...
Happiness" World Tour  
 numerical harmonics as all leading up to the design revolution that is the new Pepsi logo.

 This...
new packaging for its Goobers, Sno­Caps and Oh Henry! candy lines (the package redesign that gets 
     the most votes wil...
 




                                                                                                                    ...
MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does 
                                                                                     ...
What’s it like sharing the brand name with your family name? Is it a little weird? 
     Not really, because I’m just so u...
 

 




                                                                                                             
   ...
Most of the marketing and advertising initiatives that 
    have cropped up in recent years have revolved around 
    pack...
                             
     Jennifer Gidman uses OJ as a breakfast supplement every morning and as an 
     indispe...
 

 

                                          




                                                                     ...
To comparison shop, check out Hillary Clinton's website and John McCain's website as 
    well. Also, for a comprehensive ...
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio

45,578 views

Published on

Hi. Welcome to my SlideShare writing portfolio, which includes samples of:

• Interview- and research-focused feature writing for brandchannel.com (an online portal dedicated to branding) and the print and online versions of Studio Photography magazine (a B2B publication geared toward professional photographers)

• A custom advertorial series (targeted at professional wedding photographers) that I created for Nikon for 9 years

• A custom marketing e-newsletter I help create monthly for Tamron USA

• A travel photography series I put together for Tamron to appear on retail vendor Web sites

• Copywriting for ads/brochures for Interstate Lumber

• Blogs for ImagingInfo.com (a Web site for the professional photographer and photo retailer) and Inside-Voice.com (a parenting blog I co-founded)

• Ghostwriting I performed for a diet book by Boo Grace.

More samples are available on request. Please refer to my editing portfolio (coming soon!) for my editing, copyediting, and content management experience.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
45,578
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
27
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio

  1. 1.                 Search always branding. always on.   Latest News In Depth  Papers  Books  Brandcameo  Directory  Careers  Branding Glossary          You should register for our newsletter You should also:    follow us on Twitter,      add us on Facebook,   join us on LinkedIn,   subscribe to our RSS  and send us your story ideas at:   tips@brandchannel.com               elsewhere on brandchannel It’s a revamp­gone­wrong tale that has already secured  < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 > its place in the annals of packaging: PepsiCo retains  Arnell Group to redesign its Tropicana Pure Premium  orange juice cartons as part of its new ad campaign.     Said cartons make their aisle debut in January, minus     the familiar straw­punctured orange and sporting a        modernized depiction of—well, fresh­squeezed juice.  Consumers revolt and demand the old packaging  back. Two months and a reported US$ 35 million later,    PepsiCo reverts back to the original Tropicana  packaging, straw between its legs (and back on the  carton).  There’s nothing unusual about a perennial product  Will Windows 7 revive Microsoft's  Packaging Service Brands All Customers Are Irrational Jason Fry Tecnisa Construction Company Branding Airports Where The Wild Things Are Surprising Secret of Successful  Odwalla revisiting its packaging, labels or logos in an attempt to bring outdated aesthetics up to par with an  brand? Brands and employees must work  A marketing book about the human  An interview on how to grow a  Why this successful Brazilian  Why branding will take off with  A boy disappears into his  Differentiation Does this fruit drink and smoothie  enduring brand message. Camel cigarettes underwent its first package redesign in 90 years in 2008.  Join our debate on what brands  together to succeed in such a  subconscious and how it makes us  powerful brand in the routine  company is building both bonds and passengers, airports and the  imagination full of monsters, ideals,  Why effective differentiation means  brand have the right mix of  should and shouldn cluttered marketplace. behave. sunflower seed category. its brand. brands that travel with them. and Converse brandcameos. thinking beyond the core benefits of  ingredients online? ’t do when  Bacardi, which has been distilling spirits since the 1860s, has updated its bottles to “reflect the  reacting to shifts in public opinion. your product category. sophisticated consumer environment.” And then there’s Pepsi, which introduced a new logo last fall  (Arnell Group was also responsible for this design do­over, to mixed reviews).  most viewed posts Charmin To Staff NYC Restrooms  But if the brand is still enjoying hefty market share, why putter around with its packaging? Tropicana  With Bloggers For The Holidays   has historically dominated number­two Minute Maid (owned by PepsiCo rival Coca­Cola) in the OJ  category. “Sometimes [package redesign] has nothing to do with the business at all—it [comes] down  Phillies' Rise Mirrors Philly's Rise    to the new personnel working on the brand, hell­bent on making a mark on their career,” says Dyfed  MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  “Fred” Richards, executive creative director, North America, for global branding consultancy Interbrand, Retail   which also produces brandchannel. “It’s sometimes difficult for brand managers to demonstrate growth  of a brand they’re being tasked to manage and grow. But a new package design associated with those Martha Stewart Brands A Turkey   changes demonstrates these changes.” Cause Marketing Grows, But Is A  Backlash Ahead?   The agencies commissioned for a redesign may also share some of the blame for failed packaging  overhauls—think about if Mad Men creative director Don Draper’s powers of persuasion were magnified  by corporate fears of losing market share in a depressed economy. “Design companies should be  recent posts asking far smarter questions at the outset of the changes to really understand the reasons for the  Around The Web: Confirm Friend  change,” Richards says. “Sadly, many [of these] companies enjoy the design process so much that  Request  design for design’s sake takes over, and all reason jumps out of the window for the benefit of a trend or MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  effect they’ve wanted to try.”  Retail  Could this be what happened with the Arnell Group redesign strategy for the Pepsi logo that leaked  Martha Stewart Brands A Turkey  onto the Internet last year? In the 27­page report, simply titled “Breathtaking,” the authors cite such  Phillies' Rise Mirrors Philly's Rise   lofty influences as the golden rectangle (that aesthetically pleasing formula found in architectural and  artistic masterpieces like the Mona Lisa and the Parthenon); magnetic geodynamics; and Hindu  Coke Sends Bloggers On An "Open  Happiness" World Tour   numerical harmonics as all leading up to the design revolution that is the new Pepsi logo. This is excessive profundity for a visual representation that, at the risk of oversimplifying the process,    just took the old logo, rotated it and distorted the white middle wave. And while there ’s plenty in the  Will Starbuck's Via instant coffee  undermine the brand? report about brand geometry, perimeter oscillations and color theory, what’s notable is a lack of  discussion of either the product itself or the consumer. j k l m n No Arnell Group still hasn’t verified the report as being authentic. However, Peter Arnell’s somewhat 
  2. 2. Happiness" World Tour   numerical harmonics as all leading up to the design revolution that is the new Pepsi logo. This is excessive profundity for a visual representation that, at the risk of oversimplifying the process,    just took the old logo, rotated it and distorted the white middle wave. And while there ’s plenty in the  Will Starbuck's Via instant coffee  undermine the brand? report about brand geometry, perimeter oscillations and color theory, what’s notable is a lack of  discussion of either the product itself or the consumer. j k l m n No Arnell Group still hasn’t verified the report as being authentic. However, Peter Arnell’s somewhat  j k l m n rambling defense of the Tropicana debacle is comprised of similar stream­of­consciousness  Yes associations between squeezing oranges, hugging children, and ensuring consistency between the    purity of the juice and the carton. Combine this with the grammatically awkward tagline,  “Squeeze… VOTE     It’s a Natural,” and you’re left to wonder: is this branding genius or simply marketing mumbo­jumbo?  Show Results Extreme Package Makeover Polls Archive  With properly ascertained research and consumer feedback, however, a brand can, and should, make  an informed decision to redesign its packaging or logo. “Any brand should be looking at itself in the  mirror 24/7 and measuring itself against all its competitors,” Richards says. “If a brand is in a  leadership position, then it should be protecting and leveraging those key equities at all times in an  effort to reinforce the reasons why it’s the market leader.”  