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iii
Autumn 2021
The Anchor
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Inside This Issue
PG. 2 Church Calendar – Events in October and November
PG. 3 Rev’s Writings – Welcoming people into God’s family
PG. 4 In Focus – Our shared history. Stories of our merged
parishes
PG.17 What’s Happening in YOUR Parish
PG 24 Photo Gallery
PG 28 The Last Word
865 Lakeshore Drive Dorval, QC H9S 2C7
T: 514-631-3601
E: allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com
www.pramchurch.org
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Church Calendar
Sunday services at 10am in-
church and online
Corporation meetings:
Wednesdays at noon
Evening Prayer: Monday –
Saturday
Meditatio: Mondays at 2pm
in the chapel
Messy Church: Fridays at
5:30pm
Links to register for services may be found in your
weekly email and on the church website:
www.pramchurch.org
Registration is as simple as a phone call to the office
for people who don't have email.
October 2021
❖ Sat Oct 23, 3pm Surprised by the Spirit Zoom
❖ Sun Oct 24 Holy Communion Service
Pentecost 22 Celebrant: Rev’d Grace,
Preacher: Peter Lekx
❖ Parish Meeting follows the service
❖ Sat Oct 30, 3pm Surprised by the Spirit at the
church (hall)
❖ Sun Oct 31 Morning Prayer Service with
Holy Baptism. Officiant and Preacher:
Mark Weatherley, Baptismal Celebrant:
Rev’d Grace
Prayer Care: June; Janie and John;
Eileen; Gordona and Leonard;
Brenda; Gary; June; Judy; Nancy; Clara;
Dani; Marlene; Heather and Ture; Michael;
Veta; Betty; Robert; Don; George; Louise;
Sylvia; Alice; Thomas; Margaret; Susan;
Andra; Shelby; Wally; Bruce and Bill; Bryan;
Janet; Catherine.
“On September 12 I attended my first in
church service since last September, as
many others did. I can honestly say that
I didn’t realize I had missed so much
until I was back in church singing to the
glorious hymns that Chris played. It truly
filled my heart and soul with joy.”
- Laura Hill
November 2021
❖ Sun Nov 7** All Saints Sunday and Holy
Baptism **Daylight Savings time ends
❖ Celebrant and Preacher: Rev’d Grace
Pritchard Burson
❖ Sun Nov 14 Remembrance Sunday, Holy
Communion - Celebrant and Preacher:
Rev’d Grace Pritchard Burson
❖ Sun Nov 21 Reign of Christ, Holy
Communion - Celebrant and Preacher:
Rev’d Grace Pritchard Burson
❖ Stump the Incumbent/Anglican Terminology
follows the service
❖ Sun Nov 28 First Sunday of Advent, Holy
Communion - Preacher: Bob McLachlan,
Celebrant: Rev’d Grace Pritchard Burson
❖ Parish meeting follows the service
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Rev’s Writings
We’re welcoming people into God’s family in all kinds of
ways these days!
Just before the pandemic, All Saints was preparing to receive two
new members into the Anglican Church: Marie-Claude Martz and
Rosanne Harrison, both of whom had been confirmed in the
Roman Catholic tradition and wanted to formally affirm their
transition to active membership as Anglicans. Rosanne, of course,
has since moved to Vancouver, where we pray she will find a new
congregation and be received into the Anglican Church in due
time.
Marie-Claude has been patiently waiting along with the rest of us as the lockdown has dragged on,
but we hope soon to be able to contact Bishop Mary and schedule the service!
In the meantime, several of our young people have also reached the age where they can begin
preparing for Confirmation, and we plan to convene a class before the end of the year so that they
can grow to know each other and learn more about the faith that was claimed for them at Baptism.
On October 31, we will baptize Nala Gordon.
On November 7, we will baptize Serena Capplette and her daughter Coralie Trepannier; baptizing
adults and older children is one of my favourite things to do, and this will be a grand celebration on
our parish’s patronal festival. Serena and Coralie then both plan to be confirmed when the Bishop
visits, as well! We will also baptize Catherine Sawoch.
If you have never been confirmed or received into the Anglican Church, this would be a great time
to join one of these groups! Despite the ongoing pandemic, our congregation is strong, and people of
all ages are finding a spiritual home among us. Please pray for those being baptized, confirmed, and
received, and stay tuned for details about the services!
In Christ’s peace,
Grace+
P.S.
On a slightly lighter note, in terms of learning about the Anglican
tradition, look elsewhere in this newsletter for information about a
series of class sessions on “Stump the Incumbent/Anglican
Minutiae” in November and December.
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St. Mark’s Church - The First 30 Years.
After World War 2 the population of Dorval grew rapidly, and it was decided to construct a church
hall to hold the increasing number of activities associated with the chapel. A few years later with
continuing growth, the current church building was constructed and opened in 1958. In 1961 Myra
and I arrived in Dorval from Newfoundland with our son and became parishioners. As with other
young couples of the time, St. Mark’s soon became our family.
At that time, St. Mark’s sponsored a Cub
and Sea Scout group as well as Guides and
Brownies. These met each week in the old
hall (current day care). In addition to the
normal type events for these groups there
was summer camping while the scouts would
head off on their 25-ft sailboat, The Nonsuch,
to the Thousand Islands. The boat could
sleep 6 kids plus an adult, and such were the
numbers that the troop was divided into 3
groups, one to bring the boat up to the
islands, one to sail there for a week and one
to bring the boat home. Another year our scouts attended the large jamboree which took place in
PEI. It is interesting to note that years later at school reunions, people with no affiliation with St.
Mark’s have come up to now adults saying, “I remember you, I was in the scouts or guides with
you.” It is evident that we had a lasting impact on other members of the community.
In Focus
On April 1, 2018, Easter Sunday,
Bishop Mary Irwin-Gibson officiated at
a historic celebration of the
establishment of All Saints by the Lake
Anglican Parish.
The parish has merged congregations of
St. Mark, St. Andrew, St. Paul, and the
Church of the Resurrection over a 50-
year period.
All Saints parishioners share the history
of their former congregations.
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Not to be left out, the adults also provided their own entertainment by forming a group which they
called “The Half and Half Club.” They met on a regular basis and their activities included,
bowling, treasure hunt, masquerade party, fashion show, corn roast, interactive games and a talent
show to name a few. The one event that stands out in our mind was the night of the talent show
when people thought we had been raided by the police, but that’s a story for another time. The
whole idea of the club was to provide activities at little or no cost.
Another event that was much looked forward to, was the annual picnic. This was held either up
north or in a provincial park. It was open to one and all and it seemed all the kids invited their
friends. Indeed, some members made it a weekend event by camping. There was swimming, father-
and-daughter 3 legged races, softball games, frisbee contests, tug of war, sack races and much more
all followed by mountains of food.
After the arrival of the St. Andrew’s parishioners in 1969, our theatrical efforts took a giant leap
forward. Over the following years we performed 3 pantomimes which were written and directed by
a member of the parish. All the costumes and scenery were made by parishioners with all ages
appearing on stage. Performances were held in larger local halls to sold out crowds. The 3
pantomimes were, Cinderella, Goldilocks and Puss and Boots. Members of the cast prepared long
and hard for each of these and as a result, performances were at a very high level. One incident that
stands out in my mind was during a performance of Cinderella. The ugly sisters had departed for
the ball leaving a dejected Cindy to clean up the kitchen. A character called Buttons, was to enter
stage left to console a forlorn Cindy. Buttons’ main purpose in the play was to have the audience
interact with the players. The day of the performance was birthday of the girl playing Cindy.
Unbeknownst to her, Buttons went off script telling those in the hall that it was Cindy’s birthday
and that we should all sing happy birthday to cheer her up. A rousing rendition followed, after
which Cindy looked at the packed house and adlibbed “yes, 16 and I’ve never been kissed”, which
brought the house down.
While writing of the foregoing events, we have made no attempt to include the usual dinners, fall
fairs, garage sales etc., which were also held, but rather outline some of the events which might be
considered less traditional but more family oriented.
Submitted by Myra & Roger Carter
❖ St. Mark, patron saint of…
Saint Mark the Evangelist, author of the Gospel Book of Mark in the Bible, was one of Jesus
Christ's original 12 disciples. He is the patron saint of many different topics, including lions,
lawyers, notaries, opticians, pharmacists, painters, secretaries, interpreters, prisoners, and
people dealing with insect bites.
Source: learnreligions.com
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St. Andrew’s Church, Dorval 1957 - 1969
There is very little that I can write about St. Andrew’s, having joined that parish just prior to the
merger with St. Mark’s. When my husband and I and our two very young children first came to St.
Andrew’s, I was asked to help in the Sunday School which I did. In those years, there was no
interaction between the children “downstairs” and the congregation “upstairs”, and so I had no
knowledge of any events or the activities in the parish that I can relay to you. It was very shortly
after that that the merger was realized: and the Rev. John Isaacs, who was the Rector at St.
Andrew’s, moved, along with his congregation, to amalgamate with that of St. Mark’s.
One might wonder why St. Andrew’s was built since it had such a short lifespan. It is important to
understand that in the years following World War 2, there was a population explosion in Dorval.
To meet the growing needs of the very large Anglican Community, the decision to build the two
churches was deemed necessary and therefore was undertaken. However, within 10 or 11 years, the
demographic situation of the city changed and became such that the community could no longer
support both churches, making merger between the two essential. And so, in 1969, the Parish of St.
Andrew and St. Mark was born.
The building which was St. Andrew’s Church stands on the southwest corner of Carson and
Brookhaven and has become, in the last decade or so, the home of Terra Nova Youth Sports
Center. Also, it is rented, on Sunday mornings, for worship to a Baptist Congregation.
