Focus on the FutureUSM Board of Trustees‘ Retreat
Looking BackToday‘s ConditionsFocus on the FutureOverview
History & BackgroundIt is wisdom to pause,to look back and seeby what straight ortwisting paths we havearrived at the plac...
History & BackgroundFiscal Years 2000-200502,000,0004,000,0006,000,0008,000,00010,000,00012,000,00014,000,0002000 2001 200...
FOCUS
2006 Strategic PlanA new focus:Health Sciences and Fiscal Stability
Health Sciences2006 Strategic Plan
2006 Strategic PlanNursing ProgramsTraditional on-campus BSNRN-to-BSNAccelerated BSNMSNHealth Sciences
2006 Strategic PlanHealth Sciences050100150200250Fall 09 Fall 10 Fall 11 Fall 12RN-to-BSNPre-nursingAccel. BSNUG NursingNu...
2006 Strategic PlanStefani Doctor of Physical TherapyDirector Mark Horacekhired in August 2009Health SciencesProgram grant...
2006 Strategic PlanDPT Program EnrollmentHealth Sciences020406080100120SU 12 SU 13 SU 14ProjectedProjected
2006 Strategic PlanHealth Information Management (HIM)Director Don Kellogg hired inMarch 2012In accreditation candidacy st...
2006 Strategic PlanHIM Program EnrollmentHealth Sciences02468101214161820Fall 12 Fall 13 Fall 14ProjectedProjected
2006 Strategic PlanTotal Health Sciences EnrollmentHealth Sciences050100150200250300350Fall 09 Fall 10 Fall 11 Fall 12RN-t...
2006 Strategic PlanGrowth in Related Science ProgramsBiology is now the second mostpopular major at USM, behind onlynursin...
Fiscal Stability2006 Strategic Plan
2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityOperating Results (FYE 2006-2013)02,000,0004,000,0006,000,0008,000,00010,000,00012,000,...
2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityUndergraduate Main Campus Enrollment Growth0501001502002503003504004505005502005 2006 2...
2006 Strategic PlanTotal EnrollmentFiscal Stability01002003004005006007008009001,0001,1001,2002005 2006 2007 2008 2009 201...
2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityOther New ProgramsCheer & Dance – Nearly 20 new studentsCross Country/Track & Field – O...
2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityOnline Programs Enrollment050100150200250300350400Fall 09 Fall 10 Fall 11 Fall 12 Fall ...
2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityFall 2012 Enrollment Populations57315115011616237FT UndergraduatePT UndergraduateOnline...
2006 Strategic PlanFiscal Stability01,000,0002,000,0003,000,0004,000,0005,000,0006,000,0007,000,0008,000,0009,000,00010,00...
2006 Strategic PlanImproved FacilitiesMcGilley Field House Berkel Residence HallNew Construction
2006 Strategic PlanImproved FacilitiesRenovationsMead HallNursingStudent ServicesBerchmans HallHealth Sciences
REFOCUS
2011 Strategic PlanHealth SciencesImproved RetentionFacilities and Technology Infrastructure
2011 Strategic PlanImproved RetentionImproving Retention RatesFirst-time Full-time FreshmenFall 2011 – 52%Fall 2012 – 65%F...
2011 Strategic PlanImproved RetentionAthletes‘ GPAAthletes with aGPA above 3.0Fall 2010: 50%Fall 2012: 61%Athletes with aG...
2011 Strategic PlanFacilities and Technology InfrastructureBerchmans as Health Sciences HeadquartersUtilizing ‗The Cloud‘C...
FOCUSonTODAY
Current EnvironmentMassive Open Online CoursesMOOCs
MOOCsWhat are they?New web-based tools/ ―platforms‖What distinguishes them from traditional classesand makes them attracti...
MOOCsFour Comments on Those Observations1. The originators are not accrediting their own courses2. The originators were in...
MOOCsThree Explanatory Notes1. Most are asynchronous2. A few are moving in a synchronous direction3. Completion rate at 5%...
MOOCsWho Are They?CourseraedXUdacity
MOOCsThe Promise and the Apparent Reality of MOOCsMOOCs will transform teaching and learning―The revolution is not about I...
MOOCsThe Promise and the Apparent Reality of MOOCsAlthough still a ―moving target‖ and not fullymatured, MOOCs are not pro...
MOOCsWho Are the Biggest Users of MOOCs?People living outside the USAmong US students:– Non-traditional students• Not enro...
MOOCsWhat Schools are Most Likely to be Affected, If Any?Potentially most affected: small, marginal, independent collegesL...
MOOCsSome Unresolved IssuesWhere do MOOCs appear to be heading?Political pressure to expand educational opportunities andc...
MOOCsOther ConsiderationsEmployer ResponsesAccreditorsState Authorization
MOOCsMOOCs May Already Be Yesterday‘s NewsA note on competency-based learningWhat is it?What are its potential advantages?...
MOOCsRecommended Resources―What you need to know about MOOCs‖ on the Chronicle ofHigher Education websitehttp://chronicle....
Current EnvironmentStudent LoanBubble PuttingHundreds ofColleges at Risk— Business Insider | August 2012Colleges take extr...
Strategic EnrollmentTraditional Enrollment PlanningAnnual ScopeFocus on the Admissions DepartmentAdministrationAthleticsAd...
Strategic EnrollmentFiscalPlanEnrollmentPlanResearchPlanFacilitiesPlanTechnologyPlanFundraisingPlanAcademicPlanStudent Aff...
Strategic EnrollmentWelcome Rob Baird
The Imperative of Strategic EnrollmentPlanningRob BairdSenior Vice President and Principal
Why Plan?
What will be necessary to change in ourenrollment processes, priorities andsystems to achieve our enrollment goalsand resp...
 Increasing enrollment? Improving gross and net revenue? Filling under enrolled programs? Improving geographical repre...
My institution has a written, long-range strategic enrollment planPercent of respondents in agreementType of institution Y...
Nearly 40 years; 60+ consultants; 500 yearsexperience; 2,700 campuses served
Noel-Levitz Partnership Funnel
Understanding thechanging landscape
Six megatrends facing higher educationEnrollment growthwill slowDemographic shiftsRetention andcompletion pressureswill in...
Higher education’s compounded annualgrowth rates is expected to drop by 39 percentfrom 1.8 to 1.1 percent5.6% 1.1%1963-198...
We are at the beginning of a long slump forfuture freshman classes4,200,0004,300,0004,400,0004,500,0004,600,0002008 2010 2...
$75,486$68,961$39,538 $38,500$0$10,000$20,000$30,000$40,000$50,000$60,000$70,000$80,000Asian White Hispanic AfricanAmerica...
Projected percentage change in the number ofpublic high school graduates, by state:School years 2007-08 through 2020-21Sou...
† In-state institutions receiving thelargest number of in-statefreshmen.†† Competition factor equalscollege continuation r...
† In-state institutions receiving thelargest number of in-statefreshmen.†† Competition factor equalscollege continuation r...
† In-state institutions receiving thelargest number of in-statefreshmen.†† Competition factor equalscollege continuation r...
† In-state institutions receiving thelargest number of in-statefreshmen.†† Competition factor equalscollege continuation r...
• 60 percent of all four-year institutions wantlarger freshman classes• 56 percent of all four-year colleges wantbetter fr...
Miles from home4.8%6.2%26.3%17.4%31.4%14.0%0.0%5.0%10.0%15.0%20.0%25.0%30.0%35.0%5 or less 6 to 10 11 to 50 51 to 100 101 ...
