A Decade of SharePoint Adoption Strategies

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In ten years, we’ve seen a wide range of SharePoint usage and success. Based on ten years’ experience as a SharePoint architect, author and consultant for users in multinational Fortune 500 enterprises as well as five person small businesses, we'll share the best (and a little of the worst!) in proven user adoption strategies. We’ll cover training, project design, “killer apps”, expectation management, user support and SLAs, generational and international audiences, “marketing for IT”, and the three things to NEVER allow in any SharePoint rollout.Presented 15 Dec 2011 at the Puget Sound SharePoint User Group

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  • SharePoint 2010 can be compared to a functional “firehose”, having grown from a simple tool for team documents and dashboards in 2001, to the rich multifunctional environment of SharePoint 2010. (BI! Workflow! Social computing! Data integration! Etc.) And if you can’t push on a rope, as they say, you really can’t push a firehose – users need to pull it in. Attendees passionately shared their stories about the major intrinsic enablers and roadblocks to SharePoint adoption.
  • CFM ROI: e.g. online collaboration reduces travel costsimportance of responsive, qualitative system performance for users to sustain enthusiasm.Rapid development and deployment of user-oriented solutions
  • CFMSpeed to market -- boil the ocean approach to solving too many problemsOver-governance: (e.g. too hard to get sites)Maintenance: Redundancy of content -- Documents duplicated in file systems and multiple sites – lack of operational governance and user guidanceField of Dreams– if you build it they will come.
  • [MG]Lunch Application –KMA clients use lunch or catering order application on SharePoint. Users seem to really emotionally bond to these solutions – it’s fun & essential and replaces slower, manual processes.Dynamic Content on Home Page – Offering a fresh cycle of new information on the home page is thought to be equally or more important to clean attractive design.Birthday List – another example of fun, unique and essential information that bonds users with the siteFind that first one! Think horizontal.
  • [mg] Branding/Naming – In particular when companies are launching or relaunching a SharePoint based project, it helps to brand the project with the name of the site (e.g. “I’m using MyCompany” instead of “I’m using “SharePoint”.Marketing & Segmentation – it’s important to understand that the adoption message needs to be distinguished not only for different groups of business users (power users/casual users) but also different IT constituents (developers/server teams/analysts & PMs)
  • [CFM] Survey – use SharePoint surveys to measure success and determine future directionsAdministrative Tools – measure what people are looking for
  • [mg] Departmental Approach – build success at a lower level first before tackling enterprise wide adoptionSteering Committee (Cross-Functional) – it helps when the project is accountable to a frequently meeting team of empowered business stakeholders drawn from multiple departments, not just IT and HR.Move Fast – quick early successes count more than long, late successes
  • [CFM] SharePoint -> SharePoint – use a SharePoint site itself to supply support to usersPrepare Support Teams – make sure Help Desks and customization teams are available and trained in advance to minimize the risk of failing to meet rising expectations.Self Service Support/Communities – some companies reports tremendous success using discussions, blogs, and wikis to help users help each otherTeam Leaders Support/Decentralized – Another approach is to decentralize support to power users or team captains in each logical group of usersTech Sheets – Quick one page tips or FAQs can be written and distributed to users and helps desk via email, web sites, print distribution or knowledge bases.
  • [cfm]Many users schedule a “big event” (usually a breakfast event in the morning, sometimes a lunch, rarely an evening happy hour) the day the site “launches”. In conjunction, these events often offer:TrainingContests and prizes, often with a scavenger huntPublic awardsGiveaways – branded coffee cups, mouse pads or wallet cards with tips and helpful informationResource: “Buzz kit” (2007) replaced by “I use SharePoint”Mother of Navy Seal Michael Murphy christening warship named for her son, posthumously awarded CMH for valor in Afghanistan, first to receive it since Vietnam War.