All parties involved need to carefully tread the redesign waters. “Understand the brand’s history,”  Richards explains. “Talk to and listen to loyal consumers. This isn’t about sticking a pretty label on a  box and hoping you win a design award. All the assets of the brand need careful evaluation to find out  equity stretch points and equities that are sacrosanct to the consumer. More often than not, you’re not designing for your client, and certainly not for yourself—you’re designing for the consumer.”  Even after studying the ins and outs of a brand, there’s still that slippery slope to navigate in  contemporizing an iconic brand’s packaging, label or logo while still retaining its most identifiable  elements and the equity it’s built up over the years. “There’s a fine line between being relevant and  being trendy,” Richards explains. “Updating requires a craft that can only be learned over many years  of experience. I always tell my designers that working on the less glamorous brands is character ­ building [work], not on the boutique brands that essentially come and go and fall prey to the latest  tricks and trends.”  While designers should be aware of the new designs around them, they should be careful of what they  leverage in their day­to­day dealings with brands they are charged to develop, Richards says. “I ask all  of my designers to keep personal scrapbooks that are evaluated on a regular basis in one­on­one  sessions,” he says. “I want to see what’s motivating them, what inspires them. It could be a ticket  stub from a concert or a great piece of type from an ad—it doesn’t matter, as long as they are curious  [about] the world around them and download the information in a book rather than carrying this  information as graphic noise in their heads. That noise might then become an impure insert into a  brand’s future that won’t resonate with the consumer.”   Pulp Friction   Tropicana’s carton conundrum is a compelling story on a couple of fronts. First, there’s the juicy,  schadenfreude­esque media obsession—the panned carton was one of the most blogged topics the  week of February 23–27, behind only the machinations of President Obama’s new administration,  according to the Project for Excellence in Journalism’s New Media Index. But even more unusual has been the astonishing backlash from a usually silent, brand­loyal  contingent, and PepsiCo’s eventual acquiescence to these vitamin C devotees. Feedback on the  design, relayed to PepsiCo via letters, phone calls and e­mails, has ranged from deeming the cartons  “ugly” to expressing outright confusion—some customers passed right by Tropicana cartons on store  shelves, mistaking the new packaging for private­label offerings. “What’s evident from my experience  and perspective is that key equities of the brand were thrown away for a generic offering, and  consumers reacted,” Richards says.  Despite such a marketing blunder, however, Tropicana­gate has demonstrated that the brand’s  followers cared enough about the brand to effect change. “I think it’s a blessing for Pepsi that the  consumers didn’t react by walking away from the brand,” Richards says. “We all remember what  happened with New Coke.”  In these troubling economic times, this type of loyalty is an indicator of what roles brands play in our  lives. “The rise of private label is clear (64 percent last year), and orange juice is a commodity  category,” Richards says. “But consumers need their ‘comfort brands’—eventually the message [of  these comfort brands] will get through, and consumers become incredibly powerful brand advocates.  So when the message changes in such a dramatic fashion, as it did with Tropicana, the consumer  feels betrayed.”  Revolution among the common folk is starting to resonate with the brands they’re revolting against.  Facebook users, for instance, recently took issue with certain amendments to the site’s terms of  service. As a result, the social­networking platform temporarily reverted back to its old terms. And  when CBS canceled the prime­time TV show Jericho, disgruntled fans delivered 20 tons of peanuts to  CBS offices (the network cracked and resurrected the show). There are brands that have taken consumer opinion one step further, involving the public in actual    packaging makeovers. Nestlé, for example, is tapping into social media to elicit consumer input for  new packaging for its Goobers, Sno­Caps and Oh Henry! candy lines (the package redesign that gets  the most votes will be on shelves by the end of 2009). And in celebration of its 150th anniversary,  Eight O’Clock Coffee is letting consumers direct its packaging facelift by registering their votes at  CoffeeMaker.com (with a chance to win a year’s worth of groceries to boot).  Of course, there’s empowering consumers with some say, and then there’s giving the consumers a  laptop loaded with graphic­design software and directing them to redesign the packaging from scratch.
  3. 3. new packaging for its Goobers, Sno­Caps and Oh Henry! candy lines (the package redesign that gets  the most votes will be on shelves by the end of 2009). And in celebration of its 150th anniversary,  Eight O’Clock Coffee is letting consumers direct its packaging facelift by registering their votes at  CoffeeMaker.com (with a chance to win a year’s worth of groceries to boot).  Of course, there’s empowering consumers with some say, and then there’s giving the consumers a  laptop loaded with graphic­design software and directing them to redesign the packaging from scratch. “I’m a firm believer in engaging consumers at every level of the design process,” Richards says.  “Listen to them first, show them what they know, listen again. Then think about what you’ve heard— put images to the spoken word and play them back. Ensure there’s a clear meaning behind every  image and every word. Go on a shopping trip with the consumer from the moment the grocery list is  being created to the point of selection at shelf to purchase to use in the home; do the same thing  yourself. But don’t let the client or consumer design: brand design is a craft, not a beauty contest.”  So it’s back to the drawing board (or maybe not) for Tropicana. The old cartons are expected to  reappear on store shelves this month. The only remnants of the US$ 35 million Arnell experiment will  be the cute, orange­shaped plastic caps, which will be retained on cartons of low­calorie Trop50. The  advertising campaign that’s currently in place will also continue.  Perhaps this could have all been avoided if PepsiCo had sought out real consumer input in the first  place. “Respect the brand and the role it has to play in the hearts and minds of the consumer,”  Richards says. “Use the product: How does it taste, smell, sound, feel in your hands—how does it  perform? Do you understand it? Can you appreciate why other consumers get excited by it? Go on  that consumer journey.”  Once you’ve taken that step, you’ll be able to embark on a successful packaging redesign if that’s  what’s needed. “Many brands successfully update their look and feel on a regular basis with very little  effect on the loyal consumer—that’s the craft of branding,” Richards says. “When you go back and  look at packaging through the ages, especially the power brands that have stood the test of time  through decades of changes and consumer trends, they offer a unique insight of how to develop and  manage key equities and remain relevant to the consumer of today and tomorrow.”       [16­Mar­2009]      Jennifer Gidman lives and works in New York.     Other articles by this author          commenting closed   bookmark   print   suggest topic   recommend ( 91 )   email    Packaging: Lessons from Tropicana’s Fruitless Design        It's amazing to see so many examples such as this, especially considering the money and  reputations involved.One thing I tend to notice is missing is 'end benefit'... TO THE CONSUMER.I am of  course an advocate, so I would say this, but it also seems a pity more thought in these redesigns is not  given to environmental benefits, especially in the area of reuse, which surely can offer END BENEFIT to  person, pocket, planet and.. if marketed well, the product too!And I can think of many that could well  confer significant advantages in this regard, whilst representing an evolution that will satisfy the desire to  stay 'fresh', but without needing to confuse loyal customers by being too radical. Or not working (I hark to the Wal*Mart large bottle 'green' design; which was more to help the logistics than at the breakfast  table... think 'end benefit' again... where was it?) The will is there, the money is there. The imaginations  are there. Wouldn't it be great if the brief was posed?    Peter Martin, Junkk Male, Junkk.com ­ March 16, 2009     Excellent article. Thank you so much Jennifer!It's always the same old story with leading brands.  Evolution or revolution?Research is very very weak for this kind of projects, we are using the same tools  for the last 25 years and definitely the world (the consumer) has changed...All this shouldn't last; but it  will, always...said Prince of Lampedusa.    Jordi Aguilar, Strategy Director, Morillas Brand Design ­ March 16, 2009     Jennifer, Well put! I agree with your conclusion "Perhaps this could have all been avoided if PepsiCo  had sought out real consumer input in the first place." However, while graphic design firms may be the  easiest target for such criticism, they are not alone. Brand consultants, ad agencies and PR firms are all guilty of the same sins whenever their practitioners focus so much on the client, their peers or their ego  that the consumer becomes a trifling afterthought. Thanks for the post. I will encourage my clients and  employees to read this.    Sean Duffy, Brand Consultant, The Duffy Agency ­ March 16, 2009     Funny, I actually sent Tropicana an email about two weeks ago commenting on the new packaging. I  alerted them that it made it difficult for me (a branding professional) to identify my favorite variety (Light  Jeff Gonzalez, Just a Brand Conscious Guy, Freelance Web Marketing ­ March 16, 2009     Thanks for the thorough follow­up and insights on brand management and "consumers as design  critics." I followed this makeover discussion with great interest and was glad to see Tropicana responded by listening to its core customers. But I do worry about the trend of asking consumers to "be the  designer." The pendulum has swung away from respect for the design craft to allowing consumers to  completely run the show. There needs to be a happy medium between consumer input and thoughtful,  meaningful design choices. Tropicana got lucky and learned a bit about redesigning a customer 
  4. 4.                 Search always branding. always on.   Latest News In Depth  Papers  Books  Brandcameo  Directory  Careers  Branding Glossary     Tim Zagat  full of opinions  by Jennifer Gidman   You should register for our newsletter March 2, 2009 issue   “Power to the people.” Few brands deliver on that  You should also:   slogan like Zagat Survey, which has been compiling   follow us on Twitter,    user opinions of restaurants and other shopping, hotel  add us on Facebook,  and entertainment venues and publishing the results   join us on LinkedIn,  in popular annual guides for 30 years.   subscribe to our RSS  What Tim Zagat and his wife, Nina, began as a hobby and send us your story ideas at:   is now a portable vox populi with a now­familiar 30­ tips@brandchannel.com   point rating scale for dining and entertainment venues. Tim told us how the Zagat Survey (“the ultimate    elsewhere on brandchannel source on where to ‘Eat, Drink, Stay and Play’”) has  evolved, what makes it an enduring brand, and how he < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 > and his wife still play an integral role in the brand that  bears their name.   It’s your namesake—so how would you define     the Zagat Survey brand? The key factors defining the brand are that the guides    are up to date, fun to read and trustworthy—by being    consistently accurate and fair. There’s a sense that  the guides’ information comes from savvy people who  are, hopefully, like you, and who can share their  experiences to help you make smart decisions.   Packaging Service Brands All Customers Are Irrational Jason Fry Tecnisa Construction Company Branding Airports Where The Wild Things Are Surprising Secret of Successful  Odwalla Will Windows 7 revive Microsoft's  Brands and employees must work  A marketing book about the human  An interview on how to grow a  Why this successful Brazilian  Why branding will take off with  A boy disappears into his  Differentiation Does this fruit drink and smoothie  brand?   Walk us through the Zagat voting process.   together to succeed in such a  subconscious and how it makes us  powerful brand in the routine  company is building both bonds and passengers, airports and the  imagination full of monsters, ideals,  Why effective differentiation means  brand have the right mix of  Join our debate on what brands  cluttered marketplace. behave. sunflower seed category. its brand. brands that travel with them. and Converse brandcameos. thinking beyond the core benefits of  ingredients online? should and shouldn ’t do when  People are asked to vote on food, décor, service and cost for restaurants, and then to comment on  your product category. reacting to shifts in public opinion. the overall dining experience. After these votes are submitted, they are read by our editors (we have  about 50 of them), who synopsize what all the people say. The comments are edited with the goal of  most viewed posts being as fair a synopsis as possible. The numeric ratings you see are simply an average score based MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  on all the collected responses. Retail   Our goal at Zagat is not to create a paradigm of what a great restaurant or store or spa is. Many  Coke Sends Bloggers On An "Open  people want to tell you what they think is the best restaurant or hotel—to create their own  Happiness" World Tour    paradigm—not what you need to know. Our goal is to help you intelligently decide what you want to  Martha Stewart Brands A Turkey   do and where you want to go. Obamas Give J Crew Some Change  You need different things to satisfy your needs from day to day, from a quick late­night dinner nearby  They Can Believe In   with your spouse to entertaining a sophisticated business client. The brand’s goal is to facilitate you  Phillies' Rise Mirrors Philly's Rise    making smart