COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION READING LIST:
                                 CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORY


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Criminological Theory         Comprehensive Examination Reading List                                   Page 2


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Criminological Theory         Comprehensive Examination Reading List                                 Page 3


   C. STRAIN...
Criminological Theory          Comprehensive Examination Reading List                                  Page 4




C. SITUA...
Criminological Theory         Comprehensive Examination Reading List                                Page 5


E. CONFLICT, ...
Criminological Theory         Comprehensive Examination Reading List                               Page 6


   Cain, Maure...
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Comprehensive Exam Reading List

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Comprehensive Exam Reading List

  1. 1. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION READING LIST: CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORY I. CLASSICAL SCHOOL A. BECCARIA Beccaria, Cesare. On Crimes and Punishments. [1765] Translated by Richard Davies and Virginia Cox. In On Crimes and Punishments and Other Writings, edited by Richard Bellamy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Beirne, Piers. “Towards a Science of Homo Criminalis: Cesare Beccaria’s Dei Delitti e Delle Pene.” [1991] In Inventing Criminology: Essays on the Rise of ‘Homo Criminalis’. Albany: SUNY Press, 1993. II. POSITIVIST SCHOOL A. CRIME AND ABNORMALITY (CONSTITUTIONAL CRIMINOLOGY): Historical essays of mixed quality also can be found in: Pioneers of Criminology, edited by Hermann Mannheim. Montclair, New Jersey: Patterson Smith, [1972]. Beirne, Piers. Inventing Criminology: Essays on the Rise of ‘Homo Criminalis’. Albany: SUNY Press, 1993. Contains essays on Quetelet, Guerry, Tarde, Goring, and Lombroso, in addition to Beccaria. Ferri, Enrico. The Positive School of Criminology; Three Lectures by Enrico Ferri. [1901] Edited by S. E. Grupp. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1968. Gould, Stephen Jay. The Mismeasure of Man. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1981. Lombroso-Ferrero, Gina. Criminal Man, According to the Classification of Cesare Lombroso. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1911. Rafter, Nicole Hahn. Creating Born Criminals. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997. B. CRIME AND NORMALITY (RESPONSES TO CONSTITUTIONAL CRIMINOLOGY): Durkheim, Émile. Rules of Sociological Method. [1895] Eighth Edition. Translated by Sarah A. Solovay and John H. Mueller. Edited by George E. G. Catlin. New York: The Free Press, 1938. Mead, George Herbert. “The Psychology of Punitive Justice.” American Journal of Sociology 23 (1917- 18): 577-602.
  2. 2. Criminological Theory Comprehensive Examination Reading List Page 2 III. FORMATIVE SOCIOLOGY (1920–1950) A. THE CHICAGO SCHOOL Bulmer, Martin. The Chicago School of Sociology: Institutionalization, Diversity, and the Rise of Sociological Research. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984. Park, Robert E., Ernest W. Burgess, and R. D. McKenzie. The City: Suggestions for Investigation of Human Behavior in the Urban Environment. [1925]. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1967. Shaw, Clifford R. The Jack-Roller: A Delinquent Boy’s Own Story. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1930. Shaw, Clifford R., and Henry D. McKay. Juvenile Delinquency in Urban Areas. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1942. Thrasher, Frederic M. “Editor’s Preface;” “Introduction;” “Gangland;” and “Ganging,” In The Gang: A Study of 1,313 Gangs in Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1927. B. DIFFERENTIAL ASSOCIATION THEORY Akers, Ronald. Social Learning and Social Structure: A General Theory of Crime and Deviance. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1998. Costello, Barbara. “On the Logical Adequacy of Cultural Deviance Theories.” Theoretical Criminology 1, no. 4 (1997): 403-28. ——————. “The Remarkable Persistence of a Flawed Theory: A Rejoinder to Matsueda.” Theoretical Criminology 2, no. 1 (1998): 85-92. Kornhauser, Ruth R. Social Sources of Delinquency: An Appraisal of Analytic Models. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978. Laub, John H., and Robert J. Sampson. “The Sutherland-Glueck Debate: On the Sociology of Criminological Knowledge.” American Journal of Sociology 96, no. 6 (1991): 1402-40. Matsueda, Ross L. “‘Cultural Deviance Theory’: The Remarkable Persistence of a Flawed Term.” Theoretical Criminology 1, no. 4 (1997): 429-52. Response to Costello, above. Sutherland, Edwin H. The Professional Thief: By a Professional Thief. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1937. Sutherland, Edwin H., and Donald R. Cressey. Criminology. Ninth Edition. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1924. Sykes, Gresham M. and David Matza. “Techniques of Neutralization: A Theory of Delinquency.” American Sociological Review 22: 664-70.
