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How to build a UX Team

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Presentation from UXCampOttawa
Hiring is hard.
The prospect of growing your team is exciting, but hiring the right person to grow your team is hard. But, that’s what we do as UX professionals, we tackle hard problems, and hiring the right person, can be thought of as just another one of those hard problems. So, before you jump to a conclusion and rush to post that job description to build your clone army, maybe you should pause, and (as you would do with any other design problem) make sure you have defined this hiring “problem” properly. In this talk, I reflect a bit on the nebulous term of user experience and the various skill sets that fit within its container, as well as step through some techniques to help you understand who you should really be looking for to grow your team.

Published in: Design

How to build a UX Team

  1. 1. flacadamian How to build a UX Team . ..and why it's not like building a clone army
  2. 2. How to build a UX Team The many facets of experience design Tool for visualizing the UX "spectrum" of your team Tool for skillset analysis ls hiring the only option?
  3. 3. How to build a UX Team
  4. 4. How to build a UX Team 1 lxD 1 VD 1 Researcher 0.5 UX Manager Shake in an iced cocktail shaker. Strain into a rocks glass with ice. Garnish with a Wacom stylus.
  5. 5. My Background I have worked both in-house and in a consultancy.
  6. 6. My Background I have worked both in-house and in a consultancy. / COREL” (11+ years) (4+ years)
  7. 7. Need to hire someone.
  8. 8. Requisition approved.
  9. 9. Hiring is hard.
  10. 10. It's hard for a bunch of reasons.
  11. 11. D Search pI'O]eClS Discover Start Unicorn Institute: Courses to shape the future of UX design by Jared Spool and Dr. Leslie Jensen-lnman Home Updatesa Backersm Comments“ 9 Chattanooga, TN 0 Design Funded! This project was successfully funded on February 22, 2014. NICORNG D PLAY INST TE Courses to shape the 1 ,53O Backers $133,767 pledged of $21,700 goal 0 seconds to 90 Project by , Jared Spool and Dr. I, Leslie Jensen-Inman .117 mmmmmm
  12. 12. Requisition approved.
  13. 13. Eiui: aim V/ ClL. I'-z’
  14. 14. Expefience Deflgn
  15. 15. Inlorrnalinn User Architecture R“""" Puctices Information Vi“. .. Design _ Design Experience Design Design Process lnlerlclion Management Design Copy Editing & Writing Curning ' I I GIAIIT '
  16. 16. Information User Architecture Research Practices Information Design Visual Experience Design Design Process Management Interaction Design Copy . . . . Editing & Wrmng Curating Jared Spool: Iittp: //www. uie. coin/ articles/ assessing ux teams/ ’ limp: //www. uie. com/ articles/ indispeiisable skills
  17. 17. Jared Spool: httg: //www. uie. com/ articles/ assessing ux teams/ httg: //www. uie. com/ articles/ indisgensable skills Agile Ethnography MetI‘°°I5 . Information User Analytlcs Social . Architecture Research Networks _ Practices Use Cases Information Marketing Design Visual Expefience Dem Deflgn Design Process Management Interaction Technology Deslg” C . . Wrftliz? /g Ecditing & Business uratmg Knowledge Domain ROI Knowledge
  18. 18. Jared Spool: httg1// www. uie. com/ articles/ assessing ux teams/ httg: //www. uie. com/ articles/ indispensable skills Storytelling A _| gi e Sketching Ethnography Methods . Information User Analytlcs Social . Architecture Research Networks . Practices Use Cases Information Marketing Design Visual Expefience Dwm Deflgn Design Process Management Interaction Technology De-°'I9” Critiquing VC/ :(. )I. )y Editing & Presenting riting C t. Business Ura mg K"°W'ed9e Facilitatin 9 Domain RO| Knowledge
  19. 19. Jared Spool: Storytelling A _I gi e Sketching Ethnography Methods . Information User Analytlcs Social A Ht Ct R h Networks rc I e ure esearc Practices Use Cases Information Marketlng Design Visual Expeflence Deg Deflgn Design Process Iittp: //www. uie. corn/ articles/ assessing ux teams/ ’ limp: //www. uie. com/ articles/ indispeiisable skills Management Interaction Technology Deslg” Critiquing V: /Zrgcffilg Editing & Presenting Business Curatmg K”°WIe°I9e Facilitating Domain ROI Knowledge