Percentage of students satisfied orvery satisfied with theiroverall experience© 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2011 National Studen...
College choice trends
Importance factorsin the decision to enroll
Four-year private enrollmentfactorsItem 2009-10ImportancePercentage1994-95ImportancePercentageShiftFinancial aid 81.0% 75....
What content matters most to themat this point?1. A list of academic programs or degrees2. Cost/tuition/fees3. Academic pr...
Impact of the economic crisis on studentcollege planning• 46% report that the current economic crisis has causedthem to re...
What is the highest academic degree youintend to obtain?1.0% 0.1% 0.4%21.4%42.0%19.1%10.2%4.2%0.2% 1.3%0.0%5.0%10.0%15.0%2...
Number of other colleges applied to foradmission this year12.2%8.8%11.7%14.7%13.3%10.5%7.9%16.4%4.6%0.0%2.0%4.0%6.0%8.0%10...
The college attended is the student’s…57.9%27.0%9.7%5.5%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%50.0%60.0%70.0%First choice Second choice ...
Can you think of a specific school you havetaken off your list because of the experienceyou had with the Web site?Why pay ...
Approximate cost to maintain admissions Webpresence© 2012 Noel-Levitz, Inc.
Mobile gap52% of college-bound studentshave looked at acollege Web siteon a mobilephone or tabletLess than 40%of colleges ...
Benchmarks forAdmissions and Marketing
Effective search campaigns include multiplecontacts. Sending a search mailer and waitingfor a response typically does not ...
Cost to recruit a single student*Limited sample size for this sector.© 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2011 Cost of Recruiting an Un...
Median number of new students enrolled perFTE employee in recruitment or admissions*Limited sample size for this sector© 2...
Median number of new students enrolledper FTE outreach employee*Limited sample size for this sector.© 2011 Noel-Levitz, In...
Marketing andRecruitment PlanDevelop annual andlong-range as well asretention andrecruitment plans –for each marketsegment
What isWhat is strategicenrollment planning(SEP)?
Strategic Enrollment Planning …• Involves the campus inidentifying, prioritizing, implementing, evaluating, and modifying ...
Effective organizationmodelsStrategic planMissionVisionInstitutionalEffectivenessStrategic Enrollment PlanKPIStrategiesEnr...
The value of notplanningThe nicest thing about not planning is thatfailure comes as a complete surprise andis not preceded...
How does the strategic enrollmentplanning model differ from thetraditional planning model?
Strategic Planning=Align organization withits environmentto promote stabilityand survivalTraditional Planning=Set goals th...
• Provides realistic quantifiable goals• Uses a return-on-investment (ROI) andaction item approach• Aligns the institution...
Connects your goals to:• Product (academic, co-curricular,services, support)• Place (on-site, off-site, online, hybrid)• P...
Integration of all elements of SEM as part ofthe development of a Strategic EnrollmentManagement PlanSEP• AcademicPlans• M...
Organizing for strategic planningInstitutionalStrategic PlanStrategicEnrollment PlanRecruitmentPlanningCommitteeMarketingP...
Communication is keyto success• Preparation• Data Collection• Key Performance Indicators• Situation AnalysisPhase One:Data...
Sample Table of Contents for thefinalized SEP planIntroduction and Executive SummaryOrganizational Structure for Planning ...
Key Performance IndicatorsEnrollmentExternalMarket demandSelectivityDiversityTrue CapacityPricing and Net CostsPersistence...
Strategic Enrollment Management Council(SEMC)Goals• Assesses progress towards goalobtainmentKPI• Monitors KPIsStrategyImpl...
Typical elements in astrategic enrollment plan
• Resources• Dollars• Time• Staff• Technology• Expected level of strategy impact• Priority to accomplishing enrollmentproj...
A multi-year tool should have the abilityto model the following items:• Enrollment (first-year, transfer, full-time, part-...
Scenarios provide comparisons© Noel-Levitz, Inc. All rights reservedNoel-Levitz UniversityCurrent Date:February 28, 2012La...
Factoring in Financial Aid© Noel-Levitz, Inc. All rights reserved2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014Actual P...
End Result© Noel-Levitz, Inc. All rights reservedNoel-Levitz UniversityCurrent Date:February 28, 2012Last Modified Date: R...
Five points to remember relative to calculatingand communicating ROI1. Optimal number of students for your capacity2. The ...
Strategic enrollmentgrowth matrixExistingPrograms/ServicesNewPrograms/ServicesExistingMarketsNewMarketsMarketpenetrationPr...
Evaluating the economics of programs– strategic responseManage Grow or buildStartReduce or eliminateEnrollmentas%ofCapacit...
The quality perception of Group Aschools is relatively weak; in fact, theyare almost indistinguishable from thecommunity c...
Job placement and progression tograduate schoolYearSurveyResponsePlacementRateEmployedGraduate orProfessional School2009 8...
Assessing alumni satisfactionNot at AllSatisfied/Not VerySatisfiedSomewhat Satisfied Satisfied/Very SatisfiedMy Sample U e...
Competition, market demand,program strengthProgram:What we do best-- AuthenticityMarket Demand:What students want-- Releva...
Adams State CollegeAngelo State UniversityArkansas StateUniversity-Main CampusArkansas Tech UniversityAuburn University at...
Occupations with the largest numericalgrowth requiring at least a BA2008-18Occupation # of NewJobs% Change 2008 MedianWage...
Occupations with the largest numericalgrowth requiring at least a BA2008-18U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Stati...
Sample University’s out-of-state market:All students with B+ and above GPAOH IN IL MD VA NJ PA TN WV MO TXMedical Physicia...
USM’s admission selectivity average ACT is 23Selectivity Level ACT SAT(Middle 50%) (Middle 50%)Highly selective 25–30 1710...
SMU’ selectivity average ACT is 23Selectivity Level ACT SAT(Middle 50%) (Middle 50%)Highly selective 25–30 1710–2000Select...
0063.753.948.293.478.362.753.662.288.480.269.944.866.293.984.474.2 75.171.60255075100Highly selective Selective Traditiona...
4247.871.347.386.168.441.5 42.3 44.282.465.349.4 48.1 47.384.666.451.748.956.10255075100Highly selective Selective Traditi...
Questions anddiscussion
FOCUSMISSIONon the& VISION
2014 Strategic PlanMission & VisionVision representswhere we want to go.Mission is ourraison dêtre. Itrepresents who we are.
Our MissionEducates students of diverse backgroundsto realize their God-given potentialAnd prepares them for value-centere...
Our MissionEducates students ofdiverse backgrounds to realizetheir God-given potentialand prepares themfor value-centered ...
Our MissionEducates students ofdiverse backgrounds to realizetheir God-given potentialand prepares themfor value-centered ...
2014 Strategic PlanMission & VisionVision representswhere we want to go.Mission is ourraison dêtre. Itrepresents who we are.
2014 Strategic Plan2006 Plan Vision Statement―The University of Saint Mary will realize its missionthrough regional recogn...
2014 Strategic Plan2011 Plan Vision Statement―USM will advance its mission by continuing development ofhealth science prog...
2014 Strategic Plan2014 Vision
The Benefits of Visioningpurposebreakingboundariesoutside the box visionunique solutions laser-like focuscommitmentcreativ...
USM Administration
USM Board of Trustees
2014 Strategic PlanEnvisioning the Future ForestPRODUCTDELIVERYBUSINESS MODELAccountabilityPerceived ValueDemandHowWhere-O...
Envisioning the Future ForestQuestions for Group Discussions‗What opportunities and risks do yousee for USM given the curr...