- Submitted by Margaret Beattie
❖ Celebrating St. Andrew in Scotland…
Having Saint Andrew as Scotland's patron saint gave the country several advantages:
because he was the brother of Saint Peter, founder of the Church, the Scots were able to
appeal to the Pope in 1320 (The Declaration of Arbroath) for protection against the
attempts of English kings to conquer the Scots.
Source: Scotland.org
… and in Romania
Girls who want to know who they will marry place basil under their pillows on the night
of November 29 to November 30 the eve and feast of St. Andrew. Basil is also said to keep
the evil spirits away, so people use it when they cook their meals. Basil is also used by
priest of the Orthodox Church for various holidays or moments of mass.
Source: Romania-insider.com
FYI…St. Andrew is also the patron saint of Barbados, Russia, Romania, Greece and
Ukraine.
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St. Paul's Anglican Church, Lachine 1873-2012
The parish had its beginnings in 1873 in private homes under the wing of St. Stephen's Anglican
Church, Lachine. It was not until the Rev. H. Hewton was inducted as rector in 1897 that the
congregation moved into a church building located on 44th Avenue. From 1897 until 1988 the
parish had only four rectors: the Reverends Hewton, Lewis, Marshall and Midlige. The original
building burned to the ground in December 1941 but was quickly rebuilt by 1942.
My memories of St. Paul's begin
at the end of the summer of 1955
when our family moved to
Lachine. The parish was large and
vibrant. Our confirmation class
numbered approximately 45
teenagers. Sunday School had to
be divided into two groups with
each group having its own
superintendent because there were
more than 300 young people.
Each Sunday there were four
worship services.
In 1954 a hall was added to the church to enable the congregation to use the area for many
purposes, but most importantly to ease the crowding in the church.
In the mid-1950s our organist, Mr. A. Gough, established the St. Paul's Operatic Society (today's
Lakeshore Light Opera). The first presentation was Gilbert and Sullivan's “Trial by Jury”.
The Reverend A. Marshall's Corporation was staffed by men, but the women held things together
by organizing the following groups: Shepherding, Little Helpers, Women's Auxiliary, Anglican
Church Women, Church Women's Year, and catering.
When the Rev. Marshall died the Rev. B. Midlige was inducted in Sept. 1962. Soon after the plans
to build a new church were completed, construction began and St. Paul's Anglican Church, Lachine
opened its doors on December 15, 1964.
To assist the Building Fund a church bazaar was reintroduced. By 1977 the mortgage was burnt.
The bazaar was a two-day event that a year to prepare. The following booths were created: Dolls,
Silent Auction, Apartment, Fish Pond, Boutique, Sewing, Knitting, Baking, Woodie's Workshop,
Candy, Art plus a Saturday Soup & Sandwich Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, and a Roast Beef Dinner.
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The Bazaar's Friday roast beef dinner and the Saturday luncheon were planned, created, and
served by the Men's Club and the waiters were appropriately dressed in white shirts, dark trousers,
cummerbund and bow ties.
The Art Group that began as a bazaar booth became a two-day sale and exhibition. This annual
Art Show offered a cultural service to the parish and community and provided an opportunity for
eighty local artists to exhibit their paintings while also financially supporting the parish.
Over the years the parish hosted special services. In March 1968 the largest ordination in the
history of the Diocese was held with 12 priests being ordained. St. Paul's catered for more than 500
for this service. In 1985 St. Paul's was chosen as the site of a service and luncheon in honour of the
visit of the Most Reverend Robert Runcie, Archbishop of Canterbury, and his aide, Archbishop
Terry Waite, and the clergy of the Diocese and their wives. The luncheon was served by the ladies
of the parish.
St. Paul's had many ministries over the years: the Healing Order of St. Luke; the Inuit Ministry for
Inuit patients and their family members coming south for medical services; and a French ministry
in which Rev. Alan Evans catered to the spiritual needs of Haitian parishioners en français. The
entire parish participated in these ministries.
Following Rev. B. Midlige's retirement in 1988, Rev. Alan Evans became the rector of St. Paul's
Church. Alan and his wife, Jane, invested a lot of their time working with the youth of the parish
and in doing so the Sunday School grew and a youth group was formed.
Rev. Ros MacGregor was employed as a curate for two years and Ros oversaw a new group,
W.I.N.G.S, (Women Initiating Growth Successfully). Around the same time an Anti-Racism
Committee was formed to promote dialogue and understanding. In February 1993 our multiracial
and multilingual congregation held a bilingual service and exhibition honouring Black History
Month.
In March 1993 Rev. Alan Evans decided to pursue a teaching career and the Rev. Ros MacGregor
acted as our intern priest until the arrival of the Rev. Barry Clarke.
On November 7, 1993 the Rev. Barry Clarke was inducted at St. Paul's.
In1995 the church hall was dedicated to the Reverend B. A. Midlige and the part of the church that
had once been the original church became known as Hewton Hall.
Rev. Clarke invited Lachine residents to bring their pets to the church to be blessed.
In October 1996 a Seniors Day was organized that began with a service in the chapel followed by a
luncheon.
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Outreach into the community increased. It was reported that 500-600 people were in the church
building weekly for worship and other activities.
From the mid-1970s our congregational numbers were waning but although our numbers were
fewer we were able to continue all the activities.
In 2004 our rector, Barry Clarke was elected Bishop of Montreal. We were all proud.
Until the arrival of Rev. Jeff Hall in 2006, St. Paul's was fortunate to have the services of Rev.
Jeno Kohner and Rev. Gordon Guy.
During this time the Corporation was
making important decisions re our
property (major repairs, cost of
heating, etc.) After many meetings
with the congregation the parishioners
voted to close the church. The
majority of members of the church
decided to transfer to St. Stephen's
Lachine, Trinity Memorial and St.
Andrew and St. Mark's.
Those of us who chose today's All Saints by the Lake were warmly received and are thriving in our
new home.
Submitted by Suzanne Taylor
Photo credits Anglican Samizat and Montreal Gazette
❖ Did you know?
St. Paul learned and enjoyed working with his own hands. He learnt how to make and sell
tents from the time he was a child and into his Youth. He still practiced this even after
converting to Christianity and starting to teach. St. Paul kept his leather-working tools
with him as he travelled and set up shop anywhere.
Source: discoverworks.com
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Church of the Resurrection
During the late 1800's the “Lakeshore” became increasingly popular as a country retreat. In 1920
people had started to move into the Valois area and at that time there were 30 families along with a
much larger summer colony. Around this time the people met in each others’ homes, on lawns and
verandas and even in the Valois boating club.
In spring 1924 Rev J. J. Seaman, (1924-1932), started holding services in the one room school on
Prince Edward Avenue. The first service was held on a glorious sunshiny warm day, Easter Sunday
April 21, 1924. In attendance were a congregation of about 30 people along with Bishop Farthing
who gave the church its name of Church of the Resurrection. Fundraisers started in these early
days of 1924 with the new Women’s Auxiliary being formed and meetings being held in their
homes.
A sum of $350 was soon raised, quite a
large sum for the time. A committee was
formed to consider the purchase of building
lots for a church. Two lots were purchased
on Mount Pleasant Avenue for the sum of
$750. A loan was underwritten by eight
members of the congregation by a
mortgage on their homes. The new
church/hall Seaman’s Hall was completed
on February 4th, 1927. This parish hall
served both as church and parish hall.
The congregation did not change much until after the depression then there was slow growth until
the end of the second world war. By 1941 the demands on the Parish Hall were beginning to
become a problem. A decision was made to install pews in the existing Seaman’s Hall to make it
solely the church and connect it to a temporary building to be set on the adjoining lot. As this was
to be temporary in nature, a second-hand Army Hut was purchased from the War Assets
Corporation on site at Farnham, Quebec for $1,114.32. There was additional cost for its move and
connecting it to the Church (Seaman Hall) for a grand total of $10,277.19. This temporary building
became the church hall. The kitchen was furnished by funds raised by Women’s Auxiliary. Many
Groups were formed and met in the “new” hall. These included the W.A & Guild, St Mary’s Altar
Guild, The Ways & Means Club, The Window Fund Group, Church of the Resurrection Senior &
Junior Players Entertainers, Ladies and Men’s Bowling Groups and B.A.C Men’s Group
(Brotherhood of Anglican Churchmen). The Church Women’s Year was formed in the early 50’s
and then changed to the A.C.W (Anglican Church Women).
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Growth continued and the Parish blossomed with approximately 300 families including 120
children. A need for a new church building became apparent and the building of a new church
building was begun.
In 1960 with Canon A. E. Hawes (1949 to 1965) as Incumbent the new church opened, and the
temporary church hall building was demolished. Canon Mellor followed from 1965-1977. New
Families were moving into Valois and joining the Resurrection and as they started getting to know
each other, they started working on fundraisers and attending social activities together. These
included bazaars, rummage sales, fashion shows, Children’s Fair with pony rides, picnics at Hudson
Beach, Easter and Thanksgiving Dinners, day trips to Canadiana Village, Hudson Home Tours
with lunch at St Mary’s Church, Tea & Topics and later Theme Dinners and Messy Church.
Anniversaries were celebrated not just to mark the passage of time but to sum up the growth that
had been made. The Parish of Church of the Resurrection celebrated the 25th, 75th and 90th
anniversaries of the parish with celebrations, special events, special meals, and special services. Past
parishioners from away were invited to attend. For the 75th anniversary there was even a parade
through the streets of Valois led by a bagpiper.