decisions to serve your best interests. If you go to a restaurant that’s a “28/28/28” in  our book, however, you probably are going to a restaurant that gets three stars in the Michelin Guide. recent posts Has the voting system ever been compromised? Any other challenges in maintaining brand  Citizens And Capital One Bank On  integrity? Starbucks And Dunkin' Donuts  If we’re not accurate and fair, it’s pretty easy for people to figure it out. Our whole business and all  Awkward Timing For Tom Ford's  our credibility depends on the quality of the reviews we write. Return To Womenswear  Read the reviews of restaurants that you frequent most. Ask yourself whether they’re accurate. If so,  Headline Roundup: Android Army  you conclude that the system—the brand—works. If not, you ought to throw the book out. Our New  Around The Web: Confirm Friend  York City restaurant guide, though, has probably been the best ­selling book of any kind in NYC for  Request  the last ten years, which I think says something about our reliability. MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  Retail  If there are large numbers of people going to a restaurant or hotel before you, it’s hard for us to make  a mistake after we’ve read all the comments before we write a synopsis. That’s true even if people  disagree. Let’s say a place is a real hot spot: a 20­year­old will say, “Lively and exciting”; his parents   Will Starbuck's Via instant coffee  may say, “Crowded and noisy.” You get those results fairly often, but both viewpoints are useful.  undermine the brand? So some of the restaurants have been upset about their ratings? j k l m n No Relatively few. When someone has a factual issue, we’ll try to correct it as quickly as possible, 
  5. 5. MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  Retail  If there are large numbers of people going to a restaurant or hotel before you, it’s hard for us to make  a mistake after we’ve read all the comments before we write a synopsis. That’s true even if people  disagree. Let’s say a place is a real hot spot: a 20­year­old will say, “Lively and exciting”; his parents   Will Starbuck's Via instant coffee  may say, “Crowded and noisy.” You get those results fairly often, but both viewpoints are useful.  undermine the brand? So some of the restaurants have been upset about their ratings? j k l m n No Relatively few. When someone has a factual issue, we’ll try to correct it as quickly as possible,  because we’re covering 40,000 restaurants, and we want to make sure the guide is factually correct.  j k l m n If it’s a matter of opinion, however, we don’t make changes.  Yes To be honest, most restaurateurs like what we do much more than they like one critic coming in.  VOTE     After all, a critic’s job is to be critical. The regular people who submit reviews to our guides generally  Show Results are going out to have a good time, so, by and large, their reviews are more positive. If the guides have a fault, it may be they’re too nice.  Polls Archive  Do you think the Zagat guides have helped consumers receive better service? After all, a  restaurant must now treat every customer as if he or she is rating it. Ruth Reichl, then the New York Times restaurant critic, visited Le Cirque two nights in a row: the first in disguise, the second as her recognizable self. She then contrasted the service she received those  nights, concluding that the Dubuque tourist visiting a Manhattan restaurant won’t eat as well as the  urbane regular. Frankly, we believe (we hope) that we’re influencing the restaurants for the better, in that way and in  one other way: we try to get the restaurants to understand they are getting a free market review from  their customers. Every time a restaurant owner looks at a review, it’s his customers who are rating  his restaurant and reviewing them. What if your restaurant gets a 23 for food and a 16 for service— what does that tell you? It tells you that the same people who raved about the food don’t think the  service is as good. If the restaurant cares about what its customers think, it ought to be spending  some time trying to work on its service. We’ve also given the consumer a sense of empowerment they didn’t have 30 years ago. Back then,  there were a few great “expert” restaurant critics, and the rest of us had to keep quiet.  Talk about your brand extensions. You started out with restaurant guides and then moved  on to other ratings. We do surveys for hotels, resorts, nightlife, movies and shopping, which we do in 25 cities. We even  do two kinds of shopping in NY: one features gourmet food and entertaining, and the other focuses on retail. We do a nightlife survey in 25 cities—our older son had once told us that he felt his friends  went out to drink more than they eat, so we figured that was a good direction to go in. Of course, I  always hoped his metabolism would revert back to eating instead of drinking. We haven’t done many brand partnerships, however. I’m old­fashioned: I think we should just do what we do as well as possible and not try to confuse the brand by getting involved in things that people  don’t think is our natural territory.  How do you decide where to open a guide? We have people who spend time thinking about those things—I have a tendency of wanting to try  things, and if they work, they work, if they don’t, they don’t. So far we’ve had a good track record of  them working! We’ll have more focused guides to complement the main guide. For instance, we have a San  Francisco guide, with a smaller guide for Napa and Sonoma. And here in New York, for example,  we’re reaching out to support the city of Newark —they have a wonderful new mayor, and that’s part  of why we’re doing it. We have a guide for Brooklyn and for Staten Island, even though they’re all  technically part of New York City. We did a guide for lower Manhattan after 9/11 that was designed to bring back business to downtown. Where do you see the Zagat brand moving in the next decade or so? We just did three cities in China, and we’re talking to people in a number of foreign countries about  expanding into those. China has about 50 or 60 cities with more than the population of Chicago, and  we’re not going to be able to do it by ourselves, so we’re trying to get somebody to work with us in  China under our supervision. How are you and your wife, Nina, still involved in the day­to­day operations of the brand? We’re fully involved. We do different things—I tend to work more on the creative, editorial side and  [am] somewhat more media­oriented. She’s very articulate and smarter than I am in a lot of ways (we met in law school, so we’ve been at it for a long time). She’s more involved in the day­to­day running  of the business. But if there’s a serious issue or big discussion, we’ll both get involved.  Sometimes we’ll argue about issues—but one of the best things about arguing with someone who’s a part of your family is that we have the same ultimate goal: we want the guide to be the best possible  guide there is. There are no politics involved in disagreeing. If she says one thing, and I say another,  at least we both know we’re trying to get to the same place. There are no separate agendas—it’s just a difference of opinion, which is sometimes very useful.  What’s it like sharing the brand name with your family name? Is it a little weird?  Not really, because I’m just so used to it. It seems perfectly natural. I didn’t even know what a brand  was when we started—people started telling me 20 years ago that I was a brand, and I would say,  “What’s a brand?”  How do you pronounce “Zagat,” anyway? Has the continual mispronunciation of the name  affected the brand in any way? It’s “Za­GAT like the cat in a hat, and that’s that!” It hasn’t really affected our success one way or the 
