaning, to borrow from Howlett & Ramesh (2003: 220): </li></ul><ul><li>Policy learning ‘includes both the intended and unintended… consequences of policy-making activities’ and is ‘an iterative process of active learning on the part of policy actors’ </li></ul><ul><li>Learning (and conflict) will become more intense as the number of actors increases </li></ul>
  8. 8. What will be our approach to ‘Netiquette’? <ul><li>In light of our ‘civic culture’, what is our capacity to ‘learn’ through a process which essentially involves ‘conflict’? </li></ul>
  9. 9. Understanding new media ‘policy learning’ <ul><li>Forming: ‘Public Sphere’, Open Forum, ABC </li></ul><ul><li>Storming: Follow up debates, research, reactions </li></ul><ul><li>Norming: Establishing the ‘rules of the game’ </li></ul><ul><li>Performing: Obtaining the benefits </li></ul>
  10. 10. One step away from politics? <ul><li>Specialist online policy research centres </li></ul><ul><li>We need decentralised spaces to experiment </li></ul><ul><li>Emerging models: </li></ul><ul><li>Outsourcing citizen engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Education will play a primary role </li></ul><ul><li>Many barriers to the legitimacy of social media </li></ul>

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