Church of the Resurrection celebrated the 25th anniversary of the new church building in 1985
with Canon Jeno Kohner (1977 to 1997). In 1989 the original Seaman’s Hall was demolished for
safety reasons.
Canon Bryan Pearce (2003 to 2013) was interim priest in 2009 when Church of the Resurrection
welcomed many parishioners from the recently closed Parish of St. Augustine. Reverend Sophie
Rolland was hired as an assistant to help in the transition.
In 2014 with a dwindling congregation and wishing to be good stewards of their assets Church of
the Resurrection approached and entered negotiations with St. John the Baptist, Pointe Claire for
a possible merger. These talks did not come to fruition.
Later, Church of the Resurrection was approached by St Andrew & St. Mark in Dorval, regarding a
possible merger. After prayerful consultation the two parishes agreed to merge. Church of the
Resurrection closed its doors and celebrated its first service as a new merged church on Easter
Sunday 2018 in Dorval.
The new merged church changed its name to All Saints by the Lake and many items from Church
of the Resurrection including the original altar from 1924, altar hangings, linens, stained glass
window, communion vessels, altar cross, candle sticks, processional crosses, office furniture and hall
and kitchen supplies were brought along and enjoy a new home.
- Submitted by Gladys Randle & Darlene Scott
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The Saints of the Crucifixion and Resurrection
❖ Simon of Cyrene
Simon of Cyrene (modern-day Libya) is described as passing through and then forced to carry
the cross. He likely could have been going to attend the Passover. When we think about long
his journey must have been to Jerusalem, he must have had great anticipation for the Passover
celebration. However, the moment that the cross was placed on his back, he was considered
unclean for the ceremony. How interesting that Simon could have fought for religion, but He
was blessed with the obedience to carry the cross of the Savior.
Source: crosswalk.com
❖ Mary Magdalene
Mary Magdalene had Jesus cast out 7 demons out of her. The Bible doesn’t actually identify
people by their sin or experiences such as this one, mentioning them by name. Mary Magdalene
is one of the ones that the Bible actually mentions by name. The fact that seven demons were
cast out of her might be a reflection of Mary Magdalene’s suffering.
Source: discoverwalks.com
Pearls represent the tears of Mary Magdalene: tears of happiness at being saved by Christ’s love,
tears of repentance for her sins, and sadness from the tragic loss of her family.
Source: stravaganzastravaganzablogspot.com
MARY, THE MOTHER OF JESUS – THE GREATEST OF ALL SAINTS
The Mary moments in the New Testament point to Jesus every time. Her
song, her encounter with Jesus in the temple, her intervention at the
wedding at Cana and her standing at the cross lead us back to Jesus, His
mission, and our salvation. Her life was to witness to the glory of her Son.
Like Mary, all of the saints have led us to Jesus.
May God guide the members of the Anglican Parish of All Saints by the Lake, to be effective
witnesses to the LOVE of Jesus that reconciles us all to God our Father, that affirms our
diversity in service and that leads us to rejoice in the unity of the Holy Spirit!
Photo credit: worthpoint.com
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Sharing our history
❖ Margaret Beattie recounts the St. Mark’s Chapel Tour
The Dorval Historical Society marks Culture And Heritage Day on September 12, 2021
It was a beautiful day. The sun was shining, the weather was
warm, and the balmy breezes were blowing through the
windows that I had opened wide. There were 15 people who
came to hear about the beginnings of this lovely place.
As I began my presentation, I invited our guests to imagine
cows with their doe-eyed stares, poking their heads through
the open windows because apparently, that’s what would
often happen on a summer’s day during Sunday services in
yesteryear! It seems that those four-legged beings were
drawn by the music and that curiosity compelled them to
investigate! Understandably so, I suppose. After all, the
church was on what had been their turf and was built on land
obtained from Mr. Sims, a farmer and large landowner. “All
creatures great and small” most welcome at St. Mark’s!
Of course, those present for the tour entered the chapel by coming down the four steps from the
main church, but I reminded them that in 1898, that was not the entrance but, instead had been
the back wall (which included a window) and that, in fact, the entrance had been through a door
(similar to the one leading into the old sacristy) off to the side through what is now the shed.
Parishioners, one hundred years ago, made their way to the church through the Lych Gate which
symbolized, originally, the passage through to the Holy from the Common, from the Profane to the
Sacred.
The afternoon’s event unfolded in two parts, beginning with Michel Hebert, from the Historical
Society, who had a slide presentation about the origins of Dorval, starting with the first Catholic
Mission in the area, established by the Sulpicians in 1691 and named Gentilly. Mr. Hebert’s
presentation took us from those early beginnings up to about the mid 1800s. My presentation
began with the development of this part of the West Island when it became “cottage country” for
the wealthy Montreal businesspeople, living in what was known as “The Square Mile”. Some of
those prominent people’s names who built homes on the lakeshore were: Molson, Marler, Justice
Tait, Barnes, Lindsay, McAncliffe, and Savage. These were the visionaries who were instrumental
in the founding of St. Mark’s Church.
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When these new “West Islanders” first built homes here, there was, of course, no Anglican church
in the area. And so they met in one another’s homes for their spiritual devotions – one of those
homes being what is now Dorval’s Sarto Desnoyers Community Center and which previously had
been the Elmridge Golf Club and before that, the home of John George Savage, the father of artist
Ann Savage, one of the Beaver Hall Group, artists famous for the portraits of prominent Canadians
in the 1920s.
For the tour, I had placed on display some historical records of letters and photographs as well as
the painting of the original St. Mark’s Church which hangs in the hallway outside Rev. Grace’s
office. And yes, it was called St. Mark’s Church and not St. Mark’s Chapel. It began to be called
St. Mark’s Chapel only after the extension to that little church was built in 1958.
The following is a list of interesting items to which I drew the attention of our visitors: 1) the
portrait of founding member, Henry Markland Molson, who later died in the sinking of the Titanic;
2) the brass plaque, commemorating the first worship service on June 26,1898; 3) a plaque and
photograph, remembering Owen Hague who, as a child and with his family, attended that first
service held here and who later was killed during WW1; 4)another brass plaque to note the
planting of a maple tree on the church lawn to celebrate the coronation of King George V1 in May
1937; 5) yet another plaque to remember Albert Briggs, organist who came weekly from St. Paul’s,
Lachine to play for services here and who, with his family one Sunday on their way to St. Mark’s,
was killed at the railway crossing at 44th Ave., Lachine.
In addition to those five memorials, I pointed out some of the donations, made by a few of the
originating members: 6) the bell, donated by H. M. Molson which is rung, to this day before every
worship service; 7) the toll bell which tolls out at funerals, announcing by the way it is struck, the
gender and age of the deceased; 8) the original altar, donated by Fred Molson (brother of Henry);
and 9) the lectern stand, donated by Mr. McAncliffe. There was interest as well in the cut-out
square of wood in the center of the floor where a wood-burning stove once stood.
As I wrapped up, it occurred to me to make the afternoon memorable for the two pre-teen children
in attendance who showed interest in the bell and asked questions about that thick rope hanging
down through the ceiling, so I offered them both a bell-ringing experience which brought forth
huge smiles and a kind of hard-to-contain enthusiasm! A couple of days later I confessed to Rev.
Grace what I had allowed just in case she was asked the significance of the ringing church bell in
the early afternoon of that Sunday.
I also told the very interested audience that St. Mark’s Church was built of local fieldstone with
construction beginning in 1897 and being completed in 1898 at a cost $3,350.36 on land where,
there is some unconfirmed speculation, an old Sulpician chapel once stood. I read in some of the
documentation I consulted, “One wonders if, possibly, Mr. Sims knew of the previous existence of a
chapel when he sold the land to those founding members.”
- Submitted by Margaret Beattie
For Everything There Is A Season
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❖ Darlene Scott, recounts the role played over the years by Christian Action Chrétienne (CAC)
in the community
Christian Action Chrétienne (CAC) Closes
On August 30, 2021 I attended a meeting for Christian Action Chrétienne (CAC) at Saint John’s
United Church in Pointe Claire. In attendance were members of 4 or 5 other Pointe Claire churches
of differing denominations to discuss the future of CAC, the main topic on the agenda.
CAC was an initiative of Father Emmett “Pops” Johns of “Dans La Rue” fame when he was the
priest at Saint John Fisher Parish in Pointe-Claire. It was originally an ecumenical group of
9 church congregations whose mission was to assist those in need in the Pointe-Claire area. CAC
helped those in need with food, medical supplies and, in some instances, bill payments. The
objective was to assist those who face an economic crisis, and to help individuals and families
become self supporting again. The food bank operated for short term emergencies. Vouchers were
also provided to purchase fresh fruit, vegetables, and meat. The funding for the vouchers was
possible through the generosity of donations of parishioners of the various churches. The food was
from the CAC pantry which parishioners from the various churches in Pointe-Claire help keep
stocked with the non-perishable items brought in at weekend services.
Financially CAC was stable. As in many organizations, it
lacked manpower. The pantry was literally a closet in
Saint John’s United Church. When a request was
received bags were packed with non-perishable items
along with chicken or hamburger and then delivered to
delivered to the client. Volunteers were needed to pack
and deliver the food. Most volunteers were quite elderly
and with COVID, deliveries presented new problems
putting drivers at possible risk.
Another big job was keeping the pantry supplied. While the parish contributions kept the pantry
quite well supplied, there could have been shortages in specific items that had to be bought with
the funds. The funds were there, less so the volunteers.
The long standing president/ main organizer of CAC is in her 80s. She was very concerned about
what would happen to CAC if something happened to her. The attending churches commented that
many were finding support from their parishes becoming more difficult. They did not anticipate
finding volunteers to replace the aging ones. In addition, CAC was over 20 years old. It was formed
to respond to the needs of people requesting help from individual churches. It was a way to
centralize and not duplicate requests in a time when large food banks did not exist in Pointe Claire.