  20. 20. ., fri. I
  21. 21. Jared Spool: Storytelling A _I gi e Sketching Ethnography Methods . Information User Analytlcs Social A Ht Ct R h Networks rc I e ure esearc Practices Use Cases Information Marketlng Design Visual Expeflence Deg Deflgn Design Process Iittp: //www. uie. corn/ articles/ assessing ux teams/ ’ limp: //www. uie. com/ articles/ indispeiisable skills Management Interaction Technology Deslg” Critiquing V: /Zrgcffilg Editing & Presenting Business Curatmg K”°WIe°I9e Facilitating Domain ROI Knowledge
  22. 22. ., fri. I
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  25. 25. Weaknesses / Edit ". ..such fighters tended to rely too much on their blades, and pay too little attention to the Force. " —Jai Maruk's thoughts on Jar'Kai. I5'°I Despite the advantages offered, Jar'Kai was not without its drawbacks. Firstly, as both hands held individual lightsabers. two-handed blows were impossible, and the duelist was unable to put all his or her weight behind blocks, weakening the defensive capabilities. Thusly, an enemy with a single hilt could simply assault a Jar‘Kai practitioners defense with brute force, battering away until the dual-blade duelist's guard gave way, as shown during Anakin Skywa| ker's duel with Asajj Ventress on Yavin 4. However, this weakness was hardly absolute, as some duelists possessed the physical strength to block power attacks with only one am, examples including Anakin Skywalker battering away Asaii Ventress‘ defense With 8 Series Grievous, whose mechanically augmented strength allowed him to both effectively defend of power strokes. demonstrating one of the primary weaknesses of Jar'Kai. against and dole out heavy power b| ows. I24I Asajj Ventress eventually developed the physical strength necessary to compensate for this weakness, being able to hold up simultaneous bladelocks with both Anakin Skywalker and Ahsoka Tano. both of whom were Form V practitioners. I25I Secondly, because of the gyroscopic effect inherent in Iightsabers, dual blades were more difficult to control than a single blade. Due to this. special training was required to practice Jar'Kai. and without it, a secondary blade was more often a hindrance than an advantage. Fortunately, dual-blade training was often quite standard amongst most Force-using organizations, though advanced training seemed somewhat rarer. I2°II26I Athird trait worthy of note is that Jar'Kai practitioners were often overly reliant on their weapons and bladework, leaving their abilities in other areas undeveIoped. I27I An example of this weakness was evident in the Jedi Battlemaster Raskta Lsu, who was an exceptional duelist, but in her devotion to lightsaber combat, never developed her abilities in the Force, forcing her to rely on both her skill with the b| ade(s) and the support of more Force-adept allies to compensate. I25I Some duelists. such as Asajj Ventress. would become overly reliant on simply having two blades to back up one another, and would be left at a disadvantage if deprived of the one. [29]
  26. 26. Weaknesses _. ‘ Edit ". ..such fighters tended to rely too much on their blades, and pay too little attention to the Force. " —Jai Maruk's thoughts on Jar'Kai. [5'°] . . .1 Anakin Skywalker battering away Asajj Ventress’ defense with a series of power strokes. demonstrating one of the primary weaknesses oi Jar'Kai. practitioners, [25] Despite the advantages offered, Jar'Kai was not without its drawbacks. Firstly, as both hands held individual Iightsabers, tvvo-handed blows were impossible, and the duelist was unable to put all his or her weight behind blocks, weakening the defensive capabilities. Thusly, an enemy with a single hilt could simply assault a Jar'Kai practitioners defense with brute force, battering away until the dual-blade dueIist's guard gave way, as shown during Anakin Skywalker's duel with Asajj Ventress on Yavin 4. However, this weakness was hardly absolute, as some duelists possessed the physical strength to block power attacks with only one arm, examples including Grievous, whose mechanically augmented strength allowed him to both effectively defend against and dole out heavy power blows. [2"] Asajj Ventress eventually developed the physical strength