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Tim slides

  1. 1. A
Walk
on
Brandon
Hill
 Humanity
and
Nature
in
the
City
of
Slavery

  2. 2. Choosing
 A
decaying
piece
of
wood
under
a
plane
tree
 caught
my
eye.

  3. 3. I
thought
of
decay
and
ageing
and
looked
more
 closely.


 It
was
reddish
and
full
of
holes.

It
lay
like
a
 carcass
amongst
fallen
leaves.

  4. 4. It
was
a
habitat.


 I
wondered
who
inhabited
it
and
when
and
how
 they
came
to
live
in
it.


 RoBng
and
decay
was
the
pre‐condiDon
of
its
 homeliness

  5. 5. Observing
and
describing
 This
is
quite
small,
about
four
inches
long
and
 reddish
in
colour.

There
are
white,
powdery
 deposits
which
could
be
fungal
growth.

It
is
 wider
at
one
end
and
tapers
to
a
point.



  6. 6. If
it
were
possible
to
stand
it
poinDng
upwards,
it
 would
look
like
nothing
more
exactly
than
a
 termites’
mound.
 How
interesDng,
that
a
process
of
decay
and
the
 industrious
construcDon
of
several
thousand
 insects
can
produce
habitats
so
similar
in
form!

  7. 7. Ques3oning
 •  Which
kind
of
tree
was
it
once
a
part
of?

Was
 it
a
plane
tree?
 •  What
is
the
significance
of
plane
trees?
 •  What
gave
it
its
red
colour?
 •  How
long
did
it
take,
from
falling
to
the
 ground,
for
the
wood
to
become
like
this?
 •  How
long
does
it
take
for
a
piece
of
wood
to
 rot
down
completely?
 •  Who
lives
in
it
and
when
did
they
arrive?

  8. 8. Metaphysical
ques3ons
 •  How
do
people
intervene
in
nature’s
progress
 from
new
growth
to
dying
and
decay?
 •  Why
do
we
find
meaning
in
shapes
even
 though
they
may
be
random?
 •  Does
anyone
else
find
beauty
in
roNenness
 and
decay?
 •  What
can
I
learn
from
this
about
living
life
 more
richly
Dll
the
day
I
die?

  9. 9. Stories:
 My
exisDng
knowledge
 I
already
know
and
love
John
Keats’
fascinaDon
 with
the
beauty
and
transience
of
nature

  10. 10. Melancholy
 She
dwells
with
Beauty—Beauty
that
must
die;
 And
Joy,
whose
hand
is
ever
at
his
lips
 Bidding
adieu...

  11. 11. Welcome
Joy
and
Welcome
Sorrow
 WELCOME
joy,
and
welcome
sorrow...
 Come
to‐day,
and
come
to‐morrow,

 I
do
love
you
both
together!

 I
love
to
mark
sad
faces
in
fair
weather;

 And
hear
a
merry
laugh
amid
the
thunder;

 Fair
and
foul
I
love
together...
 Infant
playing
with
a
skull;

 Morning
fair,
and
shipwreck'd


















 hull...

  12. 12. Keats
was
profoundly
influenced
by
Shakespeare,
 who
wove
the
theme
of
decay
richly
into
the
 imagery
of
Hamlet
 ‘there’s something ro1en in the state of Denmark!’

  13. 13. ...and
touched
on
it
in
other,
late
plays...
 Now bless thyself: thou me1est with things dying, I  with things newborn

  14. 14. New
Learning
 If
you
Google
‘roNenness’,
a
Punk
website
is
the
 first
hit.

Did
the
Punk
movement
draw
on
 some
deep
insDnct
in
people
for
reconciling
 ourselves
to
death
and
decay,
or
was
it
just
a
 reacDon
to
a
complacent
20th
Century
culture
 of
order
and
control?


 Or
both?

  15. 15. If
you
Google
‘decay’,
you
find
a
New
York
Boy
 Band
has
called
itself
‘Decaydance’!
Here
is
 one
of
their
t‐shirts.