Envisioning the Future ForestQuestions for Group Discussions‗Considering the characteristics of USMstudents and the demand...
Envisioning the Future ForestQuestions for Group Discussions‗What challenges does the currentenvironment pose to USM‘s bus...
Bot retreat april 2013 final2
Bot retreat april 2013 final2
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  • Even though the majority of schools report having written annual and long-range plans, a significant number fail to rate their plans as good or excellent.
  • Approximately 40% of students are dissatisfied nationally. Two-year publics have higher overall satisfaction than the other sectors.
  • The 15-year Study – SSI SuiteSSI first available in 1994-95Looking at the results across all 15 years, including a special comparison of the original academic year of data with the more recent 2009-10 academic year to see what has shifted over timeThe SSI has been completed by more than 2,400 four-year and two-year, public, and private institutions over 15 yearsNational reports can be found at www.noellevitz.com/benchmark
  • Nearly 2/3 of 4yr institutions and more than 90% of 2yr institutions are now spending less than $25K to maintain admissions-specific content and services on their institution’s Web site.
  • Bot retreat april 2013 final2

    1. 1. Focus on the FutureUSM Board of Trustees‘ Retreat
    2. 2. Looking BackToday‘s ConditionsFocus on the FutureOverview
    3. 3. History & BackgroundIt is wisdom to pause,to look back and seeby what straight ortwisting paths we havearrived at the place wefind ourselves.‖- Mother Xavier Ross
    4. 4. History & BackgroundFiscal Years 2000-200502,000,0004,000,0006,000,0008,000,00010,000,00012,000,00014,000,0002000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005Revenue Expenses Special GiftExpenditures exceededrevenues by $3.3 million.Expenditures will exceedrevenues by $1.8 million.Operating Results
    5. 5. FOCUS
    6. 6. 2006 Strategic PlanA new focus:Health Sciences and Fiscal Stability
    7. 7. Health Sciences2006 Strategic Plan
    8. 8. 2006 Strategic PlanNursing ProgramsTraditional on-campus BSNRN-to-BSNAccelerated BSNMSNHealth Sciences
    9. 9. 2006 Strategic PlanHealth Sciences050100150200250Fall 09 Fall 10 Fall 11 Fall 12RN-to-BSNPre-nursingAccel. BSNUG NursingNursing Programs Enrollment
    10. 10. 2006 Strategic PlanStefani Doctor of Physical TherapyDirector Mark Horacekhired in August 2009Health SciencesProgram granted CAPTEcandidacy in May 2012.
    11. 11. 2006 Strategic PlanDPT Program EnrollmentHealth Sciences020406080100120SU 12 SU 13 SU 14ProjectedProjected
    12. 12. 2006 Strategic PlanHealth Information Management (HIM)Director Don Kellogg hired inMarch 2012In accreditation candidacy statuswith CAHIIM (HIM programaccrediting body)Health Sciences
    13. 13. 2006 Strategic PlanHIM Program EnrollmentHealth Sciences02468101214161820Fall 12 Fall 13 Fall 14ProjectedProjected
    14. 14. 2006 Strategic PlanTotal Health Sciences EnrollmentHealth Sciences050100150200250300350Fall 09 Fall 10 Fall 11 Fall 12RN-to-BSNPre-nursingUG NursingAccel. BSNDPTHIM
    15. 15. 2006 Strategic PlanGrowth in Related Science ProgramsBiology is now the second mostpopular major at USM, behind onlynursingMed School success stories:John Cothern and Tawana EvansHealth Sciences
    16. 16. Fiscal Stability2006 Strategic Plan
    17. 17. 2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityOperating Results (FYE 2006-2013)02,000,0004,000,0006,000,0008,000,00010,000,00012,000,00014,000,00016,000,00018,000,00020,000,00022,000,0002006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013Revenue Expenses Special GiftExpenditures exceededrevenues by $1.5 million.Revenues exceededexpenditures by $447,000.Expenditures will exceedrevenues by $1.1 million.
    18. 18. 2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityUndergraduate Main Campus Enrollment Growth0501001502002503003504004505005502005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012Fall SemesterFRESHMENNEW TRANSFERS116 FreshmenTotal Full-Time, Main Campus Enrollment hasincreased by 181, or 50%, from Fall 2005 to 2012.TOTAL199 Total New Students
    19. 19. 2006 Strategic PlanTotal EnrollmentFiscal Stability01002003004005006007008009001,0001,1001,2002005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012Fall Year8391,0479931,0739578861,189DoctorateFT UndergraduatePT UndergraduateOPC GradAll OnlineOnline Program began in FYE 2007.Total student headcount increased by 372,or 46%, from Fall 2005 to Fall 2012.817
    20. 20. 2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityOther New ProgramsCheer & Dance – Nearly 20 new studentsCross Country/Track & Field – Over 30 new studentsOnline Programs
    21. 21. 2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityOnline Programs Enrollment050100150200250300350400Fall 09 Fall 10 Fall 11 Fall 12 Fall 13Projected
    22. 22. 2006 Strategic PlanFiscal StabilityFall 2012 Enrollment Populations57315115011616237FT UndergraduatePT UndergraduateOnline UndergraduateOPC GraduateOnline GraduateDoctorateFull-Time Undergraduate enrollmentis about 48% of total enrollment forthe Fall 2012 Semester.GraduatesUndergraduates
    23. 23. 2006 Strategic PlanFiscal Stability01,000,0002,000,0003,000,0004,000,0005,000,0006,000,0007,000,0008,000,0009,000,00010,000,00011,000,00012,000,00013,000,00014,000,00015,000,00016,000,00017,000,0002006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 March 2013Restricted Unrestricted TransferThe restricted endowment portion hasincreased from $6.1 million to $12.6million, or 107%, from FYE 2006 to March $3.4 million$16,407,221Endowment Growth
    24. 24. 2006 Strategic PlanImproved FacilitiesMcGilley Field House Berkel Residence HallNew Construction
    25. 25. 2006 Strategic PlanImproved FacilitiesRenovationsMead HallNursingStudent ServicesBerchmans HallHealth Sciences
    26. 26. REFOCUS
    27. 27. 2011 Strategic PlanHealth SciencesImproved RetentionFacilities and Technology Infrastructure
    28. 28. 2011 Strategic PlanImproved RetentionImproving Retention RatesFirst-time Full-time FreshmenFall 2011 – 52%Fall 2012 – 65%Fall 2013 goal – 70%
    29. 29. 2011 Strategic PlanImproved RetentionAthletes‘ GPAAthletes with aGPA above 3.0Fall 2010: 50%Fall 2012: 61%Athletes with aGPA below 1.9Fall 2010: 15%Fall 2012: 8%
    30. 30. 2011 Strategic PlanFacilities and Technology InfrastructureBerchmans as Health Sciences HeadquartersUtilizing ‗The Cloud‘Classroom Technology
    31. 31. FOCUSonTODAY
    32. 32. Current EnvironmentMassive Open Online CoursesMOOCs
    33. 33. MOOCsWhat are they?New web-based tools/ ―platforms‖What distinguishes them from traditional classesand makes them attractive?Unlimited enrollment, name recognition, andcost – they are free!
