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Open access and open data: international trends and strategic context

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Governments around the world fund billions of dollars in research every year. Ensuring that the results of research are available to the public, other researchers and industry has become an important underlying value in order to maximize the impact of our publicly funded research. This session will discuss what’s driving the trend towards greater openness and provide an overview of international developments that will help put Canada’s activities into context.

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Open access and open data: international trends and strategic context

  1. 1. 1 Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  2. 2. You need “data” for data science (Kayur Patel, this morning) 2
  3. 3. Open Science Outline of Presentation • What is open science? • What’s driving this trend? • The policy environment • Research data • Conclusions Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015 3
  4. 4. What is open science?  Began with open access to publications, but moving to research data and other outputs  Parallel to Open Government/Open Data movement Openness means: • Sharing and access to all types of research outputs • Transparency of research findings • Open peer review & open citations • Equitable flow of knowledge 4Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  5. 5. 5 This is big data…
  6. 6. Research data is a subset of “big data” Research data are the “data, records, files or other evidence, irrespective of their content or form (e.g. in print, digital, physical or other forms), that comprise research observations, findings or outcomes, including primary materials and analysed data.”(Monash University Research Data Policy) 6 Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  7. 7. What is driving this trend? “Public access is intended to accelerate the dissemination of fundamental research results that will advance the frontiers of knowledge and help ensure the nation’s future prosperity” (National Science Foundation, March 18, 2015) Benefits of Research Data Management 1. Verification, reproducibility and transparency of scientific results 2. New scientific discoveries through collaboration and integration of datasets 3. Greater social and economic impact through application of research outputs 7 Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  8. 8. What is driving this trend? And, because we can! 8 Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  9. 9. Move towards openness Slide from Giulia Ajmone Marsan, Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation, OECD Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015 9
  10. 10. Open Scientific Research Data We are committed to openness in scientific research data to speed up the progress of scientific discovery, create innovation, ensure that the results of scientific research are as widely available as practical, enable transparency in science and engage the public in the scientific process. Expanding Access to Scientific Research Results We endorse the principle that increasing access to the peer- reviewed, published results of publicly funded published research will accelerate research, drive innovation, and benefit the economy. 10Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015 G8 Science Ministers, June 2013
  11. 11. Global Research Council- May 2013 Action Plan towards Open Access to Publications “In order to increase their return on investments, research councils encourage open access to all results from publicly funded research which originated from their funding. This relates specifically to journal articles.” 11 Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  12. 12. Kathleen Shearer - Cybera September 2015 12 Research funders’ Open Access policies Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015 1212
  13. 13. Current policy context in Canada Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2014-2016 Tri-Agencies (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC) • Consultation in 2013 (Report: Capitalizing on Big Data: Toward a Policy Framework for Advancing Digital Scholarship in Canada) • Comprehensive Brief on Data Management Policies, April 2015 • Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications • Draft Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management “…the Government of Canada will establish a government- wide approach to Open Science to increase access to federally- funded scientific publications and data.” Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015 13
  14. 14. Draft Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015 • Data Management Planning • Constraints and obligations “Research data must be managed in conformity with all commercial, legal and ethical obligations” (including privacy and confidentiality)” • Adherence to Standards • Collection and Storage • Metadata • Preservation, Retention and Sharing • Timeliness • Acknowledgement and Citation • Efficient and Cost Effective NINE PRINCIPLES
  15. 15. 15 Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015 Policies are an important lever to move this trend forward
  16. 16. But we need more than just principles and policies These services support only a small portion of research data produced in Canada! 16 Domain data services Institutional data services International all- purpose Infrastructure and Services Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  17. 17. 17 The data landscape The 2011 survey by Science, found that over half of those polled store their data only in their laboratories and 48.3% of respondents were working with datasets that were less than 1GB in size. Science 11 February 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6018 pp. 692- 693 DOI: 10.1126/science.331.6018.692 Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  18. 18. Trend towards distributed, global networked infrastructure for research data 18Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015 • New infrastructure models for research data are distributed systems that bridge central domain approaches with institutional services and repositories • Distributed models are more sustainable (because they are built on many nodes) • The Internet is an example of a highly successful distributed system!
  19. 19. A lot of this is about cultural change 19Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  20. 20. Many researchers would rather share their toothbrush than their data! 20Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  21. 21. From Wiley’s Research Data Insights Survey, 2014 2,250 responses from around the world http://exchanges.wiley.com/blog/2014/11/03/how-and-why-researchers-share-data-and-why-they- don’t/ 21 Researchers attitudes about data sharing Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  22. 22. 22 From the cover of “Cultural Change Through Measurable Management” by Robin Byrne Both policy requirements and incentives are critical for cultural change
  23. 23. Some concluding thoughts • We don’t yet know the full benefits of making research outputs available • The trend towards open science is global and gaining in momentum • To remain in step with our international peers, Canada must continue to invest in research data management 23Kathleen Shearer – Cyber Summit, Banff AB - September 29, 2015
  24. 24. Thank you Kathleen Shearer Executive Director, Confederation of Open Access Repositories Consultant, Canadian Association of Research Libraries Research Data Canada Association of Research Libraries (US) email: m.kathleen.shearer@gmail.com 24

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