  6. 6. What’s it like sharing the brand name with your family name? Is it a little weird?  Not really, because I’m just so used to it. It seems perfectly natural. I didn’t even know what a brand  was when we started—people started telling me 20 years ago that I was a brand, and I would say,  “What’s a brand?”  How do you pronounce “Zagat,” anyway? Has the continual mispronunciation of the name  affected the brand in any way? It’s “Za­GAT like the cat in a hat, and that’s that!” It hasn’t really affected our success one way or the  other. It’s an unusual name—no one else in the whole country has it. It happens to have a nice five  letters—it’s a neat name for a brand. If our name was “Schnitzerbocker,” you’d have to turn the guide  on its side to fit it all in. So, since you’re based in Manhattan, what’s your favorite restaurant? Will we catch you at  Gray’s Papaya, the New York City hotdog institution?  You will see me there, but you’ll also find me at a lot of other places. I like to go to different  restaurants on different nights. I probably wouldn’t want to go to my favorite French restaurant every  day—my liver would likely explode. Some nights I’m in the mood for Chinese, sometimes Italian.  But restaurants I like aren’t the point of the Zagat brand. Whose opinion would you rather base your  decision on: 38,000 people’s, or Tim Zagat’s? We run the voting machine and the election system;  we don’t believe you should have a candidate in the race run the election. You have to be objective,  unbiased, neutral. Pushing restaurants we like on everyone else would be contrary to everything we  stand for. When you do that, you’re saying that one person’s voice is better than any other’s.        Jennifer Gidman lives and works in New York.  Other articles by this author     commenting closed   bookmark   print   suggest topic   recommend ( 149 )   email    Tim Zagat ­ full of opinions        I juts got my Zagat dating and dumping guide and I LOVE IT!    Joe ­ March 16, 2009        2009  |  2008  |  2007  |  2006  |  2005  |  2004  |  2003  |  2002  |   brandchannel careers archive   2001      Oct 9, 2009  Jason Fry ­ cooking up a brand ­­ Abram Sauer        Jason Fry grows branding power in sunflower seeds.                Aug 31, 2009  Herman Mashaba ­ just being himself ­­ Mandy de Waal        How Herman Mashaba built an African megabrand.                Aug 3, 2009  Jose Eduardo Costas ­ jet setter ­­ Preeti Khicha        The sky is the limit for Jose Costas.                Jul 6, 2009  Dan Aykroyd ­ wines and laughs ­­ Reneé Alexander        Dan Aykroyd uncorks his wine brand.                Jun 1, 2009  Lee Zalben ­ spreading his brand around ­­ Anthony Zumpano        Peanut Butter & Co. sticks to brand values.                May 4, 2009  Renzo Rosso ­ the engine behind diesel ­­ Slaven Marinovic        Diesel—one leg at a time.                Mar 30, 2009  Margie Bailly ­ branding behind the scenes ­­ Abram Sauer        A cool focus on a cold brand.                Feb 2, 2009  Mohan Sivanand ­ has lots to digest ­­ Preeti Khicha        The story behind the editor of Reader’s Digest India.                Jan 5, 2009  Gerry Dee ­ stands up ­­ Reneé Alexander        The serious business of comedy brands.                RSS   | Privacy Policy | About Us | Contact Us | FAQ  Copyright  ©  2001­2009 brandchannel. All rights reserved.  
  7. 7.                              Founded in 1869 by Henry John Heinz, the Heinz brand rules the     ketchup market (registered sales reached US$ 267.1 million in 2005)  and has achieved a 60 percent share of the category. ConAgra,     maker of second­place Hunt’s ketchup, trailed behind with a 16     percent share during the same period, while Del Monte barely made     a blip with 5.3 percent—falling even behind private­label brands  which had a 17 percent share. The Heinz name has achieved iconic status and become one of  those rare brands that single­handedly drive a category. A study  done on the brand in 2005 by The New England Consulting Group    estimated the lifetime brand value for Heinz at more than US$ 20  billion. Heinz ranked first in a 2008 overall brand equity study from  EquiTrend, which evaluated more than 1,000 brands across 39  categories. "I do think Heinz does have a quality product,” says Andrew F.  Smith, author of Pure Ketchup: A History of America's National  Condiment. “It's very sticky; I don't like ketchup that drips off a French fry. Their  ketchup is slow, which is what their commercials promoted in the 1960s and 1970s. It  has a high viscosity, so it sticks to whatever you put it on —if you bite into a hamburger  or hot dog, it doesn’t squish out the other end. People see that quality and have brand  loyalty. It's a great story not many commercial products have.”   Most consumers rely on trusty Heinz 57 to perk up their hamburger patties, but who is  buying the number­two and number­three brands? And why? “It’s mainly price,” says  Smith. “The Hunt's and Del Monte varieties have a lower price point than Heinz." The  Packaged Facts report backs up his assertion: people with household incomes greater  than US$ 100,000 are more likely to use Heinz, while Hunt's is the most often ­used  ketchup brand in households with incomes less than US$ 20,000. Viscous Visibility So, with such one­sided dominance in the category, what type of marketing is  necessary for the top brand, as well as for its distant competitors? "When you're controlling 60 percent of the market, why innovate?" laughs Smith. “Heinz  controls the commercial ketchup market in ways that no one else can compete with.  Once you get to that point, it doesn't matter if Del Monte and Hunt's advertise their  ketchups—Heinz sales actually go up when they do that!"  Most of the marketing and advertising initiatives that  have cropped up in recent years have revolved around  packaging innovations. In 2002, Heinz and ConAgra both  launched their inverted squeeze ketchup bottles—the  Heinz Easy Squeeze and Hunt's Perfect Squeeze—in the  same week. Heinz continued pioneering in packaging with its Top­ Down and Fridge Door Fit bottles. They reached out to 