    34. 34. MOOCsFour Comments on Those Observations1. The originators are not accrediting their own courses2. The originators were individual professors3. Remaining free is not going to be sustainable4. The completion rate is between 5% and 10%
    35. 35. MOOCsThree Explanatory Notes1. Most are asynchronous2. A few are moving in a synchronous direction3. Completion rate at 5% to 10%
    36. 36. MOOCsWho Are They?CourseraedXUdacity
    37. 37. MOOCsThe Promise and the Apparent Reality of MOOCsMOOCs will transform teaching and learning―The revolution is not about IT. It is about teachingand learning.‖
    38. 38. MOOCsThe Promise and the Apparent Reality of MOOCsAlthough still a ―moving target‖ and not fullymatured, MOOCs are not proving to be a disrupter, butrather ―just one spice among many online educationspices.‖The challenge of picking what spice or spices to use
    39. 39. MOOCsWho Are the Biggest Users of MOOCs?People living outside the USAmong US students:– Non-traditional students• Not enrolled in a degree program• Seeking to enhance their skills• Just intellectually curious
    40. 40. MOOCsWhat Schools are Most Likely to be Affected, If Any?Potentially most affected: small, marginal, independent collegesLeast likely: selective, well-established independent collegesSomewhere in the middle: the publics, including communitycollegesThe California State University System Experiment
    41. 41. MOOCsSome Unresolved IssuesWhere do MOOCs appear to be heading?Political pressure to expand educational opportunities andcontain costs – will MOOCs fill the bill?The illusion of name brandFuture costs
    42. 42. MOOCsOther ConsiderationsEmployer ResponsesAccreditorsState Authorization
    43. 43. MOOCsMOOCs May Already Be Yesterday‘s NewsA note on competency-based learningWhat is it?What are its potential advantages?Western Governors UniversitySouthern New Hampshire UniversityWhat are the potential liabilities?
    44. 44. MOOCsRecommended Resources―What you need to know about MOOCs‖ on the Chronicle ofHigher Education websitehttp://chronicle.com/article/What-You-Need-to-Know-About/133475
    45. 45. Current EnvironmentStudent LoanBubble PuttingHundreds ofColleges at Risk— Business Insider | August 2012Colleges take extreme cost-cutting measures— CNN Money | March 2012Does It Still MakeSense to Borrow toPay for College?— The Daily Ticker | April 2012
    46. 46. Strategic EnrollmentTraditional Enrollment PlanningAnnual ScopeFocus on the Admissions DepartmentAdministrationAthleticsAdmissions Academics
    47. 47. Strategic EnrollmentFiscalPlanEnrollmentPlanResearchPlanFacilitiesPlanTechnologyPlanFundraisingPlanAcademicPlanStudent AffairsCo-Curricular PlanMISSION
    48. 48. Strategic EnrollmentWelcome Rob Baird
    49. 49. The Imperative of Strategic EnrollmentPlanningRob BairdSenior Vice President and Principal
    50. 50. Why Plan?
    51. 51. What will be necessary to change in ourenrollment processes, priorities andsystems to achieve our enrollment goalsand respond to the institutional strategicplan within an ever changing environment?
    52. 52.  Increasing enrollment? Improving gross and net revenue? Filling under enrolled programs? Improving geographical representation? Improving diversity Improving retention Attracting better qualified students(more likely to persist) Improving efficiency and effectiveness of operations? Determining and responding to program demand locally, regionally, and/ornationally Improving awareness, image, and perception of the institution? Professional staff development and ongoing training in state-of-the-art enrollmentmanagement practices? Introducing and enhancing the ‘breakthrough enrollment technologies andsystems?” OtherKey Questions to Consider
    53. 53. My institution has a written, long-range strategic enrollment planPercent of respondents in agreementType of institution YesYes and it’s ofexcellent quality*Four-year private 69.5% 18.0%Four-year public 64.6% 23.1%Two-year public 61.4% 4.5%*Indicates the percentage of respondentswho rated the quality of their plan “excellent”as opposed to “good,” “fair,” “poor,” or “no” (nonexistent)© 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2011 Marketing and Student Recruitment Practices at Four-Year and Two-Year Institutions
    54. 54. Nearly 40 years; 60+ consultants; 500 yearsexperience; 2,700 campuses served
    55. 55. Noel-Levitz Partnership Funnel
    56. 56. Understanding thechanging landscape
    57. 57. Six megatrends facing higher educationEnrollment growthwill slowDemographic shiftsRetention andcompletion pressureswill intensifyChanging economicmodelImpact oftechnology oncommunicatingwith studentsManaging newlearning modalities
    58. 58. Higher education’s compounded annualgrowth rates is expected to drop by 39 percentfrom 1.8 to 1.1 percent5.6% 1.1%1963-1980 1980-2009 2009-20201.8%NCES Projections of Education Statistics to 2020 ( 2011); p. 62
    59. 59. We are at the beginning of a long slump forfuture freshman classes4,200,0004,300,0004,400,0004,500,0004,600,0002008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 2022Data Source: Population Projections Branch of the U.S. Census BureauProjected Number of 18-Year Olds: United States
    60. 60. $75,486$68,961$39,538 $38,500$0$10,000$20,000$30,000$40,000$50,000$60,000$70,000$80,000Asian White Hispanic AfricanAmericanHispanic and African American families have medianincomes that are approximately 57 percent of whitefamiliesTrends in College Pricing, 2011. © 2011. The College Board.Reproduced with permission. www.collegeboard.com.
    61. 61. Projected percentage change in the number ofpublic high school graduates, by state:School years 2007-08 through 2020-21Source: IES
    62. 62. † In-state institutions receiving thelargest number of in-statefreshmen.†† Competition factor equalscollege continuation rate lessnumber of students migrating andthe three in-state institutionsreceiving the largest number of in-state freshmen.Kansas: The competition factor32,289 high school seniors / 2012-13*67 institutions of higher education**64.7% college continuation rate (20,891)***(ranks 17th among states)15.6% leave the state to go to college (3,262)****(ranks 31st among states)Three Largest Institutions†***** Number of In-state Freshmen*****Kansas State University 2,763University of Kansas 2,467Johnson County Community College 1,44510,954 students ÷ 64 institutions = 171 students per institution††Sources:*Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Knocking at the College Door, 2012**The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2012***Postsecondary Education Opportunity, Chance for College by Age 19 by State 1986-2010, 2013****Postsecondary Education Opportunity, Interstate Migration of College Freshmen 1986-2010, 2012*****National Center for Education Statistics, IPEDS Fall Enrollment Survey (2010)
    63. 63. † In-state institutions receiving thelargest number of in-statefreshmen.†† Competition factor equalscollege continuation rate lessnumber of students migrating andthe three in-state institutionsreceiving the largest number of in-state freshmen.Sources:*Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2008**The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2010***Postsecondary Education Opportunity, 2010****Postsecondary Education Opportunity, Interstate Migration Data, 2010*****National Center for Education Statistics, IPEDS Fall Enrollment Survey (2010)Missouri: The competition factor65,304 high school seniors / 2011-12*132 institutions of higher education**60.0% college continuation rate (39,182)***(ranks 33rd among states)17.7% leave the state to go to college (6,933)****(ranks 29th among states)Three Largest Institutions†***** Number of In-state Freshmen*****University of Missouri – Columbia 4,297Missouri State University – Springfield 2,279Ozarks Technical Community College 2,03723,636 students ÷ 129 institutions = 183 students per institution††
    64. 64. † In-state institutions receiving thelargest number of in-statefreshmen.†† Competition factor equalscollege continuation rate lessnumber of students migrating andthe three in-state institutionsreceiving the largest number of in-state freshmen.Sources:*Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2008**The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2010***Postsecondary Education Opportunity, 2010****Postsecondary Education Opportunity, Interstate Migration Data, 2010*****National Center for Education Statistics, IPEDS Fall Enrollment Survey (2010)Nebraska: The competition factor21,176 high school seniors / 2011-12*43 institutions of higher education**65.5% college continuation rate (13,870)***(ranks 18th among states)19.1% leave the state to go to college (2,648)****(ranks 25th among states)Three Largest Institutions†***** Number of In-state Freshmen*****University of Nebraska – Lincoln 3,189University of Nebraska at Omaha 1,539Southeast Community College Area 1,0825,412 students ÷ 40 institutions = 135 students per institution††
    65. 65. † In-state institutions receiving thelargest number of in-statefreshmen.†† Competition factor equalscollege continuation rate lessnumber of students migrating andthe three in-state institutionsreceiving the largest number of in-state freshmen.Sources:*Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2008**The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2010***Postsecondary Education Opportunity, 2010****Postsecondary Education Opportunity, Interstate Migration Data, 2010*****National Center for Education Statistics, IPEDS Fall Enrollment Survey (2010)Texas: The competition factor279,129 high school seniors / 2011-12*240 institutions of higher education**56.9% college continuation rate (158,824)***(ranks 41st among states)11.7% leave the state to go to college (18,617)****(ranks 40th among states)Three Largest Institutions†***** Number of In-state Freshmen*****Texas A & M University – College Station 7,809The University of Texas at Austin 6,368The University of Texas at San Antonio 4,721121,309 students ÷ 237 institutions = 512 students per institution††
    66. 66. • 60 percent of all four-year institutions wantlarger freshman classes• 56 percent of all four-year colleges wantbetter freshman classes• 52 percent want a more ethnically diversestudent bodyInstitutions are facing never-endingexpectations
    67. 67. Miles from home4.8%6.2%26.3%17.4%31.4%14.0%0.0%5.0%10.0%15.0%20.0%25.0%30.0%35.0%5 or less 6 to 10 11 to 50 51 to 100 101 to 500 Over 500© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All Rights Reserved.