  • [mg] Douglas MacGregor @ MIT Sloan in 1960s developed thisSharePoint -> SharePoint – use a SharePoint site itself to supply support to usersPrepare Support Teams – make sure Help Desks and customization teams are available and trained in advance to minimize the risk of failing to meet rising expectations.Self Service Support/Communities – some companies reports tremendous success using discussions, blogs, and wikis to help users help each otherTeam Leaders Support/Decentralized – Another approach is to decentralize support to power users or team captains in each logical group of usersTech Sheets – Quick one page tips or FAQs can be written and distributed to users and helps desk via email, web sites, print distribution or knowledge bases.
  • Bonus: SharePoint Maturity Model. If you currently use SharePoint, use this model to baseline your maturity and adoption levels, benchmark them against similar companies, and track your progress over time.
  • [mg] This is one of my favorites. Usually, some senior person complains they can never find anything on the "H drive". Since SharePoint offers a searchable web interface, it has to be better, right? Sure - except if you just dump all that content in without thinking, all you get is a SharePoint site with top level folders called "bobtest". "newtest", "newtest 2", and “sales1997”. Same problem, in a new shiny package. Likelihood of project death – 50%.
  • [cfm] Just because you can doesn’t mean you should, and without proper training, you will only confuse people, at least, until someone goes in and simplifies it. SharePoint is powerful, often complex. Entering at the pinnacle of complexity management is a surefire way to alienate early adopters. We’ve seen this multiple times, and the result is almost always the same. Likelihood of project death – 75%, (until someone new comes in to clean up the complexity.)
  • [mg] This one is pretty simple – how do you define success? If success equals a well-used site, then this virtually guarantees failure. Simply sending around an email announcing your new site doesn’t cut it. People learn differently, and many folks need multiple “touches” before they feel comfortable. Death rate – 75%
  • CFMMulti-generational: Different generations adopt technology differently. Different ages have different comfort levels with web technology (corporate sites vs. social networking) and platforms (PC or laptop or smartphone)Multi-national: global audiences have different preferences for platforms, tools, bandwidth and site performance expectationsMulti-platform: mobile enablement
  • A Decade of SharePoint Adoption Strategies

    1. 1. A Decade of SharePoint 2010Adoption StrategiesPuget Sound SharePoint User GroupChris McNultySharePoint Strategic Product ManagerDecember 2011 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    2. 2. Chris McNulty• SharePoint Strategic Product Manager at Quest Software• 10+ years with SharePoint• 20 years consulting (led KMA SharePoint practice) and financial services technology (Santander, John Hancock/Manulife, GMO, State Street)• MBA in Investment Management from Boston College• Write and speak often on Microsoft IW technologies (blogs & books)• MCSE MCTS MSA MVTSP MCC• Hiking, cooking, playing guitar, colonial history, photography• My family: Hayley, three kids (17, 7, 5) and my dog Stan 2 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    3. 3. Two RolesTechnical Stakeholder Business Stakeholder“Push” with some “pull” “Pull” with some “push”Wants and Needs: Wants and Needs: Performance Economic Justification Security Network Effect Compliance “My solution” becomes “Our solution”Adoption = Someone else’s problem Adoption = If no one else is doing it, why should I? 4 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    4. 4. Today’s Session, in detail• Hallmarks of good adoption• Roadblocks or symptoms of bad adoption• Tools and techniques that our clients have used to drive adoption• Worst practices• Q&A, Resources, Closing 5 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    5. 5. The SharePoint Firehose