  8. 8. Most of the marketing and advertising initiatives that  have cropped up in recent years have revolved around  packaging innovations. In 2002, Heinz and ConAgra both  launched their inverted squeeze ketchup bottles—the  Heinz Easy Squeeze and Hunt's Perfect Squeeze—in the  same week. Heinz continued pioneering in packaging with its Top­ Down and Fridge Door Fit bottles. They reached out to  younger consumers as well, with Silly Squirts bottles,  designed with different nozzles to let little hands create  their own dinnertime concoctions. The company also    launched a “Create­A­Label” campaign where consumers  could visit Heinz.com to create customized messages, as  well as the "Top This” TV challenge that allowed users to  compete to create the next Heinz TV commercial. Hunt’s has tried to keep up in the bottle wars by jumping on the green bandwagon: its  46­ounce bottle recently won an Institute of Packaging Professionals’ sustainable  packaging award for its DiamondClear PET construction, which Hunt’s claims makes the  bottle 12 percent lighter and more environmentally friendly than Heinz bottles of the  same size. Other recent ConAgra promotions designed to gain visibility for the brand have included  its role as an exclusive food sponsor for Six Flags, Inc., which put Hunt’s ketchup front  and center on every theme­park fast­food platter to enhance brand loyalty and reach  out to consumers beyond traditional media. The Hunt’s brand also took the unusual step  of offering "taste guarantee certificates " to consumers: anyone not satisfied with the  brand’s new, thicker ketchup can opt for a full cash refund or swap the certificates for a US$ 20 discount on other ConAgra product purchases. Sticky Situations Ketchup’s reputation as the untouchable topper, however, has not gone unchallenged.  There was the "salsa scare,"which, depending on which report you’re reading, has seen  salsa and ketchup alternate as the number­one condiment in the US. The nature of the product itself has seen little change over the years, and ketchup  continues to tickle the palate by appealing to all five of the basic taste receptors on the tongue: salty, sweet, sour, bitter and umami—a savory sensation triggered by glutamic  amino acid.  With the exception of Heinz’s ill­fated colored ketchups that didn’t quite catch on with    the kid demographic, as well as a Hot & Spicy Heinz ketchup that hasn’t given the  brand the extra kick that was expected, the only other recent brand extensions within  this category—Heinz’s organic ketchup and Hunt’s no­salt added—are focusing on  health benefits. Ketchup contains lycopene, a nutrient that has been linked to staving off some cancers and other diseases, and the recent brand extensions seem to be an attempt to appeal  to an increasingly health­conscious public. Sixty­six percent of consumers say that  they eat organic foods at least occasionally, according to the Organic Trade  Association (OTA). Smith isn't buying the organic angle, however. "It won't catch on,” he  asserts. “Heinz was worried with salsa, so they made a salsa ketchup  [in 1993 that was eventually discontinued].”   Expanding Markets Despite failed brand extensions and competition from more culturally  influenced condiments, Smith doesn’t see a decline in the ketchup  category coming anytime soon—and he looks to local food markets as    proof. “There are a huge number of designer ketchups,” he says. “If I go into a gourmet food  store here in New York, I’ll find ten or 15 different types of ketchup. It’s not just the  basic three. Restaurants are also serving fresh ketchup that they’re making themselves. I think that shows the vibrancy of the category—it’s an exciting field that hasn’t grown stagnant.”  Furthermore, there is an international market for the condiment. In other countries, as  Smith documents in his book, ketchup is used on anything from pasta (Holland and  Venezuela) to cabbage rolls (Japan) and meatballs and fishballs (Sweden). “The  formulas could also be different, depending on location,” he says. “They change based  on local needs." Kraft Foods, for example, produces curry­ and paprika­flavored  ketchups in Europe, says Smith. With that level of international appeal, ketchup is poised to become a respected  ingredient instead of a panacea for bland dishes. And, as with salt and mustard,  ketchup is gaining notoriety in the gourmet market, which may have Heinz seeing red.       [17­Nov­2008]
  9. 9.      Jennifer Gidman uses OJ as a breakfast supplement every morning and as an  indispensable ingredient in her mixology experiments every Friday night.     Other articles by this author          commenting closed   bookmark   print   suggest topic   recommend ( 43 )   email    The Squeeze on Ketchup      market leader(s), no matter how large and dominant they are, should they choose to  cut and slow innovation, that is when their foothold will start shaking. I got to say, life is tough, you need not only grow up but to keep on growing or the other  kids on the block will start bigger and bigger. innovation= business continuity.    Raziel, full time brand junkie/part time corporate sales ­ November 15, 2008     A few years ago I saw a TV documentary about the history of the Heinz company. After learning about their devotion to sanitation and their progressive policies for their workers,  I have been a loyal Heinz consumer.    Tom Brown, retired journalist ­ November 17, 2008     Raziel makes a good point regarding innovation = business continuity.  Let’s look at one startling point that was stated in the article: “people with household  incomes greater than US$ 100,000 are more likely to use Heinz, while Hunt's is the most  often­used ketchup brand in households with incomes less than US$ 20,000.” Can Heinz  take advantage of this data, and generate an offering that has some appeal to the under  $20k household (other than price point)? What is resonating with this group? Are there  emotional considerations when ketchup is purchased? By sitting back and not innovating,  Heinz may be missing an opportunity here to increase their stronghold on the category.    Dave, Marketing Communications, Michelin ­ November 17, 2008     I am a Heinz devotee but was sad to hear nothing about whether they are using  recycled materials for their bottles while Hunt's is doing so. Come on Heinz. Make me  proud.    ­ November 17, 2008     When you're this big you can leak from above and below. Above is the gourmet market.  People looking for the "fleur de sel" of red condiments are unlikely to go to any exotic new  product with the Heinz name on it ­ they'll want something from someone different. And  below: when I worked in restaurants I remember seeing staff refill Heinz bottles from  industrial cans of generic ketchup. This eventually cuts the 'sticky' product quality out  from under the name and the brand becomes more like a label. These, of course, are not  the worst kind of problems to have when you own the big 60 in the middle.    Paul Belserene, Senior Strategic Storyteller, Envisioning and Storytelling ­ November 17, 2008    view all comments     2009  | 2008  |  2007  |   2006  |   brandchannel home archive  2005  |   2004  |   2003  |   2002  |   2001    Dec 22, 2008  Brand Darwinism: When & Why Brands Falter & Die       Where brands go when they die.        Dec 15, 2008  M.H. Alshaya Co.: Paving the Way in Emerging Markets ­­  Mya Frazier       Alshaya offers brands direction in the Middle East.        Dec 8, 2008  Branding by the Nose in Brazil ­­  Ana Paula Palombo Terzi       Brazilian brands take a nose dive.        Dec 1, 2008  Wines: Is ''Made in France'' Enough? ­­  Joe Ray       French wine brands pour on uniqueness.        Nov 24, 2008  German Engineering Drives Global Brand Success ­­  Barry Silverstein       How German brands deliver discipline and quality.        Nov 10, 2008  Abu Dhabi: A City Rich in Branding ­­  Mya Frazier       The brand strategy behind the world's richest city. 