    68. 68. Percentage of students satisfied orvery satisfied with theiroverall experience© 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2011 National Student Satisfaction and Priorities Report57%54%61%53%48%50%52%54%56%58%60%62%Four-yearprivatesFour-yearpublicsCommunitycollegesCareer schools
    69. 69. College choice trends
    70. 70. Importance factorsin the decision to enroll
    71. 71. Four-year private enrollmentfactorsItem 2009-10ImportancePercentage1994-95ImportancePercentageShiftFinancial aid 81.0% 75.9% 5.1%Academic reputation 78.8% 78.9% -0.1%Cost 74.3% 67.5% 6.8%Personal attention prior to enrollment 64.6% 60.5% 4.1%Geographic setting 57.4% 53.3% 4.1%Campus appearance 57.4% 51.8% 5.6%Size of institution 56.4% 65.1% -8.7%Recommendations from family/friends 42.7% 39.9% 2.8%Opportunity to play sports 26.7% 24.6% 2.1%© Noel-Levitz, Inc.The National Student Satisfaction and Priorities 15-Year Trend Report: Four-Year Private Colleges and Universities
    72. 72. What content matters most to themat this point?1. A list of academic programs or degrees2. Cost/tuition/fees3. Academic program details4. Admissions requirements5. Financial aid6. Scholarships7. Student life8. Career options9. Student activities10. Ways to connect with admissions© Noel-Levitz, Inc.E-Expectations 2010: Focusing Your E-Recruitment Efforts to Meet the Expectations of College-Bound Students
    73. 73. Impact of the economic crisis on studentcollege planning• 46% report that the current economic crisis has causedthem to reconsider the schools to which they apply ormay attend (up from 34% last year)– Avoiding private school options—26% (11%)– Commuting instead of living on campus—25% (13%)– Working while going to school—25% (21%)– Attending a community or technical college—19% (21%)– Vo-tech instead of traditional—4% (2%)– Part-time attendance instead of full-time—1% (7%)– Not attending college at all—1% (2%)© Noel-Levitz, Inc.E-Expectations Report: Focusing Your E-Recruitment Efforts to Meet the Expectations of College-Bound Students
    74. 74. What is the highest academic degree youintend to obtain?1.0% 0.1% 0.4%21.4%42.0%19.1%10.2%4.2%0.2% 1.3%0.0%5.0%10.0%15.0%20.0%25.0%30.0%35.0%40.0%45.0%NoneVocational certificateAA BA, BS MA, MS PhD or EdDMD, DO, DDS, DVM JD BD or MDIV Other© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All Rights Reserved.
    75. 75. Number of other colleges applied to foradmission this year12.2%8.8%11.7%14.7%13.3%10.5%7.9%16.4%4.6%0.0%2.0%4.0%6.0%8.0%10.0%12.0%14.0%16.0%18.0%None 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 to 10 11 ormore© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All Rights Reserved.
    76. 76. The college attended is the student’s…57.9%27.0%9.7%5.5%0.0%10.0%20.0%30.0%40.0%50.0%60.0%70.0%First choice Second choice Third choice Less thanthird choice© 2012 The Regents of the University of California. All Rights Reserved.
    77. 77. Can you think of a specific school you havetaken off your list because of the experienceyou had with the Web site?Why pay close attention toyour Web site?Yes 24%Noel-Levitz, E-Expectations survey of 1,043college-bound seniors ©2010
    78. 78. Approximate cost to maintain admissions Webpresence© 2012 Noel-Levitz, Inc.
    79. 79. Mobile gap52% of college-bound studentshave looked at acollege Web siteon a mobilephone or tabletLess than 40%of colleges offerWeb sites thatare optimizedfor mobilebrowsing© 2012 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2012 E-Recruiting Practices and Trends at Four-Year and Two-Year Institutions
    80. 80. Benchmarks forAdmissions and Marketing
    81. 81. Effective search campaigns include multiplecontacts. Sending a search mailer and waitingfor a response typically does not work withtoday’s prospective students.© 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2011 Marketing and Student Recruitment Practices at Four-Year and Two-Year Institutions
    82. 82. Cost to recruit a single student*Limited sample size for this sector.© 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2011 Cost of Recruiting an Undergraduate Student: Benchmarks for Four-Year and Two-Year Institutions$1,364$342$37$2,185$457$108$3,172$642$313$0$500$1,000$1,500$2,000$2,500$3,000$3,500Four-year private Four-year public Two-year public*25th percentile Median cost 75th percentile
    83. 83. Median number of new students enrolled perFTE employee in recruitment or admissions*Limited sample size for this sector© 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2011 Cost of Recruiting an Undergraduate Student: Benchmarks for Four-Year and Two-Year Institutions33117328050100150200250300350Four-year private Four-year public Two-year public*
    84. 84. Median number of new students enrolledper FTE outreach employee*Limited sample size for this sector.© 2011 Noel-Levitz, Inc.2011 Cost of Recruiting an Undergraduate Student: Benchmarks for Four-Year and Two-Year Institutions572565330100200300400500600Four-year private Four-year public Two-year public*
    85. 85. Marketing andRecruitment PlanDevelop annual andlong-range as well asretention andrecruitment plans –for each marketsegment
    86. 86. What isWhat is strategicenrollment planning(SEP)?
    87. 87. Strategic Enrollment Planning …• Involves the campus inidentifying, prioritizing, implementing, evaluating, and modifying enrollment strategies and goals within achanging environment in order to effectively andefficiently : Realize the institution’s mission and vision, and Support the institution’s capabilities to recruit andmaximally serve students currently and in the future.
