Unf Research Presentation

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Dr. Chris Brown, Research Interests at University of N. Florida

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  • 4 4 About 60% of the ASR sites store surface water following treatment, and the remainder store groundwater from other aquifers, or the same aquifer at a different location. Storage zones are usually confined aquifers, but a few are unconfined shallow aquifers. Storage zone depths range from 200 ft to 2600 ft. Storage zone lithologies include sand, sandstone, clayey sand, limestone, dolomite, glacial drift, alluvial, basalt, … Bubbles of stored water usually don’t extend more than a few hundred feet around each ASR well, and they tend to stay close to the well during storage and recovery. Natural groundwater movement is usually just a few feet per year.
  • Possible reactions that may occur near and away from the borehole
  • ASR is by no means a trivial component of the Restudy The Restudy team correctly made some conservative assumptions regarding the level of pretreatment prior to ASR storage. Lessons learned from operational testing of the pilot ASR systems will allow refinement of these treatment assumptions. Aeration will increase dissolved oxygen
  • ASR is by no means a trivial component of the Restudy The Restudy team correctly made some conservative assumptions regarding the level of pretreatment prior to ASR storage. Lessons learned from operational testing of the pilot ASR systems will allow refinement of these treatment assumptions. Aeration will increase dissolved oxygen
  • ASR is by no means a trivial component of the Restudy The Restudy team correctly made some conservative assumptions regarding the level of pretreatment prior to ASR storage. Lessons learned from operational testing of the pilot ASR systems will allow refinement of these treatment assumptions. Aeration will increase dissolved oxygen
  • Sources & Notes: All data is for 2000. All calculations are based on CO2 equivalents, using 100-year global warming potentials from the IPCC (1996), based on a total global estimate of 41,755 MtCO2 equivalent. Land use change includes both emissions and absorptions; see Chapter 16. See Appendix 2 for detailed description of sector and end use/activity definitions, as well as data sources. Dotted lines represent flows of less than 0.1% percent of total GHG emissions.
  • Sources & Notes: WRI based on IEA, 2004b. Shares are based on gigawatt hours of generation.
  • Carbon capture and storage is the process of collecting CO2 and potentially other greenhouse gases at source, transporting it via a variety of modes, but primarily by pipeline, and injecting the CO2 into geologic strata or deep saline aquifers.
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