After much painful discussion the decision was made to terminate CAC effective December 31,
2021.
16
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
I received this e-mail from the president. “For all your support keeping CAC going over the years
and thank you for your help and support in deciding to close it’s door. Best to go out standing!”
The West Island now has two major food banks. They are computerized and receive corporate
funding and volunteers. West Island Mission is a non-profit organization that provides well-
balanced, high quality food assistance and other related aid to the less fortunate living in the West
Island of Montreal. It is located in Pointe Claire and has served clients since 2005. In addition
there is On Rock Community Services food bank in Pierrefonds. Clients of CAC will be given the
contact information for these organizations. An advantage is that the client will be able to choose
the food they want while they are there.
What does this mean for us at All Saints by the Lake?
We will continue to collect non-perishable goods for CAC until the end of October as food will be
available to their clients until the end of the year. The remaining funds in the CAC bank account
will be dispersed to the clients in the form of a Christmas cheque replacing Christmas Baskets. It
will be several hundred dollars. We will continue to collect food for Dorval Community Aid, and I
suggest we increase our number of Christmas baskets to 6 since in the past we did 3 for CAC and 3
for Dorval Community Aid.
On behalf of CAC, I wish to thank everyone who has supported the organization in the past. As
written in Ecclesiastes 3:1, “For everything there is a season”. Thanks be to God for the season that
Christian Action Chrétienne lived!
- Submitted by Darlene Scott
17
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Returning to Church
❖ Passports
The Diocese of Montreal has determined that, for the time being, public worship is an essential
service and therefore vaccine passports will not be checked. As far as we know, everyone who is
eligible for the vaccine and attends worship at All Saints' is fully vaccinated. We very strongly
encourage everyone who comes into the church building to be vaccinated, and we request that if
you attend worship and are not vaccinated (for any reason) that you let us know for contact
tracing purposes if necessary.
Thank you for helping to keep us all safe!!
❖ Registration
Registration is as simple as a phone call to the office for people who don't have email. Sunday
in-church attendance has been about half capacity of the maximum 50 people allowable in our
church. So there are lots of spaces available should you decide last minute to attend. It’s
always a good idea to preregister if you can. The deadline to register your attendance for in-
church services is noon Friday. After that please contact Rev'd Grace to confirm your presence:
438-334-0610 gburson@montreal.anglican.ca
For all the Saints, who from their labours rest…
❖ Sunday November 7 - All Saints' Day
We are collecting names of departed loved ones to be read during the service. Please submit
names to Jennifer if you would like your loved ones to be remembered this way.
allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com or 514-631-3601
What’s Happening in YOUR Parish
18
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
To Hear the Church Bells Pealing
❖ Angela Andrews speaks about her return-to-church experience
The ever-present God - present in our living rooms, our laundry rooms, and in our kitchens;
present above all, in our hearts.
So, what does it matter where we worship on a Sunday morning?
I can safely say that for many worshippers around
the world the various technologies, among them
Zoom, are a God-send.
‘No turning back,’ for Zoom, Eventbrite and others
have shown us how it is possible to reach and
include so many more participants in the life of our
churches.
However, many of us who are able, look forward to
the day when we can return safely to worship in church, as much for the Service itself and
experiencing the Eucharist, as for being with fellow parishioners. There is nothing like being
greeted at the doorway, “Oh, there’s Angela,” the buzz of people, the chit-chat, hearing the
church bell, then the silence as we are called to be in the sacred presence. There is nothing like
praying and singing together, nothing like the resounding sound of the organ. Live! All these
longings of mine have been met in the last few weeks.
When the date was announced for a return to in-church worship, I weighed the situation and
determined that I had trust in the Church Corporation and the Priest who had shown us
nothing but careful consideration of all the safety aspects during the past year.
For me, there are no underlying issues to prevent me attending.
I thought it might give continuing energy to the priest and other worship leaders to see faces in
the congregation.
Missing a Sunday here and there, one doesn’t give it much thought for the church is always
there.
So, I went back for the pure joy of going to church on a Sunday morning. I realize it matters to
me more than I thought. And, it is peaceful and beautiful and soul replenishing.
19
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Sing out my soul!
❖ Choir rehearsals resume
The choir is resuming their weekly practices at
7:30pm on Thursdays, and all are invited!!
The Thursdays in October will be treated as ‘open
house’ come-as-you are, no auditions, RSVP’s,
expectations, or commitment requested or required…
we’ll see how things go and take it from there! Our
time together will be a bit more informal as we all get
used to singing together again. Practices will happen in the nave pews, social distanced with
masks, and, for the time being, the choir will continue to sing from within the congregation on
Sunday mornings rather than from the choir stalls. If you’ve got questions or concerns, please
don’t hesitate to give Chris a shout chris_grocholski@yahoo.ca
Be still and know the presence of the Lord!
❖ Meditatio is back!
We meet in the chapel on Mondays at 2:00 PM. This time of prayer includes a short talk by
Lawrence Freeman OSB, the Director of WCCM (The World Community for Christian
Meditation) followed by 20 minutes of meditation. All COVID protocols will be followed. All are
welcome!
If you would like more information, please do not hesitate to contact Stacey Neale
at sj.neale@sympatico.ca or 514-631-9796.
Do you have questions?
❖ “Stump the Incumbent/Anglican Terminology.”
Rev. Grace has had several people recently ask, “Can you tell us about all these weird church
words and what they mean?” So that's exactly what we'll do! After church on November 21,
December 5, and December 12, we'll gather for a Zoom/in person hybrid series on "Stump the
Incumbent/Anglican Terminology." What's the difference between a Lay Reader and an
Executive Archdeacon? Between a chalice and a ciborium? Between a sacristy and a narthex?
Wonder no more! And see if you can come up with a question that Rev. Grace can't answer!
20
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Some good news
❖ Our Finances
As we hope for a return to normal in the not too distant future, we can be thankful that for the
past 2 years, All Saints by the Lake has remained strong financially. This is due in no small
measure to the efforts of the Diocese of Montreal which has made it possible for us to take full
advantage of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) and the Canada Emergency
Wage Subsidy, which ended on September 25th, 2021. Our employees have continued to work
throughout the pandemic with us paying a fraction of their salaries. We have not paid the
monthly Diocesan Assessment since March of 2020.
In October of 2021, we made our first payment. We also received essential rental income from
Centre de la Petite Enfance Dorval, as they have continued to operate throughout the
pandemic with many safety measures in place. Last, but certainly not least, our parishioners
have continued their strong financial support of the parish.
We have completed 3 major building projects during this period of time: 1) an elevator servicing
the main floor and basement; 2) repair of a 30-year problem with water leakage in the tunnel
connecting the main Church with the Back Hall and 3) replacement of the Back Hall roof. The
total cost for these projects was $283,493.
This Thanksgiving, we have much for which to be thankful.
-Submitted by Trevor Smith, Treasurer
❖ Thanksgiving decorations
Thanks to everyone who contributed fresh produce that was donated
to Omega. The church was beautifully decorated by the Altar Guild,
led by Margaret Beatty and assisted by Carol Smith, Joan Kohner
and Marsha Hunter.
❖ Building project
EUREKA: the elevator project is complete, thanks to the Anglican Foundation and
parishioners for their financial support!
Raymond would be happy to take any parishioner for a test run (actually, at the speed it goes,
it might be better to call it a “test walk”)!
21
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Get ready for Christmas and 2022!
❖ Fruitcakes
It’s time to order your fruitcake! Traditional British or Traditional Jamaican style. The cost is
$27 each. Please make your order on the sign up sheet in church or call or email the church
office: 514-631-3601 allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com. If you prefer, your fruitcake can be made
without nuts. Just let us know. They will be ready the first week in December. Thanks to
Marsha and Yvonne for coordinating this fundraiser.
❖ Canadian Church Calendars 2022 are available from the office $5 each.
Voices that touch
❖ An invitation from Barbara Peden
From the giant wooden megaphone broadcasting
messages to Mother Earth to a piece of sacred music for
40 voices, the latest show at the Montreal Museum of Fine
Arts is about communication.
The title, How long does it take one voice to reach
another? came from a line in a poem by Carolyn Forché, a
Catholic poet and activist.
I think you would be inspired and comforted by this
show. I am a volunteer guide and can walk with you
through the exhibit.
The museum is very safe and welcoming, and so is the public transit service into town. I would
be happy to answer any questions you might have.
Barbara Black Peden, 514-867-4976
barbaruss@sympatico.ca
22
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Food for thought
❖ Extract from Lay Reader Yvonne Wakeland’s sermon on August 1, 2021
“Whoever comes to me will never be hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.”
These are comforting words.
I want to tell you a story of the comforting power of bread.
After the Korean War ended, south Korea was left with a large number of children who had been
orphaned by the war. We’ve seen this so many times in areas of conflict and environment disasters
throughout the world, in Vietnam, in Bosnia and other places. In the case of Korea, relief agencies
came in to deal with all the problems that arose in connection with having so many orphan
children. Even though the children had three meals a day provided for them, they were restless and
anxious at night and had difficulty sleeping. As they talked to the children, they discovered that
the children had great anxiety about whether they would have food the next day. To resolve this
problem, the relief workers in one particular orphanage decided that each night when the children
were put to bed, the nurses would put a piece of bread in each child’s hand. The bread was not to be
eaten, it was simply intended to be held by each child as a “security blanket” reminding them that
there would be provision for their daily needs. Sure enough, the bread calmed the children’s anxiety
and helped them to sleep.