    88. 88. Effective organizationmodelsStrategic planMissionVisionInstitutionalEffectivenessStrategic Enrollment PlanKPIStrategiesEnrollmentGoalsAnnual PlansMarketing RecruitmentSuccess andCompletion(PPRC/G)
    89. 89. The value of notplanningThe nicest thing about not planning is thatfailure comes as a complete surprise andis not preceded by a period of worry anddepression.““John PrestonBoston College
    90. 90. How does the strategic enrollmentplanning model differ from thetraditional planning model?
    91. 91. Strategic Planning=Align organization withits environmentto promote stabilityand survivalTraditional Planning=Set goals thendevelop steps toachieve those goals
    92. 92. • Provides realistic quantifiable goals• Uses a return-on-investment (ROI) andaction item approach• Aligns the institution’s mission, currentstate, and changing environment to fosterplanned long-term enrollment and fiscalhealthStrategic enrollment planning iscontinuous and data-informed
    93. 93. Connects your goals to:• Product (academic, co-curricular,services, support)• Place (on-site, off-site, online, hybrid)• Price and Revenue(tuition, fees, discounts, incentives)• Promotion (marketing, recruitment,Web presence)• Purpose and Identity(mission, distinctiveness, brand)• Process (data-informed,integrated planning)Strategic enrollment planning
    94. 94. Integration of all elements of SEM as part ofthe development of a Strategic EnrollmentManagement PlanSEP• AcademicPlans• MarketingPlan• StudentSuccessPlan• RecruitmentPlanTarget newstudentenrollment goalsor new marketpenetrationPPRC/GStart, Grow,Maintain, EliminateprogramsLinking internaland externalcommunicationsStrategic enrolment Plan
    95. 95. Organizing for strategic planningInstitutionalStrategic PlanStrategicEnrollment PlanRecruitmentPlanningCommitteeMarketingPlanningCommitteeRetentionPlanningCommitteeClear goalsKey strategiesDetailedAction PlansObjectivesTimetablesResponsibilityBudgetsEvaluation
    96. 96. Communication is keyto success• Preparation• Data Collection• Key Performance Indicators• Situation AnalysisPhase One:Data Analysis• Strategy Development• Tactics Identified• Strategy PrioritizationPhase Two:Strategies• ROI Considerations• Enrollment Projection• Goal Setting• Finalize Written PlanPhase ThreeEnrollment Goals• Implementation of Plan• Form Strategic EM CouncilPhase Four:ImplementationIntroduction to the SEP phases:
    97. 97. Sample Table of Contents for thefinalized SEP planIntroduction and Executive SummaryOrganizational Structure for Planning and FociSituation AnalysisMission, Vision, Key Performance Indicators, Planning Assumptions,Strategies and Priorities for actionEnrollment goals, projections, and return on investmentsFuture structure to monitor enrollment managementSummary
    98. 98. Key Performance IndicatorsEnrollmentExternalMarket demandSelectivityDiversityTrue CapacityPricing and Net CostsPersistence &GraduationExperience &EngagementPossibleindicators
    99. 99. Strategic Enrollment Management Council(SEMC)Goals• Assesses progress towards goalobtainmentKPI• Monitors KPIsStrategyImplementation• Sets priorities and budget dollarslinked to priorities to accomplish goals
    100. 100. Typical elements in astrategic enrollment plan
    101. 101. • Resources• Dollars• Time• Staff• Technology• Expected level of strategy impact• Priority to accomplishing enrollmentprojection• Campus readiness for implementationROI strategy analysis
    102. 102. A multi-year tool should have the abilityto model the following items:• Enrollment (first-year, transfer, full-time, part-time, etc.)• Direct cost – tuition and fees (sometimes room and/or board)• Residency• Retention• Revenue and institutional aid annualization/realization− Annualization factors adjust for revenue due to mid-year attrition (i.e., whoyou lose after fall and pick up in spring)− Annualization factors allow you to estimate annual revenues andexpenditures from fall term enrollment− For example, if the presence of one freshman in the fall term indicates thatyou will collect 99% of an FTE annual tuition (when in-year attrition andsubsequent term enrollees are considered), the annualization factor fortuition revenue for freshmen would be 99%• Model institutional aid (funded and unfunded), discount rate,and net revenue by class as well as on the aggregate
    103. 103. Scenarios provide comparisons© Noel-Levitz, Inc. All rights reservedNoel-Levitz UniversityCurrent Date:February 28, 2012Last Modified Date: Enrollment Projections Combining All ScenariosJanuary 30, 2011Model #1: Full-time/BachelorsFall of 2010 Fall of 2011 Fall of 2012 Fall of 2013 Fall of 2014 Fall of 2015 Fall of 2016 Fall of 2017 Fall of 2018 Fall of 2019 Fall of 2020Freshmen 458 462 463 463 463 463 463 463 463 463 463Sophomore 270 300 305 306 306 306 306 306 306 306 306Junior 220 228 247 252 253 253 253 253 253 253 253Senior 228 232 240 255 261 262 262 262 262 262 262Total 1,176 1,222 1,255 1,276 1,283 1,284 1,284 1,284 1,284 1,284 1,284Scenario #2: 5% increase in new; 5% increase in retentionFall of 2010 Fall of 2011 Fall of 2012 Fall of 2013 Fall of 2014 Fall of 2015 Fall of 2016 Fall of 2017 Fall of 2018 Fall of 2019 Fall of 2020Freshmen 458 462 471 486 503 520 539 558 578 600 622Sophomore 270 300 329 337 346 356 366 377 388 400 413Junior 220 228 248 269 276 282 290 297 305 314 323Senior 228 232 242 260 278 286 292 299 306 313 321Total 1,176 1,222 1,290 1,352 1,403 1,444 1,487 1,531 1,577 1,627 1,679Scenario 3: 5% new student every other year; plus 5% retention increase in 2012; 1% in 2013, 2% in 2014Fall of 2010 Fall of 2011 Fall of 2012 Fall of 2013 Fall of 2014 Fall of 2015 Fall of 2016 Fall of 2017 Fall of 2018 Fall of 2019 Fall of 2020Freshmen 458 462 463 476 478 492 494 508 511 526 544Sophomore 270 300 328 313 323 320 327 328 335 338 346Junior 220 228 247 267 259 265 264 268 271 275 278Senior 228 232 241 258 273 270 274 275 277 281 283Total 1,176 1,222 1,279 1,314 1,333 1,347 1,359 1,379 1,394 1,420 1,451