    6. 6. What is adoption?• Defined: To choose as standard or required (www.thefreedictionary.com)• User Satisfaction 7 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    7. 7. Enablers/Indicators Long uptimes Business users perceive value No complaints, no help desk tickets, happy users Measurable ROI Speed to Market 8 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    8. 8. Roadblocks to Adoption• Speed to market• Over-governance• Maintenance• No/bad sponsorship• Redundancy of content• Too many documents• "Field of dreams" mentality 9 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    9. 9. Adoption tools and techniques ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    10. 10. Unique applications and solutions• Lunch/Catering Application• Dynamic, Targeted Content on Home Page• Birthday List• Today @ACME / Meeting Room Central 11 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    11. 11. Training • Lunch and Learn • Formal Training – Internal – External site • Product vs Solution
    12. 12. Marketing• Branding/Naming • First rule of SharePoint – don’t call it SharePoint! • E.g., Nebula • Cramerville • Shmoogle • BaseCamp• Segmentation 13 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    13. 13. Assessment• Survey• Administrative Tools• Feedback mechanism prominent on the front page• Visible and available super-users or support staff• Maturity models (www.spmaturity.com) 14 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    14. 14. Project Design• Departmental Approach• Steering Committee (Cross- Functional)• Move Fast • Quick early successes count more • Drive fast, take chances! 15 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    15. 15. Support• SharePoint for SharePoint• Prepare Support Teams• Self Service Support/Communities• Team Leaders Support/Decentralized• Tech Sheets – Quick one page tips or FAQs
    16. 16. Launch Events• “Big event” • Usually a breakfast • Sometimes a lunch • Rarely an evening happy hour• Gift bags/materials • Training • Contests and prizes, often with a scavenger hunt • Public awards • Giveaways – branded items with tips and helpful information• Resources: “I Use SharePoint” 17 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    17. 17. Miscellaneous MotivationsTheory Y Theory X• SLAs • Home Page Lockin• Chargeback incentives • Mandates• Viral Communications • “Burn the Boats”• Social Communities• Badges 18 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    18. 18. “Accessory After the Fact”• 5 things to do after 3 months in production • Usage/Search logs • MySite self-population • Content growth trends • Repeat rollout training • Re-evaluate roadmap 19 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    19. 19. Worst Practices!Three things to never allow inyour SharePoint deploymentaka“How to squash adoption inthree easy steps” 20 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    20. 20. No. No, no, no.
    21. 21. Import file shares as-is
    22. 22. Introduce 100s of content types…
    23. 23. Deployment plan?Outlook…
    24. 24. Closing thoughts – Know Your Audience• Multigenerational• Multinational• Multi-platform 25 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    25. 25. Resources - General• From Microsoft: • SharePoint Adoption tools: http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/iusesharepoint/landing.aspx• From Others • SharePoint Maturity Model (SPMaturity.com) • Susan Hanley (susanhanley.com)• From Quest (www.sharepointforall.com) 26 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    26. 26. Photo Credits• “Two faces” flickr photo from heyjoewhereyougoinwiththatguninyourhand used via Creative Commons license: http://www.flickr.com/photos/heyjoewhereyougoingwiththatguninyourhand/1 29124058/sizes/l/in/photostream/• “Hose contest splashes” flickr photo from DrewbieDoo used via Creative Commons license: http://www.flickr.com/photos/drewbiedoo/538051654/sizes/l/in/photostream/• “x y” flickr photo from Jean Hambourg used via Creative Commons license: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jihef/10453062/sizes/z/in/photostream/• Fight Club poster ©EnderTheThird at DeviantArt• Mother of Navy Seal Michael Murphy (christening ship) flickr photo from US Navy Images via Creative Commons license: http://www.flickr.com/photos/usnavy/5710217589/sizes/o/in/photostream/ 27 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    27. 27. •Questions•Contact Me•SharePint 28 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    28. 28. Thank you…• Contact • Email chris.mcnulty@quest.com • Blog http://www.chrismcnulty.net/blog • Also http://www.sharepointforall.com • Twitter: @cmcnulty2000 • LinkedIn:http://www.linkedin.com/in/cmcnulty• Upcoming: • Jan. 2011 – SPS Austin TX (Business Intelligence) • Feb 2011 – SPTechCon SanFrancisco, SPSaturday Philly • Mar 2011 – SharePoint Connections Las Vegas, SharePoint Conference Australia 29 ©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..
    29. 29. 30©2011 Quest Software, Inc. All rights reserved..

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