“If we want to truly experience God’s grace and
find eternal life, we must eat his bread. That’s
where the nutrients are that keep us spiritually
alive. Bread signifies God’s eternal presence with
us, Jesus’ return to the earth and the establishment
of his kingdom.”
In Moses’ time, the high priests had a table in the temple on which they laid 12 loaves of bread
called “showbread” to represent the 12 tribes of Israel. The loaves were a form of thanksgiving for
God’s constant care and presence. Bread was also used as a peace offering and an offering of first
fruits of tithing. These offerings were called the bread of His Presence. (In Hebrew, the bread “of
his face”). And were made not only to God but also in His presence. Bread can symbolize just about
anything in the Bible, but what it points to most is Jesus Himself.
We use bread in our communion ceremonies to remember Jesus’ work of salvation and redemption
on the cross and to praise him for his constant presence and faithfulness. He is the bread we must
all take if we truly want to find physical, spiritual and eternal life.
The bread which “endures” to eternal life is our relationship with God, which has been made
possible by the incarnation of the Son, the Son himself whom the Father gives for the world.
23
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
A handy way to pray!
❖ Five finger prayers
Read: James 5:13-18
Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other. – James 5:16
Prayer is a conversation with God, not a formula. Yet sometimes we might need to use a
“method” to freshen up our prayer time. We can pray the Psalms or other Scriptures (such as
the Lord’s Prayer), or use the ACTS method (Adoration, Confession, Thanksgiving, and
Supplication). I recently came across this “Five-Finger Prayer” to use as a guide when praying
for others:
• When you fold your hands, the thumb is nearest you. So begin by praying for those
closest to you – your loved ones (Philippians 1:3-5).
• The index finger is the pointer. Pray for those who teach – Bible teachers and preachers,
and those who teach children (1 Thessalonians 5:25).
• The next finger is the tallest. It reminds you to pray for those in authority over you –
national and local leaders and your supervisor at work (1 Timothy 2:1-2).
• The fourth finger is usually the weakest. Pray for those who are in trouble or who are
suffering (James 5:13-16).
• Then comes your little finger. It reminds you of your smallness in relation to God’s
greatness. Ask Him to supply your needs (Philippians 4:6, 19)
- Anne Cetas
Prayer Tip: Always incorporate your church in your prayers – pray for and with the people
Thanks to Elaine Beaumont for submitting this article.
24
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Tree Blessing – Dedicated to Ven. Gordon Guy
Rev. Grace officiates and the
family of Ven. Gordon Guy
participates.
Myrna Guy looks on at the
beautiful Bloodgood Japanese
Maple Tree, planted in memory
and gratitude to Ven. Gordon
Guy who served many years at
St. Andrew & St. Mark, now All
Saints by the Lake
Engraved stone at the foot of
the tree:
“Bloodgood Japanese Maple
Tree
Érable du Japon Bloodgood
Given in loving memory of
the Venerable Gordon Guy
Offert à la douce mémoire du
Vénérable Gordon Guy
1934-2021”
Photo Gallery
25
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
A Trip down Memory Lane –
Church of the Resurrection
Mickey Mouse themed dinner,
commemorating the 85th
anniversary of the Church of
the Resurrection in 2013
Olympic themed dinner.
The Church of the Resurrection’s famous Christmas Bazaar.
26
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Worship and fellowship
Church on the Lawn - Summer 2021 Commissioning Peter Lekx, Pastoral Intern - Sept 17
Children’s area now at the back of the
sanctuary
September 12 reopening Sunday
Uncoffee hour after church Mission control. Our hard working technical team
behind the scenes…or above the scene?…in the loft.
27
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Marsha Hunter took Irene Lambert and Barbara
Peden to lunch on the terrace at Bellissimo, in the
Dorval village. Irene was in good spirits and
enjoyed the outing. She and Wally are being well
looked after at home by their son, Bob. Barbara
took the picture.
Thanksgiving Sunday, 10 October 2021
Thanksgiving altar
Celebrating Marguerite Bray’s 90th birthday!
Gladys Randle, Joan Whattam, Janet Brookman,
and Norma Horner took Marguerite out for lunch
at Le Manoir in Pointe-Claire.
Beautifully arranged baskets of fresh produce were
donated to Omega Resource Centre.
Pet Blessing Sunday – some pets were blessed
virtually! Fall flowers and fruits adorned the church.
28
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
The last word
My dear brothers and sisters in Christ!
There is so much to be thankful for! We have
celebrated Thanksgiving Sunday reflecting on the
on-going challenges of living in these difficult times
but rejoicing in our resilience!
The resilience comes from the faithful presence and
power of the Holy Spirit, working in us and through
us. As we reflect on the history and legacy of the
parishes which have come together to form All
Saints by the Lake, we continue to press forward
knowing that we are not alone.
Your candid feedback in the recent survey convinces
me that The Anchor plays an important role,
supporting our fellowship and the connections we
have with each other.
As you can see, The Anchor has a fresh, new layout.
Some features have been discontinued as we focus on
information you consider most relevant. There is,
however, no shortage of content. Our parishioners
continue to share stories eagerly and
enthusiastically. Thank you for your on-going
interest and contribution to your newsletter!
As the northern autumn approaches, we continue to
see the beauty of scarlet and gold hues that surround
us. Let us hear the Spirit of God in the rustling
leaves and in the rush of water, and be grateful for
God’s grace, goodness, and mercy as we enjoy the
fruits of a generous harvest, give thanks for seeds of
many kinds, sown and multiplied, for the sufficiency
we enjoy.
Yours in His service,
Camille cisaacsmorell@videotron.ca
The Anglican Parish of
All Saints by the Lake
865 Lakeshore Drive
Dorval, QC H9S 2C7
(514) 631-3601
allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com
www.pramchurch.org
Facebook:
Anglican Church of All Saints by the Lake
Incumbent
The Reverend Grace Burson
gburson@montreal.anglican.ca
438-334-0610
Pastoral Intern
Peter Lekx
pglekx@gmail.com
Organist and Choir Director
Chris Grocholski
chris_grocholski@yahoo.ca
Lay Readers
Bob McLachlan, Yvonne
Wakeland, Mark Weatherley
Yvonne Bayne
Rector’s Warden
Raymond Noël
newcons@sympatico.ca
514-697-7636
People’s Warden
Yvonne Bayne
ybayne84@gmail.com
438-969-2046
Parish Administrator
Jennifer Gibb
allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com
514-631-3601
Office Hours: 9:30am - 3:30pm Tuesdays - Fridays

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The Anchor newsletter - Autumn 2021 edition

  • 1. iii Autumn 2021 The Anchor Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Inside This Issue PG. 2 Church Calendar – Events in October and November PG. 3 Rev’s Writings – Welcoming people into God’s family PG. 4 In Focus – Our shared history. Stories of our merged parishes PG.17 What’s Happening in YOUR Parish PG 24 Photo Gallery PG 28 The Last Word 865 Lakeshore Drive Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 T: 514-631-3601 E: allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com www.pramchurch.org
  • 2. 2 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Church Calendar Sunday services at 10am in- church and online Corporation meetings: Wednesdays at noon Evening Prayer: Monday – Saturday Meditatio: Mondays at 2pm in the chapel Messy Church: Fridays at 5:30pm Links to register for services may be found in your weekly email and on the church website: www.pramchurch.org Registration is as simple as a phone call to the office for people who don't have email. October 2021 ❖ Sat Oct 23, 3pm Surprised by the Spirit Zoom ❖ Sun Oct 24 Holy Communion Service Pentecost 22 Celebrant: Rev’d Grace, Preacher: Peter Lekx ❖ Parish Meeting follows the service ❖ Sat Oct 30, 3pm Surprised by the Spirit at the church (hall) ❖ Sun Oct 31 Morning Prayer Service with Holy Baptism. Officiant and Preacher: Mark Weatherley, Baptismal Celebrant: Rev’d Grace Prayer Care: June; Janie and John; Eileen; Gordona and Leonard; Brenda; Gary; June; Judy; Nancy; Clara; Dani; Marlene; Heather and Ture; Michael; Veta; Betty; Robert; Don; George; Louise; Sylvia; Alice; Thomas; Margaret; Susan; Andra; Shelby; Wally; Bruce and Bill; Bryan; Janet; Catherine. “On September 12 I attended my first in church service since last September, as many others did. I can honestly say that I didn’t realize I had missed so much until I was back in church singing to the glorious hymns that Chris played. It truly filled my heart and soul with joy.” - Laura Hill November 2021 ❖ Sun Nov 7** All Saints Sunday and Holy Baptism **Daylight Savings time ends ❖ Celebrant and Preacher: Rev’d Grace Pritchard Burson ❖ Sun Nov 14 Remembrance Sunday, Holy Communion - Celebrant and Preacher: Rev’d Grace Pritchard Burson ❖ Sun Nov 21 Reign of Christ, Holy Communion - Celebrant and Preacher: Rev’d Grace Pritchard Burson ❖ Stump the Incumbent/Anglican Terminology follows the service ❖ Sun Nov 28 First Sunday of Advent, Holy Communion - Preacher: Bob McLachlan, Celebrant: Rev’d Grace Pritchard Burson ❖ Parish meeting follows the service
  • 3. 3 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Rev’s Writings We’re welcoming people into God’s family in all kinds of ways these days! Just before the pandemic, All Saints was preparing to receive two new members into the Anglican Church: Marie-Claude Martz and Rosanne Harrison, both of whom had been confirmed in the Roman Catholic tradition and wanted to formally affirm their transition to active membership as Anglicans. Rosanne, of course, has since moved to Vancouver, where we pray she will find a new congregation and be received into the Anglican Church in due time. Marie-Claude has been patiently waiting along with the rest of us as the lockdown has dragged on, but we hope soon to be able to contact Bishop Mary and schedule the service! In the meantime, several of our young people have also reached the age where they can begin preparing for Confirmation, and we plan to convene a class before the end of the year so that they can grow to know each other and learn more about the faith that was claimed for them at Baptism. On October 31, we will baptize Nala Gordon. On November 7, we will baptize Serena Capplette and her daughter Coralie Trepannier; baptizing adults and older children is one of my favourite things to do, and this will be a grand celebration on our parish’s patronal festival. Serena and Coralie then both plan to be confirmed when the Bishop visits, as well! We will also baptize Catherine Sawoch. If you have never been confirmed or received into the Anglican Church, this would be a great time to join one of these groups! Despite the ongoing pandemic, our congregation is strong, and people of all ages are finding a spiritual home among us. Please pray for those being baptized, confirmed, and received, and stay tuned for details about the services! In Christ’s peace, Grace+ P.S. On a slightly lighter note, in terms of learning about the Anglican tradition, look elsewhere in this newsletter for information about a series of class sessions on “Stump the Incumbent/Anglican Minutiae” in November and December.