  3. 3. Criminological Theory Comprehensive Examination Reading List Page 3 C. STRAIN THEORIES Agnew, Robert. “Foundation for a General Strain Theory of Crime and Delinquency.” Criminology 30 (1992): 47-66. Cloward, Richard A. and Lloyd E. Ohlin. Delinquency and Opportunity: A Theory of Delinquent Gangs. New York: Free Press, 1960. Cohen, Albert K. Delinquent Boys: The Culture of the Gang. New York: Free Press, 1955. Messner, Steven F. and Richard Rosenberg. Crime and the American Dream. Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1994. Merton, Robert K. “Opportunity Structure.” In The Legacy of Anomie Theory, edited by Freda Adler and William Laufer. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers, 1995. Provides an account of the origins of strain theory and its development into subcultural theory. ——————. “Social Structure and Anomie.” American Sociological Review 3 (Oct. 1938): 672-82. Reprinted in On Social Structure and Science, essays by Robert K. Merton, edited by Piotr Sztompka. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. D. CULTURAL CONFLICT THEORIES Erlanger, Howard. “Is There a Subculture of Violence in the South?” Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 66 (1976): 483-490. Sellin, Thorsten. Culture Conflict and Crime. New York: Social Science Research Council, 1938. Wolfgang, Marvin E., and Franco Ferracuti. The Subculture of Violence. London: Social Science Paperbacks: 1967. IV. SOCIOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS (1950–??) A. CONTROL THEORIES Gottfredson, Michael R., and Travis Hirschi. A General Theory of Crime. Berkeley, California: Stanford University Press, 1990. Hirschi, Travis. Causes of Delinquency. Berkeley, California: University of California Press, 1969. Matza, David. Delinquency and Drift. New York: John Wiley, 1964. Tittle, Charles. Control Balance: Toward a General Theory of Deviance. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1995. B. LIFE-COURSE THEORIES Sampson, Robert, and John Laub. Crime in the Making: Pathways and Turning Points Through Life. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1993.
  4. 4. Criminological Theory Comprehensive Examination Reading List Page 4 C. SITUATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND VICTIMOLOGY Bottoms, Anthony E. “Environmental Criminology.” In The Oxford Handbook of Criminology, edited by Mike Maguire, Rod Morgan, and Robert Reiner. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1994. Cohen, Lawrence E., and Marcus Felson. “Social Change and Crime Rate Trends: A Routine Activity Approach.” American Sociological Review 44 (August 1979): 588-608. Felson, Marcus. Crime and Everyday Life: Insights and Implications for Society. Thousand Oaks, California: Pine Forge Press, 1994. Garland, David. “The Limits of the Sovereign State: Strategies of Crime Control in Contemporary Society.” The British Journal of Criminology 36, no. 4 (Autumn 1996): 445-71. Hindelang, Michael J., Michael R. Gottfredson, and James Garofalo. Victims of Personal Crime: An Empirical Foundation For a Theory of Personal Victimization. Cambridge, Mass: Ballinger Publishing Company, 1978. Wilson, James Q. “Broken Windows: The Police and Neighborhood Safety.” [1982]. In Thinking about Crime. Revised edition. New York: Vintage Books, 1983. ——————. “Thinking About Crime.” [1975]. In Thinking about Crime. Revised edition. New York: Vintage Books, 1983. Wright, Richard T. & Decker, Scott H. Armed Robbers in Action: Stickups and Street Culture. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1997. D. LABELING AND SHAMING THEORIES; ETHNOMETHODOLOGY Becker, Howard S. Outsiders: Studies in the Sociology of Deviance. New York: Free Press, 1963. Braithwaite, John. Crime, Shame, and Reintegration. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Ferrell, Jeff. Crimes of Style: Urban Graffiti and the Politics of Criminality. Boston, Massachusetts: Northeastern University Press, 1996. Garfinkel, Harold. “Conditions of Successful Degradation Ceremonies.” American Journal of Sociology 61, February (1956): 420-24. Goffman, Erving. Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1963. Lemert, Edwin M. “Beyond Mead: The Societal Reaction to Deviance.” Social Problems 21 (April 1974): 457-68. Liazos, Alexander. “The Poverty of the Sociology of Deviance: Nuts, Sluts, and Perverts.” Social Problems 20, Summer (1972): 103-20.