  10. 10.                    Barack Obama  clicks with voters?  by Jennifer Gidman   February 25, 2008  issue     And then there were three:  McCain, Hillary, and Barack. While  John McCain has safely locked up  the Republican Party's presidential candidate nomination, the  Democrats are still involved in a  battle between two tenacious  hopefuls who refuse to back  down: Hillary Clinton and Barack  Obama.    The brand that Obama’s camp is trying to sell isn’t difficult to nail down: He’s a  Washington interloper with fresh ideas (a trait that has become his liability as well as his    main selling point). He’s user­friendly and approachable—the type of guy you could  discuss critical issues with at a black­tie gala one evening, and mix a guacamole dip with  at a Super Bowl bash the next.  Obama also personifies the cutting­edge and tech­savvy candidate, with a deep  understanding of how to maximize today’s multimedia to communicate with his core  demographic. Here is where the Barack Obama website comes into play, extending his  brand to countless Internet political junkies who can surf to their hearts ’ content about  where he actually stands on the issues.  The site’s welcome mat features Barack, his wife, and two children, sitting arm­in­arm  under a slogan that reads "Change We Can Believe In." This page doesn’t come without  strings; before you’re taken to the home page, you’re faced down by the obligatory “fill­     in­your­email­and­zipcode­here­so­we­can­bombard­you­with­propaganda” signup  screen. (This, of course, is a common tactic employed by his competitors throughout the  quest for the Democratic, and Republican, nomination.)  The real branding and reaching out begins on the home page, which offers a countdown  to the campaign's goal of "One Million People Who Own This Campaign," a "State of the  Race" map, "Make a Difference" and "Next Up" sections, and six drop­down menus: Learn,  Issues, Media, Action, People, and States. There is even a BarackTV section that    features video clips from his speeches. Otherwise, the home page is dedicated to  breaking news, speaking engagements, and a detailed map of the US, broken down state­ by­state, encouraging visitors to click on "Where do you live" so they can become more  involved in local, grassroots politiking for Obama.  The Get Involved area highlights a place to donate, volunteer,  and register to vote. You can even sign up for "Camp Obama,"  a two­day training session that will indoctrinate you into the  Obama family and help you organize your own community to  support Barack. I even received my very own dinner invitation  from the unseen Obama Webmastercontingent, of course, on  my making a small donation and being one of the three average  citizens selected to attend. Devotees can also download icons  and logos to support the Obama mission (though organizers  probably could have come up with something a little more exciting than an “I’m Caucusing for Barack Obama” site widget).  Of course, Obama’s biggest challenge (besides his junior­politician status) has been trying to convince the American populace that he isn’t all sparkle and no substance. His site  would be prime real estate to really push his perspective on important issues, but while  the main nav bar links to an extensive section that contains detailed blueprints for  everything from improving our schools to protecting our borders, Obama’s team doesn’t    capitalize on this online opportunity to really put the issues front and center.  A political    website, like a political campaign, must be organized, informational, and motivational.  Barack's website offers all three of these components, but it remains to be seen if the  necessary balance is struck to most effectively promote the message, issues, and  constituents that comprise the Obama brand. 
  11. 11. To comparison shop, check out Hillary Clinton's website and John McCain's website as  well. Also, for a comprehensive look at the 2008 nominee hopefuls and their brands, visit  a study of the 2008 presidential candidates as consumer brands created by two South  Carolina firms, Chernoff Newman and Market Search. In this self­proclaimed intellectual  exercise, the firms ask such questions as: Are political candidates knowingly and  proactively setting forth to build their brand? And are the public’s perceptions of  candidates in sync with the attributes candidates are espousing in their advertising, press releases, and appearances?  And, of course, don't forget to vote.    Jennifer Gidman uses OJ as a breakfast supplement every morning and as an  indispensable ingredient in her mixology experiments every Friday night.  Other articles by this author  *Due to the constantly changing environment of websites, some reviews may no longer reflect the current  website for this brand.    commenting closed   bookmark   print   suggest topic   recommend ( 38 )   email    brandchannel webwatch    2009  | 2008  |  2007  |   2006  |   2005  |   2004  |   2003  |   2002  |   archive  2001      Dec 22, 2008  Nestlé’s Everyday Milk ­ dairy intimate ­­  Umair Naeem     Everyday milks tea time in Pakistan.          Dec 15, 2008  Brill ­ cutting it online? ­­  Abram Sauer     Brill is sharp online.          Dec 8, 2008  Femina ­ fashionable? ­­  Preeti Khicha     How Femina clicks with Indian women.          Dec 1, 2008  Cricinfo ­ fan friendly? ­­  Umair Naeem     Cricinfo swings at the future.          Nov 24, 2008  bumGenius.com ­ sensitive? ­­  Abram Sauer     Does this website dispose of diaper confusion?          Nov 17, 2008  SmartNow.com ­ resourceful? ­­  Abram Sauer     What is the future of SmartNow.com?          Nov 10, 2008  Campbell's Soup ­ un­canny ­­  Abram Sauer     Why Campbell's Soup is good for the online soul.          Nov 3, 2008  Arsenal ­ homepage advantage ­­  Preeti Khicha     This website needs a kick in the grass.          Oct 27, 2008  Cathay Pacific Airways ­ cabin fever ­­  Shashank Nigam     Cathay Pacific Airways takes flight online.          Oct 20, 2008  Flip Video ­ sleek ­­  Abram Sauer     Can Flip Video zoom in on online shoppers?          Oct 13, 2008  Asian Paints ­ a­peeling? ­­  Preeti Khicha     Can Asian Paints brush aside online competition?          Oct 6, 2008  Scholastic StudyJams ­ brain candy ­­  Alycia de Mesa     Why Scholastic StudyJams rocks online.          Sep 29, 2008  Incredible India ­ too spicy? ­­  Preeti Khicha     Indian culture spices up this dynamic website          Sep 22, 2008  Pottery Barn ­ home coming ­­  Vivian Manning­Schaffel     Does Pottery Barn's website sit well with the brand?          Sep 15, 2008  British Monarchy ­ rules ­­  Anthony Zumpano     Is the British Monarchy's website a royal pain?          Sep 8, 2008  Charmin ­ main squeeze ­­  Abram Sauer     Charmin's website offers a load of information.          Sep 1, 2008  Canadian Museum for Human Rights ­ ground breaking? ­­  Renée Alexander     CMHR goes online to give tragic history a new life.       

×