necessary to compensate for this weakness, being able to hold up simultaneous bladelocks with both Anakin Skywalker and Ahsoka Tano, both of whom were Form V Secondly, because of the gyroscopic effect inherent in Iightsabers, dual blades were more difficult to control than a single blade. Due to this. special training was required to practice Jar'Kai. and without it. a secondary blade was more often a hindrance than an advantage. Fortunately, dual-blade training was often quite standard amongst most Force-using organizations, though advanced training seemed somewhat rarer. [2°][26] A third trait worthy of note is that Jar‘Kai practitioners were often overly reliant on their weapons and bladework, leaving their abilities in other areas undeve| oped. [27] An example of this weakness was evident in the Jedi Battlemaster Raskta Lsu, who was an exceptional duelist, but in her devotion to Iightsaber combat, never developed her abilities in the Force, forcing her to rely on both her skill with the b| ade(s) and the support of more Force-adept allies to compensate. [28] Some duelists. such as Asajj Ventress, would become overly reliant on simply having two blades to back up one another, and would be left at a disadvantage if deprived of the one. [29]
  27. 27. ., fri. i
  28. 28. Information Design _ Research Architecture Usability interaction Engineering Design ‘‘IL2| ‘mt-. ii H”m3" *5? Industrial ‘i Factors I “ Design ii i 3 ‘ l ~i 3 / . ‘til i 3) C°”te”t Ca‘ Service ‘J -. J Management ‘o, -,6" Design i "”9eiiloni Technical V Communication | "f°rm_at'°" Design Visual Branding Design mg. 0‘ - I - 9 uugojuflifl ihfluoglm ll ””— #”"'
  29. 29. Information Design . Research Architecture Usability Interaction Engineering Design 4 ‘, a, ‘-tsi i H”m3" , gas’? Industrial ‘i Factors ‘‘ Design 3 l M 2 f _ xiii 0‘) C°”te”t Ca‘ Service U_ 3 Management ‘o, -,6" Design i "”9eiiloni Technical T _ Communication '"f°rm_at'°" Design 7 Visual Branding Design mg. 0‘ - I - 9 uugojuflifl ihfluoglm ll ””— #”"'
  30. 30. Design Information Research Architecture U5.abi“t_Y Interaction Engineering Design . tilt‘-ui Human , ,. ,s“"“ a| ‘* Factors ‘Design 9'; i l in 2 —i% A l — ‘ii . i s , Content Se, -Vice Management o', >"_"” Design 'I'”9EflI-Ill Technical . Communication 'nf°"m_at'°” Design Visual Branding Design
  31. 31. Design Information Design Information Research Architecture Research Architecture U5_3b“It_Y Interaction ”§abi"’{il Interaction Engineering Design Engineering Design ‘. i‘| l!| . ui“'l£l Huma” Di’! Industrial ii Human , §, ;‘¢i"‘n Industrial $5’ ‘ Design Facmrs ‘ Design ‘ 2 g 2 I yr 2 i . l p; E * ‘M i ‘ii! 97 ‘ 97 Content D service Content D i a Management * "oer Design Management ’o; ,'_ 0. '0. ""953!-nu ”1;iil-ni Technical _ Technical . Communication I"f3""_a"°" Communication 'nf3r"1at'°" esign esign _ 7 Visual _ Visual Branding Design Branding Design ‘-v - - u-M‘ ”'
  32. 32. We're All UX: Designing a Whole Company Design Team ' xi Upslairi at Ru De Jean "Creating and growing a product design and UX practice in an organization needs to start with a deeper, strategic understanding of what is required. This requires research, especially into the environment and the people in it. Discovering the full range of issues is key to how well the conditions are handled and people are enabled. This session will discuss three of the most imponant frames of reference for discovery, planning, and fulfilling a UX team growth plan: Context. Capabilities. and Culture. Assessment of these within your organization will provide insights about advantages. liabilities. strengths. and weaknesses that are often not immediately visible. From there you will be able to make choices about plans, priorities, and systemic approaches that are most appropriate for your situation. These plans will enable you to foster the interpersonal environments and interactions that create the opportunity for a strong UX practice to emerge and flourish. " Phillip Hunter ii: tic~m. .«iiiimia
  33. 33. Understanding the strategic context of what and why: What do we need to get done? Why? How much?
  34. 34. What do we need to be good at? How good? What are the priorities?
  35. 35. What and why? Who and how much? How and when?