    104. 104. Factoring in Financial Aid© Noel-Levitz, Inc. All rights reserved2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014Actual Projected Projected Projected ProjectedTotal Enrollment 2367 2536 2625 2760 2923Tuition revenue $43,769,546 $49,307,508 $53,364,871 $58,856,214 $65,384,548Required fee revenue $1,576,470 $1,846,357 $1,930,236 $2,129,487 $2,365,672Room/board revenue $15,208,685 $16,581,903 $18,066,523 $19,988,345 $22,202,265Other charges $443,767 $0 $0 $0 $0Total revenue $60,998,468 $67,735,768 $73,361,630 $80,974,046 $89,952,485Unfunded gift aid - tuition $16,636,731 $20,337,206 $22,943,014 $26,558,534 $29,017,554Unfunded gift aid - room/board $0 $0 $0 $0 $0Funded gift aid $3,437,548 $2,975,000 $2,975,000 $2,175,000 $2,175,000Total institutional gift $20,074,279 $23,312,206 $25,918,014 $28,733,534 $31,192,554Employee dependent waivers $1,863,153 $1,812,496 $1,652,158 $1,510,827 $1,474,210Net Tuition Revenue (NACUBO) $25,271,737 $27,841,659 $29,377,093 $32,252,167 $36,557,666Overall unfunded net revenue $42,498,584 $45,586,066 $48,766,458 $52,904,685 $59,460,721Tuition Discount Rate (NACUBO) 44.3% 45.6% 46.9% 47.1% 46.0%Overall unfunded discount 28.1% 30.8% 32.0% 33.4% 32.8%Summary of Annual ResultsABC UniversityProjection of Undergraduate Enrollment, Net Revenue and Discountfor the Incoming through 2013-2014 Academic Years
    105. 105. End Result© Noel-Levitz, Inc. All rights reservedNoel-Levitz UniversityCurrent Date:February 28, 2012Last Modified Date: Revenue Projections Combining All ScenariosJanuary 30, 2011Model #1: Full-time/BachelorsFall of 2010 Fall of 2011 Fall of 2012 Fall of 2013 Fall of 2014 Fall of 2015 Fall of 2016 Fall of 2017 Fall of 2018 Fall of 2019 Fall of 2020Tuition RevenueBased onEnrollmentand/StudentRevenueFreshmen $5,086,620 $5,352,512 $5,620,137 $5,901,144 $6,196,201 $6,506,011 $6,831,312 $7,172,877 $7,531,521 $7,908,097Sophomore $3,854,700 $4,114,892 $4,334,803 $4,551,543 $4,779,120 $5,018,076 $5,268,980 $5,532,429 $5,809,050 $6,099,503Junior $2,945,760 $3,350,802 $3,589,564 $3,783,998 $3,973,198 $4,171,858 $4,380,451 $4,599,474 $4,829,447 $5,070,920Senior $2,856,152 $3,102,372 $3,461,084 $3,719,647 $3,920,594 $4,116,623 $4,322,454 $4,538,577 $4,765,506 $5,003,781Total $14,743,232 $15,920,578 $17,005,587 $17,956,332 $18,869,113 $19,812,569 $20,803,197 $21,843,357 $22,935,525 $24,082,301Scenario #2: 5% increase in new; 5% increase in retentionFall of 2010 Fall of 2011 Fall of 2012 Fall of 2013 Fall of 2014 Fall of 2015 Fall of 2016 Fall of 2017 Fall of 2018 Fall of 2019 Fall of 2020Tuition RevenueBased onEnrollmentand/StudentRevenueFreshmen $5,086,620 $5,444,996 $5,899,323 $6,410,962 $6,959,016 $7,573,953 $8,232,985 $8,954,478 $9,760,071 $10,623,837Sophomore $3,854,700 $4,438,687 $4,773,950 $5,146,516 $5,560,022 $6,002,013 $6,491,521 $7,014,975 $7,593,530 $8,232,336Junior $2,945,760 $3,364,368 $3,831,717 $4,127,998 $4,428,624 $4,781,972 $5,142,269 $5,544,820 $5,993,859 $6,473,941Senior $2,856,152 $3,128,225 $3,528,948 $3,961,923 $4,279,732 $4,587,992 $4,932,877 $5,300,781 $5,693,143 $6,130,587Total $14,743,232 $16,376,276 $18,033,938 $19,647,399 $21,227,395 $22,945,929 $24,799,652 $26,815,054 $29,040,603 $31,460,700Scenario 3: 5% new student every other year; plus 5% retention increase in 2012; 1% in 2013, 2%in 2014Fall of 2010 Fall of 2011 Fall of 2012 Fall of 2013 Fall of 2014 Fall of 2015 Fall of 2016 Fall of 2017 Fall of 2018 Fall of 2019 Fall of 2020Tuition RevenueBased onEnrollmentand/StudentRevenueFreshmen $5,086,620 $5,352,512 $5,777,938 $6,092,326 $6,584,300 $6,941,619 $7,495,262 $7,916,502 $8,556,329 $9,291,587Sophomore $3,854,700 $4,425,196 $4,433,965 $4,804,407 $4,997,773 $5,362,454 $5,647,796 $6,056,744 $6,416,533 $6,896,824Junior $2,945,760 $3,350,802 $3,803,228 $3,873,737 $4,161,650 $4,353,243 $4,640,162 $4,926,709 $5,249,399 $5,571,999Senior $2,856,152 $3,115,299 $3,501,802 $3,890,665 $4,040,306 $4,305,171 $4,536,927 $4,798,419 $5,111,096 $5,404,848Total $14,743,232 $16,243,808 $17,516,933 $18,661,135 $19,784,029 $20,962,487 $22,320,147 $23,698,374 $25,333,357 $27,165,257
    106. 106. Five points to remember relative to calculatingand communicating ROI1. Optimal number of students for your capacity2. The desired characteristics of sub-groups of yourstudents as well as overall3. Achieve a targeted net revenue goal bysub-populations of your students4. Control the institution’s discount rate/financial aidexpenditures5. Understand the retention implications of your currentenrollment initiatives, both in terms of recruitment ofpopulations as well as awarding strategies
    107. 107. Strategic enrollmentgrowth matrixExistingPrograms/ServicesNewPrograms/ServicesExistingMarketsNewMarketsMarketpenetrationProgramdevelopmentDiversificationMarketdevelopment
    108. 108. Evaluating the economics of programs– strategic responseManage Grow or buildStartReduce or eliminateEnrollmentas%ofCapacityNet Operating Income Per Student
    109. 109. The quality perception of Group Aschools is relatively weak; in fact, theyare almost indistinguishable from thecommunity colleges
    110. 110. Job placement and progression tograduate schoolYearSurveyResponsePlacementRateEmployedGraduate orProfessional School2009 80.4% 96.0% 57.1% 38.9%2008 79.5% 94.0% 53.0% 41.0%2007 79.0% 97.8% 56.5% 41.3%2006 77.6% 96.6% 54.9% 41.7%2005 70.0% 94.4% 46.9% 47.5%
    111. 111. Assessing alumni satisfactionNot at AllSatisfied/Not VerySatisfiedSomewhat Satisfied Satisfied/Very SatisfiedMy Sample U educationprepared me well for myfirst real job aftergraduation.12% 17% 71%My Sample U educationprepared me well forgraduate school.5% 10% 85%In general, the tuition Ipaid for my education wasa worthwhile investment.6% 14% 80%
    112. 112. Competition, market demand,program strengthProgram:What we do best-- AuthenticityMarket Demand:What students want-- RelevanceCompetition:Unoccupiedmarket positions-- Differentiation
    113. 113. Adams State CollegeAngelo State UniversityArkansas StateUniversity-Main CampusArkansas Tech UniversityAuburn University atMontgomeryBoise State UniversityCameron UniversityCentral WashingtonUniversityDelta State UniversityEastern WashingtonUniversityEmporiaState UniversityFort HaysStateUniversityHenderson State UniversityIndiana University-NorthwestIndiana University-Purdue University-Fort WayneIndiana University-South BendLouisiana State University-ShreveportMinnesota StateUniversityMoorheadMissouri Southern StateUniversityMissouri StateUniversity-SpringfieldMissouri Western StateUniversityMontana State University-BillingsMorehead State UniversityNorthern KentuckyUniversityNorthern State UniversityX universityNet PriceHigh CostLow SelectivityLow CostHigh SelectivityHigh CostHigh SelectivityLow CostLow SelectivitySelectivityNational Center for Education Statistics. Data Feedback Report 2012.