  16. 16. Encountering
funds
of
knowledge
 It
could
be
more
interesDng
for
this
enquiry
to
 look
into
‘roNen
wood’.
Google
gives
nine
 opDons,
mostly
on
wood
treatment
and
 restoraDon,
but
also
one
on
‘roNen
wood
 insects’.

 Clearly
there
are
enthusiasts
out
there...

  17. 17. ...
including
the
writers
of
this
‘Elytra
and
 Antenna’
website:
 “These
pages
are
dedicated
to
those
enthusiasts
whose
 love
for
beetles,
walkingsDcks,
grasshoppers,
 manDds,
and
other
invertebrates
has
brought
them
 to
rearing
of
these
alien
creatures
so
that
they
can
 enjoy
their
anDcs
and
beauty
year
round.”
 Females
lay
eggs
in
holes
that
they
 excavate
in
old
roNen
wood.
Larvae
feed
 on
the
fungi
and
take
about
nine
months
 to
reach
maturity
when
fed
roNen
oak,
 beech
and
some
other
hardwoods.
 medium
stag
beetle

  18. 18. The
big
‘world‐view’
quesDon
 Who
finds
beauty
in
 death?
 Learning
RelaDonships!
 Someone
tells
me
about...

  19. 19. The
Exquisite
Corpse
 Wikipedia:
 Exquisite
corpse
(also
known
as
exquisite
cadaver
 or
rota3ng
corpse)
is
a
method
by
which
a
 collecDon
of
words
or
images
is
collecDvely
 assembled.
Each
collaborator
adds
to
a
 composiDon
in
sequence,
either
by
following
a
 rule
(e.g.
"The
adjec@ve
noun
adverb
verb
the
 adjec@ve
noun")
or
by
being
allowed
to
see
the
 end
of
what
the
previous
person
contributed.

  20. 20. Google:
‘beauty
of
death’

  21. 21. Gregor
Schneider
 “There
is
nothing
perverse
about
a
dying
person
in
an
 art
gallery...”
(April
2008)
 For
years,
I
have
a
dreamed
of
a
room
in
which
people
 can
die
in
peace.
It's
a
simple
room:
flooded
with
light,
 with
a
wooden
floor
 I
have
recreated
this
room
‐
as
an
arDst,
that
is
what
I
do
‐
 and
at
the
moment,
it
is
standing
right
here
in
my
 studio.
Any
minute
it
could
be
dismantled,
put
on
a
 plane
and
reinstalled
anywhere
in
the
world,
for
 someone
nearing
the
end
of
their
days
and
who
wants
 to
die
in
a
humane
and
harmonious
environment.

  22. 22. "I
want
to
display
a
person
dying
 naturally
...
or
somebody
who
 has
just
died.
My
aim
is
to
show
 the
beauty
of
death."

  23. 23. ReacDon!
 I'm
not
a
naive
person,
but
I
don't
think
there
is
 anything
wrong
or
perverse
about
this
dream.
 I
think
it's
quite
innocent.
So
it
has
been
rather
 a
shock
to
me
that
for
the
last
week
I
have
 been
receiving
death
threats
by
phone
and
 email.

  24. 24. Who
and
what
is
decaying
here?
 •  Within
a
few
days,
thousands
of
arDcles
appeared
 across
the
world...
In
a
way,
I
am
not
surprised
that
 they
have
triggered
some
absolutely
horrific
images
in
 the
heads
of
journalists
and
readers.
And
yet
I
am
sDll
 astonished
by
the
nature
of
the
comments
I
received,
 and
disturbed
by
their
vulgarity
and
violence.
I
 received
threats
in
mulDple
languages,
some
of
them
 absurd,
some
of
them
seriously
threatening.
 •  Someone
emailed
to
suggest
I
should
be
"slaughtered"
 and
given
"the
Jesus
treatment".
Someone
else
 emailed:
"Why
don't
you
kill
your
mother
and
show
 her
to
us
while
he's
[sic]
dying?"
Another
told
me
my
 artworks
were
"degenerate".


  25. 25. The
Beauty
of
Death
 by
Kahlil
Gibran

 
Sing
of
the
past
as
you
behold
the
dawn
of
 hope
in
my
eyes,
for



 
Its
magic
meaning
is
a
soi
bed
upon
which
my
 heart
rests.




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