  36. 36. Design Information Research Architecture U5_abI“t, Y Interaction Engineering Design . ,c'7“""I Human I .35? Industrial I‘ Factors ¢~‘ Design ea i I fit ti _ . . .3 / Content cg)’ Service 5 Management ‘ 0%" Design l'"'Pe‘flhI| Technical ’ f _ Communication In Srm. at'°" esrgn Visual Branding Design
  37. 37. aesthetics: type, color, line, shape, sound asset creation Motion principle/ guideline creation, compliance, validation global design branding compliance creative direction brand strategy for visual identity frameworks for visual design language brand/ product positioning layout & composition information architecture content design interaction design NUI and multimodal navigation and command universal design ml channel design cross-product design conceptual design & modeling Persona development exploration of design options question definition relevant outcomes and necessary data methodology selection and tradeoffs emergent methods method development data analysis report w communication and catalyst for action data synthesis latent need identification insight triangulation storytelling sketching prototyping techn modeling Iteration generation and refinement creative production prob| em—solving use and create team processes and methodologies mee and metrics competitive differentiation process contribution and improvement tool contribution and improvement integration with team p and tools continuous iterative improvement insight generation product design service design effective meetings stakeholder selection and management managing interpersonal style differences working across organizational boundaries transparency communication strategy tean dynamics role model coaching succession planning pride in work personal accountability abstraction from personal experience engineering mechanisms identify issues resolve, escalate, or find owners for issues describe discoveries from behavior or observation identify latent neec new product/ service priorities integrate expected new usage patterns address experience and behavioral attributes address attitude and emc attributes describe opportunities relative to competition / trends identify opportunities relative to competition / trends create action plan relat immediate needs create action plan consistent with future needs contribute to product strategy contribute to cross-product or cross-org strate employ divergent thinking to influence engineering peers apply work across engineering lifecycle contribute to go—to—market campaigns and messaging develop formative, generative, naturalistic research propose and create consensus for needed human and product centered approi define success criteria and needed deliverables against multiple research objectives innovate new research approaches formulate systematic r stage approach adapt research program to respond to organizational need reduce data to form actionable outcomes enable problem identifii apply data to idea finding, problem finding, and problem definition synthesize data for idea finding, problem finding, and problem definition < compelling data summaries deliver compelling research artifacts create compelling communication via emotional connection to user and cont convey real user stories create common understanding of usage, reaction, feedback, or needs predict usage and customer reaction contribute customer stories, insights, and data for go to market efforts inspire new thinking by leveraging expressed needs inspire new thinking by levera latent needs propose and guide solutions throughout cycle apply appropriate business domain knowledge define measurable conditions for create measurable conditions for success build consensus for success definitions align success definitions to goals or org definitions create alig success definitions to goals or org definitions integrate success definitions into design research process create integration of success definitior design research process leverage insight on needs to inspire new thinking and approaches create insight on needs to inspire new thinking anc approaches propose and guide solutions align solutions within or across product areas / scenarios create alignment of solutions across produi scenarios discover and understand root causes to experience issues iterate analyses and interpretation of data to discover superior solutions < direct analyses and interpretation of data to discover superior solutions tune designs based on continuous iteration tune research approaches address chanaina needs provide data and research artifacts that validate success outcomes create and direct research processes to provide da
  38. 38. Facilitation skills Comfort with complex design solutions Ideation skills Healthcare domain knowledge Research skills Mobile design experience Visual design skills Works well with others
  39. 39. Skill Name Skill 1 Color, line, shape Skill 2 Latent need identification Brand integration Skill 3 Skill 4 liiif) / "v. ':v/ s ri«—sl7;ar—'3 rrt M l = l‘i. r‘t ‘an i‘L. ll<ll'ii’ F ‘. ‘.>“: l«= wan‘: :2 K to 2v‘ Business model translation Phillip Hunter
  40. 40. Skill Name Desired Level Priority Color, line, shape Latent need identification Brand integration Phillip Hunter hffr‘>'/ /wv/ v./ shrieslmre net’ '7: l: l"Lii‘ir’? l’/ i7l. llCll'i( —:2—xt*nl<> row niw LIX Tf‘a'ili7
  41. 41. Scale 1 to 5 with 5 being high or important Skill Name Current Level Desired Level Latent need identification Brand integration Phillip Hunter hffr‘>'/ /wv/ v./ shrieslmre net’ '7: l: f‘imfeér/ fii. ilCii'ir —;2—xt‘nl<> row niw LIX Tf‘a'ili7
  42. 42. :ed identification riangulation n9 ling techniques on and refinement production -solving create team processes and methodologie ___a ___r _. n_: __ 1. _ ur- _ team A team B company average Phillip Hunter , ,, :: Phi, i;7lw: r<>r1r>Ni, '19 «i / l,1:> f""°IIif‘. {‘! ‘,)’-“*£; i"«*lii
  43. 43. Design Information Research Architecture U5_abl“t, Y Interaction Engineering Design . ,c'7“""l Human I .35? Industrial I‘ Factors as‘ Design ea l I fit if _ . . .3 / Content cg)’ Service l Management ‘ 0%" Design l'"'Pe‘flhI| i Technical ’ f _ Communication In Srm. at'°" esign Visual Branding Design
  44. 44. ied identification riangulation n9 ling techniques on and refinement production -solving create team processes and methodologie ___a ___J _. n_: __ 1. _ i. rr- _ team A team B company average Phillip Hunter , ,, :: Phi, i;7lw: r<>r1r>Ni, '19 «i / l,i: > <= -rnziiiii‘i‘, >’-H>eJrwii
  45. 45. Understanding the strategic context of what and why: What do we need to get done? Why? How much?