  • 4. 4 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing St. Mark’s Church - The First 30 Years. After World War 2 the population of Dorval grew rapidly, and it was decided to construct a church hall to hold the increasing number of activities associated with the chapel. A few years later with continuing growth, the current church building was constructed and opened in 1958. In 1961 Myra and I arrived in Dorval from Newfoundland with our son and became parishioners. As with other young couples of the time, St. Mark’s soon became our family. At that time, St. Mark’s sponsored a Cub and Sea Scout group as well as Guides and Brownies. These met each week in the old hall (current day care). In addition to the normal type events for these groups there was summer camping while the scouts would head off on their 25-ft sailboat, The Nonsuch, to the Thousand Islands. The boat could sleep 6 kids plus an adult, and such were the numbers that the troop was divided into 3 groups, one to bring the boat up to the islands, one to sail there for a week and one to bring the boat home. Another year our scouts attended the large jamboree which took place in PEI. It is interesting to note that years later at school reunions, people with no affiliation with St. Mark’s have come up to now adults saying, “I remember you, I was in the scouts or guides with you.” It is evident that we had a lasting impact on other members of the community. In Focus On April 1, 2018, Easter Sunday, Bishop Mary Irwin-Gibson officiated at a historic celebration of the establishment of All Saints by the Lake Anglican Parish. The parish has merged congregations of St. Mark, St. Andrew, St. Paul, and the Church of the Resurrection over a 50- year period. All Saints parishioners share the history of their former congregations.
  • 5. 5 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Not to be left out, the adults also provided their own entertainment by forming a group which they called “The Half and Half Club.” They met on a regular basis and their activities included, bowling, treasure hunt, masquerade party, fashion show, corn roast, interactive games and a talent show to name a few. The one event that stands out in our mind was the night of the talent show when people thought we had been raided by the police, but that’s a story for another time. The whole idea of the club was to provide activities at little or no cost. Another event that was much looked forward to, was the annual picnic. This was held either up north or in a provincial park. It was open to one and all and it seemed all the kids invited their friends. Indeed, some members made it a weekend event by camping. There was swimming, father- and-daughter 3 legged races, softball games, frisbee contests, tug of war, sack races and much more all followed by mountains of food. After the arrival of the St. Andrew’s parishioners in 1969, our theatrical efforts took a giant leap forward. Over the following years we performed 3 pantomimes which were written and directed by a member of the parish. All the costumes and scenery were made by parishioners with all ages appearing on stage. Performances were held in larger local halls to sold out crowds. The 3 pantomimes were, Cinderella, Goldilocks and Puss and Boots. Members of the cast prepared long and hard for each of these and as a result, performances were at a very high level. One incident that stands out in my mind was during a performance of Cinderella. The ugly sisters had departed for the ball leaving a dejected Cindy to clean up the kitchen. A character called Buttons, was to enter stage left to console a forlorn Cindy. Buttons’ main purpose in the play was to have the audience interact with the players. The day of the performance was birthday of the girl playing Cindy. Unbeknownst to her, Buttons went off script telling those in the hall that it was Cindy’s birthday and that we should all sing happy birthday to cheer her up. A rousing rendition followed, after which Cindy looked at the packed house and adlibbed “yes, 16 and I’ve never been kissed”, which brought the house down. While writing of the foregoing events, we have made no attempt to include the usual dinners, fall fairs, garage sales etc., which were also held, but rather outline some of the events which might be considered less traditional but more family oriented. Submitted by Myra & Roger Carter ❖ St. Mark, patron saint of… Saint Mark the Evangelist, author of the Gospel Book of Mark in the Bible, was one of Jesus Christ's original 12 disciples. He is the patron saint of many different topics, including lions, lawyers, notaries, opticians, pharmacists, painters, secretaries, interpreters, prisoners, and people dealing with insect bites. Source: learnreligions.com
  • 6. 6 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing St. Andrew’s Church, Dorval 1957 - 1969 There is very little that I can write about St. Andrew’s, having joined that parish just prior to the merger with St. Mark’s. When my husband and I and our two very young children first came to St. Andrew’s, I was asked to help in the Sunday School which I did. In those years, there was no interaction between the children “downstairs” and the congregation “upstairs”, and so I had no knowledge of any events or the activities in the parish that I can relay to you. It was very shortly after that that the merger was realized: and the Rev. John Isaacs, who was the Rector at St. Andrew’s, moved, along with his congregation, to amalgamate with that of St. Mark’s. One might wonder why St. Andrew’s was built since it had such a short lifespan. It is important to understand that in the years following World War 2, there was a population explosion in Dorval. To meet the growing needs of the very large Anglican Community, the decision to build the two churches was deemed necessary and therefore was undertaken. However, within 10 or 11 years, the demographic situation of the city changed and became such that the community could no longer support both churches, making merger between the two essential. And so, in 1969, the Parish of St. Andrew and St. Mark was born. The building which was St. Andrew’s Church stands on the southwest corner of Carson and Brookhaven and has become, in the last decade or so, the home of Terra Nova Youth Sports Center. Also, it is rented, on Sunday mornings, for worship to a Baptist Congregation. - Submitted by Margaret Beattie ❖ Celebrating St. Andrew in Scotland… Having Saint Andrew as Scotland's patron saint gave the country several advantages: because he was the brother of Saint Peter, founder of the Church, the Scots were able to appeal to the Pope in 1320 (The Declaration of Arbroath) for protection against the attempts of English kings to conquer the Scots. Source: Scotland.org … and in Romania Girls who want to know who they will marry place basil under their pillows on the night of November 29 to November 30 the eve and feast of St. Andrew. Basil is also said to keep the evil spirits away, so people use it when they cook their meals. Basil is also used by priest of the Orthodox Church for various holidays or moments of mass. Source: Romania-insider.com FYI…St. Andrew is also the patron saint of Barbados, Russia, Romania, Greece and Ukraine.
  • 7. 7 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing St. Paul's Anglican Church, Lachine 1873-2012 The parish had its beginnings in 1873 in private homes under the wing of St. Stephen's Anglican Church, Lachine. It was not until the Rev. H. Hewton was inducted as rector in 1897 that the congregation moved into a church building located on 44th Avenue. From 1897 until 1988 the parish had only four rectors: the Reverends Hewton, Lewis, Marshall and Midlige. The original building burned to the ground in December 1941 but was quickly rebuilt by 1942. My memories of St. Paul's begin at the end of the summer of 1955 when our family moved to Lachine. The parish was large and vibrant. Our confirmation class numbered approximately 45 teenagers. Sunday School had to be divided into two groups with each group having its own superintendent because there were more than 300 young people. Each Sunday there were four worship services. In 1954 a hall was added to the church to enable the congregation to use the area for many purposes, but most importantly to ease the crowding in the church. In the mid-1950s our organist, Mr. A. Gough, established the St. Paul's Operatic Society (today's Lakeshore Light Opera). The first presentation was Gilbert and Sullivan's “Trial by Jury”. The Reverend A. Marshall's Corporation was staffed by men, but the women held things together by organizing the following groups: Shepherding, Little Helpers, Women's Auxiliary, Anglican Church Women, Church Women's Year, and catering. When the Rev. Marshall died the Rev. B. Midlige was inducted in Sept. 1962. Soon after the plans to build a new church were completed, construction began and St. Paul's Anglican Church, Lachine opened its doors on December 15, 1964. To assist the Building Fund a church bazaar was reintroduced. By 1977 the mortgage was burnt. The bazaar was a two-day event that a year to prepare. The following booths were created: Dolls, Silent Auction, Apartment, Fish Pond, Boutique, Sewing, Knitting, Baking, Woodie's Workshop, Candy, Art plus a Saturday Soup & Sandwich Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, and a Roast Beef Dinner.
