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Exploring the links between staffwellbeing and patients’ experiencesof careProfessor Jill Maben, Director National Nursing...
Final report...• Patients experiences  of care and the  influence of staff  motivation, affect and  wellbeing.   NIHR Serv...
Four organisations... 8 case studies                              ‘Low’ performing          ‘High’ performing             ...
Key findings• There is a relationship between staff wellbeing and (a) staff-reported  patient care performance and (b) pat...
Staff and patient variables5.04.5                                                             Org climate                 ...
The inherent demands of care work    in caring for older people with            complex needsNational Nursing Research Uni...
Contextual factors shapingstaff experience• Demanding work: high-demand work  with little control• A family at work: local...
High demand - low control work• Inadequate or unpredictable  staffing levels.• The movement of staff at short  notice into...
A family at work: local work climate                                                        • Ward leadership             ...
Fissures in co-worker relationships…• Qualified staff (registered nurses) and  unqualified staff (HCAs)• Staff from differ...
“Poppets and Parcels....”• Staff talked of  ‘Poppets’ – favoured  patients- a term of  affection for a  sweetheart• Less f...
Challenging a few care quality myths• “A smile costs  nothing”• “It’s not about nurse  staffing”• “It’s not rocket  scienc...
Thank you  jill.maben@kcl.ac.uk   SDO Funding Acknowledgement:   This project was funded by the National Institute for Hea...
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Jill Maben: Exploring the links between staff wellbeing and patients' experience of care

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Jill Maben, Director of the National Nursing Research Unit at King’s College London, highlights the findings of her recent study into the relationship between staff wellbeing and patient experience.

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Jill Maben: Exploring the links between staff wellbeing and patients' experience of care

  1. 1. Exploring the links between staffwellbeing and patients’ experiencesof careProfessor Jill Maben, Director National Nursing Research UnitKings College LondonWith thanks to Glenn Robert; Mary Adams, Riccardo Peccei & Trevor MurrellsFunded by the National Institute of Health Research: Service Delivery and Organisation The Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery at King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  2. 2. Final report...• Patients experiences of care and the influence of staff motivation, affect and wellbeing. NIHR Service Delivery and Organisation programme 2012.National Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  3. 3. Four organisations... 8 case studies ‘Low’ performing ‘High’ performing microsystem microsystemOakfield Emergency Maternity(acute) admissions unitElmwick Elderly care Haemato-oncology(acute)Ashcroft Adult community Community matron(community) nursing service (ACNS) service (CMS)Larchmere Rapid response team District community(community) (RRT) nursing service (DNS)National Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  4. 4. Key findings• There is a relationship between staff wellbeing and (a) staff-reported patient care performance and (b) patient-reported patient experience. Staff wellbeing is an important antecedent of patient care performance.• Seven staff variables (“wellbeing bundles”) correlate positively with patient-reported patient experience: • local/work-group climate • co-worker support • job satisfaction • organisational climate • perceived organisational support • low emotional exhaustion, and • supervisor supportNational Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  5. 5. Staff and patient variables5.04.5 Org climate Local/WG climate4.0 Job satisfaction Emot Exhaust rev Pos Org Sup3.5 Supervisor sup Coworker sup Picker index std3.0 Picker overall Picker recommend std PEECH std2.5National Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  6. 6. The inherent demands of care work in caring for older people with complex needsNational Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  7. 7. Contextual factors shapingstaff experience• Demanding work: high-demand work with little control• A family at work: local work climateNational Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  8. 8. High demand - low control work• Inadequate or unpredictable staffing levels.• The movement of staff at short notice into other staff depleted service areas.• The felt lack or inadequacy of training in specialist care skills (e.g. dementia and delirium) for nursing staff. National Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  9. 9. A family at work: local work climate • Ward leadership • Co-worker relationshipsNational Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  10. 10. Fissures in co-worker relationships…• Qualified staff (registered nurses) and unqualified staff (HCAs)• Staff from different cultural or ethnic backgrounds• Staff who practiced or experienced incivility and bullyingNational Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  11. 11. “Poppets and Parcels....”• Staff talked of ‘Poppets’ – favoured patients- a term of affection for a sweetheart• Less favoured patients felt like ‘Parcels’ National Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  12. 12. Challenging a few care quality myths• “A smile costs nothing”• “It’s not about nurse staffing”• “It’s not rocket science”National Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru
  13. 13. Thank you jill.maben@kcl.ac.uk SDO Funding Acknowledgement: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Service Delivery and Organisation programme (project number SDO/213/2008). Department of Health Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed therein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NIHR SDO programme or the Department of HealthNational Nursing Research Unit, King’s College London www.kcl.ac.uk/nursing/nnru

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