  5. 5. Criminological Theory Comprehensive Examination Reading List Page 5 E. CONFLICT, RADICAL, AND CRITICAL THEORIES Beckett, Katherine. Making Crime Pay: Law and Order in Contemporary American Politics. London: Oxford University Press, 1997. Chambliss, William. “A Sociological Analysis of the Law of Vagrancy.” Social Problems 12, Summer (1964): 150-70. Colvin, Mark, & Pauly, John. “A Critique of Criminology: Toward an Integrated Structural Marxist Theory of Delinquency Production.” American Journal of Sociology 89 (1983): 513-51. Greenberg, David. Crime and Capitalism: Readings in Marxist Criminology. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1993. Hulsman, Louk H. C. “Critical Criminology and the Concept of Crime.” Contemporary Crises 10 no. 1 (1986): 63-80. Quinney, Richard. The Social Reality of Crime. Boston: Little, Brown, 1970. Simpson, Sally S., & Elis, Lori. “Is Gender Subordinate to Class? An Empirical Assessment of Colvin and Pauly’s Structural Marxist Theory of Delinquency.” The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 85 (1994): 453-70. Taylor, Ian, Paul Walton, and Jock Young. The New Criminology: For a Social Theory of Deviance. New York: Harper and Row, 1973. Turk, Austin. “Conflict and Criminality.” American Sociological Review 31 (June 1966): 338-52. Walton, Paul, and Jock Young, ed. The New Criminology Revisited. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998. Young, Jock, and R. Matthews. Rethinking Criminology: The Realist Debate. Beverly Hills, California: Sage Publications, 1992. F. RACE, WORK, AND THE CHANGING CITY Anderson, Elijah. The Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1999. Pattillo-McCoy, Mary Black Picket Fences: Privilege and Peril among the Black Middle Class. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999. (Chapters 3-6) Sampson, Robert, and William Julius Wilson. “Toward a Theory of Race, Crime and Urban Inequality.” In Crime and Inequality, edited by John Hagan and Ruth D. Peterson. Berkeley, California: Stanford University Press, 1995. G. FEMININITIES, MASCULINITIES, VIOLENCE, FEMINIST CRITIQUES OF CRIMINOLOGY Belknap, J. The Invisible Woman: Gender, Crime, and Justice.. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing, 1996.
  6. 6. Criminological Theory Comprehensive Examination Reading List Page 6 Cain, Maureen. “Towards Transgression: New Directions in Feminist Criminology.” International Journal of the Sociology of Law, 18 no. 1 (1990): 1-18. Chesney-Lind, Meda. “Girls, Crime, and Women’s Place: Towards a Feminist Model of Female Delinquency.” Crime and Delinquency 35 (1981): 5-29. Daly, Kathleen. “Different Ways of Conceptualizing Sex/Gender in Feminist Theory and the Implications for Criminology.” Theoretical Criminology 1, no. 1 (1997): 25-51. Messerschmidt, James. Masculinites and Crime: Critique and Reconceptualization of Theory. Rowman and Littlefield, 1993. Newburn, Tim, and Elizabeth A. Stanko. Just Boys Doing Business? Men, Masculinities and Crime. London: Routledge, 1994. Polk, Kenneth. When Men Kill: Scenarios of Masculine Violence. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Rafter, Nicole Hahn, and Frances Heidensohn, ed. International Feminist Perspectives in Criminology: Engendering a Discipline. Buckingham: Open University Press, 1995. Smart, Carol. “Feminist Approaches to Criminology: Postmodern Woman meets Atavistic Man.” In Feminist Perspectives in Criminology, edited by A. Morris and L. Gelsthorpe, 71-84. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1990. Young, Alison. “Criminology and the Question of Feminism.” In Imagining Crime: Textual Outlaws and Criminal Conversations. London: SAGE Publications, 1996. H. FUTURES AND CRITIQUES OF CRIMINOLOGY Bennett, James. Oral History and Delinquency: The Rhetoric of Criminology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981. Cohen, Stanley. Against Criminology. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers, 1992. Currie, E. Confronting Crime: An American Challenge. New York: Pantheon, 1985. Laub, John H. Criminology in the Making: An Oral History. Boston, Mass: Northeastern University Press, 1983. Nelken, D., editor. The Futures of Criminology. London: Sage, 1994. Williams, Frank P. III. “The Sociology of Criminological Theory: Paradigm or Fad.” In the Sociology of Delinquency: Current Issues, edited by Gary F. Jensen. Beverly Hills, California: Sage, 1981.

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