    114. 114. Occupations with the largest numericalgrowth requiring at least a BA2008-18Occupation # of NewJobs% Change 2008 MedianWageRegistered Nurse* 581,500 22% $62,450Accountants and auditors 279,400 22% $59,430Postsecondary teachers 256,900 15% $58,830Elementary schoolteachers244,200 16% $49,330Management analysts 178,300 24% $73,750Computer softwareengineers, applications175,100 34% $85,430U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor StatisticsOccupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Editionhttp://www/bls.gov/oco/* Only requires an AA
    115. 115. Occupations with the largest numericalgrowth requiring at least a BA2008-18U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor StatisticsOccupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Editionhttp://www/bls.gov/oco/Occupation %Change# of New Jobs 2008 MedianWageBiomedical engineers 72% 11,600 $77,400Network systems and datacommunications analysts53% 155,800 $71,000Financial examiners 41% 11,100 $70,930Medical scientists 40% 44,200 $72,590Physician assistants 39% 29,200 $81,250Biochemists and biophysicists 37% 8,700 $82,840Athletic trainers 37% 6,000 $39,640Computer software engineers 34% 175,100 $85,430Veterinarians 33% 19,700 $79,050
    116. 116. Sample University’s out-of-state market:All students with B+ and above GPAOH IN IL MD VA NJ PA TN WV MO TXMedical Physician 11,144 5,733 11,739 4,596 6,790 7,782 11,866 6,587 2,190 5,871 27,502Nursing/Health Care 7,906 4,362 7,760 3,393 4,393 3,741 7,937 4,985 1,548 3,300 20,128Lawyer/Legal Services 5,173 2,417 6,538 3,091 3,802 5,217 6,633 2,861 646 2,912 13,203Engineering (General) 4,171 2,034 4,476 2,413 2,735 3,597 4,943 1,897 610 2,327 11,721Law Enforcement/CriminalJustice 2,977 1,474 3,868 1,839 2,081 2,916 4,106 1,680 467 1,279 8,324Business Owner/Entrepreneur 3,151 1,430 3,275 1,916 2,350 2,445 4,128 1,731 344 1,699 8,476Architecture 3,245 1,497 3,744 1,501 2,096 2,720 3,674 1,251 382 1,626 8,282Culinary/Chef 2,992 1,245 3,672 1,720 2,040 2,476 3,545 1,437 468 1,730 7,187Athletics/Coaching 2,875 1,319 3,112 1,324 1,732 1,815 3,297 1,500 409 1,426 7,375Engineering (Mechanical) 2,774 1,417 2,639 1,200 1,791 1,607 2,811 1,393 481 1,103 7,447Physical Therapy 3,382 1,657 2,875 937 1,586 1,470 3,784 1,769 696 1,290 3,855Child Care/Development 2,448 1,127 2,802 1,240 1,474 1,631 3,166 1,558 367 1,498 5,959Sports Medicine 3,286 1,328 2,343 1,292 1,893 1,523 3,196 1,590 532 1,236 4,614Veterinary Medicine 2,350 1,330 2,040 936 1,483 1,004 2,264 1,232 428 1,144 5,257Military Science 2,267 894 2,179 1,106 1,809 1,671 2,456 1,255 308 1,114 4,142Engineering (Electrical) 1,862 956 2,079 1,254 1,446 1,362 2,106 1,038 416 815 5,767Pharmacy 2,164 1,211 2,109 536 1,054 1,286 2,567 1,433 579 919 4,443Photography/Video/Film 1,821 1,041 2,225 984 1,360 1,417 2,373 947 287 871 4,793Graphic Arts/Design 1,880 900 2,122 991 1,153 1,504 2,331 856 254 967 4,598Fashion Merchandising 1,447 559 1,758 1,047 1,239 1,508 1,822 659 133 730 4,506StatesMajors
    117. 117. USM’s admission selectivity average ACT is 23Selectivity Level ACT SAT(Middle 50%) (Middle 50%)Highly selective 25–30 1710–2000Selective 21–26 1470–1770Traditional 18–24 1290–1650Liberal 17–22 1230–1530Open 16–21 1170–1480Source: Compiled from ACT Institutional Data File, 2012.2012. ACT, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    118. 118. SMU’ selectivity average ACT is 23Selectivity Level ACT SAT(Middle 50%) (Middle 50%)Highly selective 25–30 1710–2000Selective 21–26 1470–1770Traditional 18–24 1290–1650Liberal 17–22 1230–1530Open 16–21 1170–1480Source: Compiled from ACT Institutional Data File, 2012.2012. ACT, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    119. 119. 0063.753.948.293.478.362.753.662.288.480.269.944.866.293.984.474.2 75.171.60255075100Highly selective Selective Traditional Liberal OpenAA BA MA Ph.D.First- to second-year retention rates for private institutionsUSM’s most recent rate is 64%Source: Compiled from ACT Institutional Data File, 2012.2012. ACT, Inc. All Rights Reserved.0.0 0.0
    120. 120. 4247.871.347.386.168.441.5 42.3 44.282.465.349.4 48.1 47.384.666.451.748.956.10255075100Highly selective Selective Traditional Liberal OpenAA BA MA Ph.D.0.0USM’s graduation rate is 51.5Source: Compiled from ACT Institutional Data File, 2012.2012. ACT, Inc. All Rights Reserved.National graduation rates for private institutions
    121. 121. Questions anddiscussion
    122. 122. FOCUSMISSIONon the& VISION
    123. 123. 2014 Strategic PlanMission & VisionVision representswhere we want to go.Mission is ourraison dêtre. Itrepresents who we are.
    124. 124. Our MissionEducates students of diverse backgroundsto realize their God-given potentialAnd prepares them for value-centeredlives and careersThat contribute to the well beingof our global society.
    125. 125. Our MissionEducates students ofdiverse backgrounds to realizetheir God-given potentialand prepares themfor value-centered livesand careersthat contribute to thewell being of ourglobal society.Is it still relevant?Is it appropriate for today?
    126. 126. Our MissionEducates students ofdiverse backgrounds to realizetheir God-given potentialand prepares themfor value-centered livesand careersthat contribute to thewell being of ourglobal society.Are we fulfilling it?Where do we excel?Where do we fall short?
    127. 127. 2014 Strategic PlanMission & VisionVision representswhere we want to go.Mission is ourraison dêtre. Itrepresents who we are.
    128. 128. 2014 Strategic Plan2006 Plan Vision Statement―The University of Saint Mary will realize its missionthrough regional recognition for its nursing program, buildsynergy with the introduction of programs and strategicpartnership in Allied Health, and foster financial stewardshipto further promote and enhance its reputation of academicexcellence.‖
    129. 129. 2014 Strategic Plan2011 Plan Vision Statement―USM will advance its mission by continuing development ofhealth science programs, improving student persistencerates, and enhancing facilities and technology infrastructure.‖
    130. 130. 2014 Strategic Plan2014 Vision
    131. 131. The Benefits of Visioningpurposebreakingboundariesoutside the box visionunique solutions laser-like focuscommitmentcreativity
    132. 132. USM Administration
    133. 133. USM Board of Trustees
    134. 134. 2014 Strategic PlanEnvisioning the Future ForestPRODUCTDELIVERYBUSINESS MODELAccountabilityPerceived ValueDemandHowWhere-Online/Brick & MortarWhenTuitionLoans & AidDiscounting
    135. 135. Envisioning the Future ForestQuestions for Group Discussions‗What opportunities and risks do yousee for USM given the current businessmodel/product/delivery methods?‘
    136. 136. Envisioning the Future ForestQuestions for Group Discussions‗Considering the characteristics of USMstudents and the demand fordegrees, what are the implications forproduct/delivery/business model?‘
    137. 137. Envisioning the Future ForestQuestions for Group Discussions‗What challenges does the currentenvironment pose to USM‘s businessmodel/product/delivery? How do weaddress those challenges?‘

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