  • 8. 8 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The Bazaar's Friday roast beef dinner and the Saturday luncheon were planned, created, and served by the Men's Club and the waiters were appropriately dressed in white shirts, dark trousers, cummerbund and bow ties. The Art Group that began as a bazaar booth became a two-day sale and exhibition. This annual Art Show offered a cultural service to the parish and community and provided an opportunity for eighty local artists to exhibit their paintings while also financially supporting the parish. Over the years the parish hosted special services. In March 1968 the largest ordination in the history of the Diocese was held with 12 priests being ordained. St. Paul's catered for more than 500 for this service. In 1985 St. Paul's was chosen as the site of a service and luncheon in honour of the visit of the Most Reverend Robert Runcie, Archbishop of Canterbury, and his aide, Archbishop Terry Waite, and the clergy of the Diocese and their wives. The luncheon was served by the ladies of the parish. St. Paul's had many ministries over the years: the Healing Order of St. Luke; the Inuit Ministry for Inuit patients and their family members coming south for medical services; and a French ministry in which Rev. Alan Evans catered to the spiritual needs of Haitian parishioners en français. The entire parish participated in these ministries. Following Rev. B. Midlige's retirement in 1988, Rev. Alan Evans became the rector of St. Paul's Church. Alan and his wife, Jane, invested a lot of their time working with the youth of the parish and in doing so the Sunday School grew and a youth group was formed. Rev. Ros MacGregor was employed as a curate for two years and Ros oversaw a new group, W.I.N.G.S, (Women Initiating Growth Successfully). Around the same time an Anti-Racism Committee was formed to promote dialogue and understanding. In February 1993 our multiracial and multilingual congregation held a bilingual service and exhibition honouring Black History Month. In March 1993 Rev. Alan Evans decided to pursue a teaching career and the Rev. Ros MacGregor acted as our intern priest until the arrival of the Rev. Barry Clarke. On November 7, 1993 the Rev. Barry Clarke was inducted at St. Paul's. In1995 the church hall was dedicated to the Reverend B. A. Midlige and the part of the church that had once been the original church became known as Hewton Hall. Rev. Clarke invited Lachine residents to bring their pets to the church to be blessed. In October 1996 a Seniors Day was organized that began with a service in the chapel followed by a luncheon.
  • 9. 9 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Outreach into the community increased. It was reported that 500-600 people were in the church building weekly for worship and other activities. From the mid-1970s our congregational numbers were waning but although our numbers were fewer we were able to continue all the activities. In 2004 our rector, Barry Clarke was elected Bishop of Montreal. We were all proud. Until the arrival of Rev. Jeff Hall in 2006, St. Paul's was fortunate to have the services of Rev. Jeno Kohner and Rev. Gordon Guy. During this time the Corporation was making important decisions re our property (major repairs, cost of heating, etc.) After many meetings with the congregation the parishioners voted to close the church. The majority of members of the church decided to transfer to St. Stephen's Lachine, Trinity Memorial and St. Andrew and St. Mark's. Those of us who chose today's All Saints by the Lake were warmly received and are thriving in our new home. Submitted by Suzanne Taylor Photo credits Anglican Samizat and Montreal Gazette ❖ Did you know? St. Paul learned and enjoyed working with his own hands. He learnt how to make and sell tents from the time he was a child and into his Youth. He still practiced this even after converting to Christianity and starting to teach. St. Paul kept his leather-working tools with him as he travelled and set up shop anywhere. Source: discoverworks.com
  • 10. 10 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Church of the Resurrection During the late 1800's the “Lakeshore” became increasingly popular as a country retreat. In 1920 people had started to move into the Valois area and at that time there were 30 families along with a much larger summer colony. Around this time the people met in each others’ homes, on lawns and verandas and even in the Valois boating club. In spring 1924 Rev J. J. Seaman, (1924-1932), started holding services in the one room school on Prince Edward Avenue. The first service was held on a glorious sunshiny warm day, Easter Sunday April 21, 1924. In attendance were a congregation of about 30 people along with Bishop Farthing who gave the church its name of Church of the Resurrection. Fundraisers started in these early days of 1924 with the new Women’s Auxiliary being formed and meetings being held in their homes. A sum of $350 was soon raised, quite a large sum for the time. A committee was formed to consider the purchase of building lots for a church. Two lots were purchased on Mount Pleasant Avenue for the sum of $750. A loan was underwritten by eight members of the congregation by a mortgage on their homes. The new church/hall Seaman’s Hall was completed on February 4th, 1927. This parish hall served both as church and parish hall. The congregation did not change much until after the depression then there was slow growth until the end of the second world war. By 1941 the demands on the Parish Hall were beginning to become a problem. A decision was made to install pews in the existing Seaman’s Hall to make it solely the church and connect it to a temporary building to be set on the adjoining lot. As this was to be temporary in nature, a second-hand Army Hut was purchased from the War Assets Corporation on site at Farnham, Quebec for $1,114.32. There was additional cost for its move and connecting it to the Church (Seaman Hall) for a grand total of $10,277.19. This temporary building became the church hall. The kitchen was furnished by funds raised by Women’s Auxiliary. Many Groups were formed and met in the “new” hall. These included the W.A & Guild, St Mary’s Altar Guild, The Ways & Means Club, The Window Fund Group, Church of the Resurrection Senior & Junior Players Entertainers, Ladies and Men’s Bowling Groups and B.A.C Men’s Group (Brotherhood of Anglican Churchmen). The Church Women’s Year was formed in the early 50’s and then changed to the A.C.W (Anglican Church Women).
  • 11. 11 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Growth continued and the Parish blossomed with approximately 300 families including 120 children. A need for a new church building became apparent and the building of a new church building was begun. In 1960 with Canon A. E. Hawes (1949 to 1965) as Incumbent the new church opened, and the temporary church hall building was demolished. Canon Mellor followed from 1965-1977. New Families were moving into Valois and joining the Resurrection and as they started getting to know each other, they started working on fundraisers and attending social activities together. These included bazaars, rummage sales, fashion shows, Children’s Fair with pony rides, picnics at Hudson Beach, Easter and Thanksgiving Dinners, day trips to Canadiana Village, Hudson Home Tours with lunch at St Mary’s Church, Tea & Topics and later Theme Dinners and Messy Church. Anniversaries were celebrated not just to mark the passage of time but to sum up the growth that had been made. The Parish of Church of the Resurrection celebrated the 25th, 75th and 90th anniversaries of the parish with celebrations, special events, special meals, and special services. Past parishioners from away were invited to attend. For the 75th anniversary there was even a parade through the streets of Valois led by a bagpiper. Church of the Resurrection celebrated the 25th anniversary of the new church building in 1985 with Canon Jeno Kohner (1977 to 1997). In 1989 the original Seaman’s Hall was demolished for safety reasons. Canon Bryan Pearce (2003 to 2013) was interim priest in 2009 when Church of the Resurrection welcomed many parishioners from the recently closed Parish of St. Augustine. Reverend Sophie Rolland was hired as an assistant to help in the transition. In 2014 with a dwindling congregation and wishing to be good stewards of their assets Church of the Resurrection approached and entered negotiations with St. John the Baptist, Pointe Claire for a possible merger. These talks did not come to fruition. Later, Church of the Resurrection was approached by St Andrew & St. Mark in Dorval, regarding a possible merger. After prayerful consultation the two parishes agreed to merge. Church of the Resurrection closed its doors and celebrated its first service as a new merged church on Easter Sunday 2018 in Dorval. The new merged church changed its name to All Saints by the Lake and many items from Church of the Resurrection including the original altar from 1924, altar hangings, linens, stained glass window, communion vessels, altar cross, candle sticks, processional crosses, office furniture and hall and kitchen supplies were brought along and enjoy a new home. - Submitted by Gladys Randle & Darlene Scott
  • 12. 12 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The Saints of the Crucifixion and Resurrection ❖ Simon of Cyrene Simon of Cyrene (modern-day Libya) is described as passing through and then forced to carry the cross. He likely could have been going to attend the Passover. When we think about long his journey must have been to Jerusalem, he must have had great anticipation for the Passover celebration. However, the moment that the cross was placed on his back, he was considered unclean for the ceremony. How interesting that Simon could have fought for religion, but He was blessed with the obedience to carry the cross of the Savior. Source: crosswalk.com ❖ Mary Magdalene Mary Magdalene had Jesus cast out 7 demons out of her. The Bible doesn’t actually identify people by their sin or experiences such as this one, mentioning them by name. Mary Magdalene is one of the ones that the Bible actually mentions by name. The fact that seven demons were cast out of her might be a reflection of Mary Magdalene’s suffering. Source: discoverwalks.com Pearls represent the tears of Mary Magdalene: tears of happiness at being saved by Christ’s love, tears of repentance for her sins, and sadness from the tragic loss of her family. Source: stravaganzastravaganzablogspot.com MARY, THE MOTHER OF JESUS – THE GREATEST OF ALL SAINTS The Mary moments in the New Testament point to Jesus every time. Her song, her encounter with Jesus in the temple, her intervention at the wedding at Cana and her standing at the cross lead us back to Jesus, His mission, and our salvation. Her life was to witness to the glory of her Son. Like Mary, all of the saints have led us to Jesus. May God guide the members of the Anglican Parish of All Saints by the Lake, to be effective witnesses to the LOVE of Jesus that reconciles us all to God our Father, that affirms our diversity in service and that leads us to rejoice in the unity of the Holy Spirit! Photo credit: worthpoint.com
  • 13. 13 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Sharing our history ❖ Margaret Beattie recounts the St. Mark’s Chapel Tour The Dorval Historical Society marks Culture And Heritage Day on September 12, 2021 It was a beautiful day. The sun was shining, the weather was warm, and the balmy breezes were blowing through the windows that I had opened wide. There were 15 people who came to hear about the beginnings of this lovely place. As I began my presentation, I invited our guests to imagine cows with their doe-eyed stares, poking their heads through the open windows because apparently, that’s what would often happen on a summer’s day during Sunday services in yesteryear! It seems that those four-legged beings were drawn by the music and that curiosity compelled them to investigate! Understandably so, I suppose. After all, the church was on what had been their turf and was built on land obtained from Mr. Sims, a farmer and large landowner. “All creatures great and small” most welcome at St. Mark’s! Of course, those present for the tour entered the chapel by coming down the four steps from the main church, but I reminded them that in 1898, that was not the entrance but, instead had been the back wall (which included a window) and that, in fact, the entrance had been through a door (similar to the one leading into the old sacristy) off to the side through what is now the shed. Parishioners, one hundred years ago, made their way to the church through the Lych Gate which symbolized, originally, the passage through to the Holy from the Common, from the Profane to the Sacred. The afternoon’s event unfolded in two parts, beginning with Michel Hebert, from the Historical Society, who had a slide presentation about the origins of Dorval, starting with the first Catholic Mission in the area, established by the Sulpicians in 1691 and named Gentilly. Mr. Hebert’s presentation took us from those early beginnings up to about the mid 1800s. My presentation began with the development of this part of the West Island when it became “cottage country” for the wealthy Montreal businesspeople, living in what was known as “The Square Mile”. Some of those prominent people’s names who built homes on the lakeshore were: Molson, Marler, Justice Tait, Barnes, Lindsay, McAncliffe, and Savage. These were the visionaries who were instrumental in the founding of St. Mark’s Church.