  46. 46. What do we need to be good at? How good? What are the priorities?
  47. 47. ., fr0. ,
  48. 48. Hiring is hard.
  49. 49. D Search pI'O]eClS Discover Start Unicorn Institute: Courses to shape the future of UX design by Jared Spool and Dr. Leslie Jensen-lnman Home Updatesa Backersm Comments“ 9 Chattanooga, TN 0 Design Funded! This project was successfully funded on February 22, 2014. NICORNG D PLAY INST TE Courses to shape the 1 ,53O Backers $133,767 pledged of $21,700 goal 0 seconds to 90 Project by , Jared Spool and Dr. I, Leslie Jensen-Inman .117 mmmmmm
  50. 50. AC1C]k. fl-ffifrlflil ‘-2’
  51. 51. Veruca Salt: Mr. Salt: Veruca Salt: Mr. Salt: Veruca Salt: Daddy, I want a squirrel. Get me one of those squirrels, I want one! Veruca dear, you have many marvelous pets. All I've got at home is one pony and two dogs and four cats and six bunny rabbits and two pamkeets and three canaries and a green parrot and a turtle, and a silly old hamster! I WANT a SOUIRREL! All right, pet. Daddy'll get you a squirrel just as soon as he possibly can. But I don't want any old squirrel! I want a *trained* squirrel!
  52. 52. ‘: -Cl'riii"$. lCf'(CIi‘; T3,’
  53. 53. . your contractors
  54. 54. Who does it already?
  55. 55. Hire.
  56. 56. Design Information Research Architecture E U5f‘blll"Y Interaction H In T ' _ 9 eemg °°"9" -'ll(1ll N*= _lul= ‘ : I.| u=r ii Eta. -niu-il “ ‘ L. =w= :l l_. =w= :l _‘¢‘till-lei V . ; £9” '“d“5f'l3! r, ‘rlolton. hula It 3, it . ~_$ ‘ Design i — i E , , _ _ _ V E Tl; A V‘ v l‘, ;', “ ' j nereaol A A I l i ‘ _ Comm .9 Service 5; j ko. t—I: IIIItur: .Ii'lonm ""‘"’9°"“*”‘ °"~ °°5‘9" A ‘ : im. ..i : . :4 : < ’!9ern. ;.. } ’ l lnl“(= r2_g‘| I=. I'ituni Technical j l , , U Communicafion Information l. .[. I(Il‘Vjr. f'I‘: I Al 3 Design 1 '1’ Visual Branding Design
  57. 57. Acquisition ‘V5.-. .., § your contractors Who does it already?
  58. 58. J
  59. 59. cadamian
  60. 60. Jared Spool: wttgr/ /www. uie. com/ articles/ assessing ux teams/ ‘ittp: //www. uie. com/ articles/ indispensable skills Liz Bacon: illp / //E, leVlS‘é‘COllSUlllHg. COl7i/ dE‘llHlliQ—UX/ Phillip Hunter: itt '/ // /NW. Sll(l€Sll<‘: rE net/ milli )hunter/ buildin —a—whole—corn an —u><—team Star Wars Wiki article on Jar-Kai: nttp / /starwars ‘. ’/ il<l£1 com/ wil<i/ Jar'Kai Other misc reading: iltp / /connectlrun"anlactors_coin/ profiles/ blogs/ ux—south—airica—5—tips—ior—building—a—ux— cl'eani—teain Ht / /us5 cam )rll( n—arr. n‘/ el . coin/ '?awes<>rne= no&u=7eO93c5cf4&id= cl‘e9dbcac8 tt / /www tzxrnatters rorn/ mt/ archives/ '20iO/ O2/enter rise—user—e>< erience—buildin —a—u><— groiighosting—a—get—to—l<now—u><—event. ghp#buildingU><Groug Images: wttp / /www. ttuigcoin/ casting_call/ clones/ inarching_LjQg wttp / /staiwa's. wil<ia com/ wil<i/ Clone trooper mp / /www postavycz/ obrazl< / qenera| —qrievous—290._j; ;g ttj’_1'/ /4.bgblogsgotcorn/ —Og 8GCDyl<gC/ UE—CUDLhlZl/ AAAAAAAABSY/ rMuDlUlgGl-lU/ sl600/willygif wttg/ /bingebehavior. com/ wgcontent/ Liploads/2013/O7/Unicorn. pg

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