  • 14. 14 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing When these new “West Islanders” first built homes here, there was, of course, no Anglican church in the area. And so they met in one another’s homes for their spiritual devotions – one of those homes being what is now Dorval’s Sarto Desnoyers Community Center and which previously had been the Elmridge Golf Club and before that, the home of John George Savage, the father of artist Ann Savage, one of the Beaver Hall Group, artists famous for the portraits of prominent Canadians in the 1920s. For the tour, I had placed on display some historical records of letters and photographs as well as the painting of the original St. Mark’s Church which hangs in the hallway outside Rev. Grace’s office. And yes, it was called St. Mark’s Church and not St. Mark’s Chapel. It began to be called St. Mark’s Chapel only after the extension to that little church was built in 1958. The following is a list of interesting items to which I drew the attention of our visitors: 1) the portrait of founding member, Henry Markland Molson, who later died in the sinking of the Titanic; 2) the brass plaque, commemorating the first worship service on June 26,1898; 3) a plaque and photograph, remembering Owen Hague who, as a child and with his family, attended that first service held here and who later was killed during WW1; 4)another brass plaque to note the planting of a maple tree on the church lawn to celebrate the coronation of King George V1 in May 1937; 5) yet another plaque to remember Albert Briggs, organist who came weekly from St. Paul’s, Lachine to play for services here and who, with his family one Sunday on their way to St. Mark’s, was killed at the railway crossing at 44th Ave., Lachine. In addition to those five memorials, I pointed out some of the donations, made by a few of the originating members: 6) the bell, donated by H. M. Molson which is rung, to this day before every worship service; 7) the toll bell which tolls out at funerals, announcing by the way it is struck, the gender and age of the deceased; 8) the original altar, donated by Fred Molson (brother of Henry); and 9) the lectern stand, donated by Mr. McAncliffe. There was interest as well in the cut-out square of wood in the center of the floor where a wood-burning stove once stood. As I wrapped up, it occurred to me to make the afternoon memorable for the two pre-teen children in attendance who showed interest in the bell and asked questions about that thick rope hanging down through the ceiling, so I offered them both a bell-ringing experience which brought forth huge smiles and a kind of hard-to-contain enthusiasm! A couple of days later I confessed to Rev. Grace what I had allowed just in case she was asked the significance of the ringing church bell in the early afternoon of that Sunday. I also told the very interested audience that St. Mark’s Church was built of local fieldstone with construction beginning in 1897 and being completed in 1898 at a cost $3,350.36 on land where, there is some unconfirmed speculation, an old Sulpician chapel once stood. I read in some of the documentation I consulted, “One wonders if, possibly, Mr. Sims knew of the previous existence of a chapel when he sold the land to those founding members.” - Submitted by Margaret Beattie For Everything There Is A Season
  • 15. 15 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing ❖ Darlene Scott, recounts the role played over the years by Christian Action Chrétienne (CAC) in the community Christian Action Chrétienne (CAC) Closes On August 30, 2021 I attended a meeting for Christian Action Chrétienne (CAC) at Saint John’s United Church in Pointe Claire. In attendance were members of 4 or 5 other Pointe Claire churches of differing denominations to discuss the future of CAC, the main topic on the agenda. CAC was an initiative of Father Emmett “Pops” Johns of “Dans La Rue” fame when he was the priest at Saint John Fisher Parish in Pointe-Claire. It was originally an ecumenical group of 9 church congregations whose mission was to assist those in need in the Pointe-Claire area. CAC helped those in need with food, medical supplies and, in some instances, bill payments. The objective was to assist those who face an economic crisis, and to help individuals and families become self supporting again. The food bank operated for short term emergencies. Vouchers were also provided to purchase fresh fruit, vegetables, and meat. The funding for the vouchers was possible through the generosity of donations of parishioners of the various churches. The food was from the CAC pantry which parishioners from the various churches in Pointe-Claire help keep stocked with the non-perishable items brought in at weekend services. Financially CAC was stable. As in many organizations, it lacked manpower. The pantry was literally a closet in Saint John’s United Church. When a request was received bags were packed with non-perishable items along with chicken or hamburger and then delivered to delivered to the client. Volunteers were needed to pack and deliver the food. Most volunteers were quite elderly and with COVID, deliveries presented new problems putting drivers at possible risk. Another big job was keeping the pantry supplied. While the parish contributions kept the pantry quite well supplied, there could have been shortages in specific items that had to be bought with the funds. The funds were there, less so the volunteers. The long standing president/ main organizer of CAC is in her 80s. She was very concerned about what would happen to CAC if something happened to her. The attending churches commented that many were finding support from their parishes becoming more difficult. They did not anticipate finding volunteers to replace the aging ones. In addition, CAC was over 20 years old. It was formed to respond to the needs of people requesting help from individual churches. It was a way to centralize and not duplicate requests in a time when large food banks did not exist in Pointe Claire. After much painful discussion the decision was made to terminate CAC effective December 31, 2021.
  • 16. 16 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing I received this e-mail from the president. “For all your support keeping CAC going over the years and thank you for your help and support in deciding to close it’s door. Best to go out standing!” The West Island now has two major food banks. They are computerized and receive corporate funding and volunteers. West Island Mission is a non-profit organization that provides well- balanced, high quality food assistance and other related aid to the less fortunate living in the West Island of Montreal. It is located in Pointe Claire and has served clients since 2005. In addition there is On Rock Community Services food bank in Pierrefonds. Clients of CAC will be given the contact information for these organizations. An advantage is that the client will be able to choose the food they want while they are there. What does this mean for us at All Saints by the Lake? We will continue to collect non-perishable goods for CAC until the end of October as food will be available to their clients until the end of the year. The remaining funds in the CAC bank account will be dispersed to the clients in the form of a Christmas cheque replacing Christmas Baskets. It will be several hundred dollars. We will continue to collect food for Dorval Community Aid, and I suggest we increase our number of Christmas baskets to 6 since in the past we did 3 for CAC and 3 for Dorval Community Aid. On behalf of CAC, I wish to thank everyone who has supported the organization in the past. As written in Ecclesiastes 3:1, “For everything there is a season”. Thanks be to God for the season that Christian Action Chrétienne lived! - Submitted by Darlene Scott
  • 17. 17 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Returning to Church ❖ Passports The Diocese of Montreal has determined that, for the time being, public worship is an essential service and therefore vaccine passports will not be checked. As far as we know, everyone who is eligible for the vaccine and attends worship at All Saints' is fully vaccinated. We very strongly encourage everyone who comes into the church building to be vaccinated, and we request that if you attend worship and are not vaccinated (for any reason) that you let us know for contact tracing purposes if necessary. Thank you for helping to keep us all safe!! ❖ Registration Registration is as simple as a phone call to the office for people who don't have email. Sunday in-church attendance has been about half capacity of the maximum 50 people allowable in our church. So there are lots of spaces available should you decide last minute to attend. It’s always a good idea to preregister if you can. The deadline to register your attendance for in- church services is noon Friday. After that please contact Rev'd Grace to confirm your presence: 438-334-0610 gburson@montreal.anglican.ca For all the Saints, who from their labours rest… ❖ Sunday November 7 - All Saints' Day We are collecting names of departed loved ones to be read during the service. Please submit names to Jennifer if you would like your loved ones to be remembered this way. allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com or 514-631-3601 What’s Happening in YOUR Parish
  • 18. 18 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing To Hear the Church Bells Pealing ❖ Angela Andrews speaks about her return-to-church experience The ever-present God - present in our living rooms, our laundry rooms, and in our kitchens; present above all, in our hearts. So, what does it matter where we worship on a Sunday morning? I can safely say that for many worshippers around the world the various technologies, among them Zoom, are a God-send. ‘No turning back,’ for Zoom, Eventbrite and others have shown us how it is possible to reach and include so many more participants in the life of our churches. However, many of us who are able, look forward to the day when we can return safely to worship in church, as much for the Service itself and experiencing the Eucharist, as for being with fellow parishioners. There is nothing like being greeted at the doorway, “Oh, there’s Angela,” the buzz of people, the chit-chat, hearing the church bell, then the silence as we are called to be in the sacred presence. There is nothing like praying and singing together, nothing like the resounding sound of the organ. Live! All these longings of mine have been met in the last few weeks. When the date was announced for a return to in-church worship, I weighed the situation and determined that I had trust in the Church Corporation and the Priest who had shown us nothing but careful consideration of all the safety aspects during the past year. For me, there are no underlying issues to prevent me attending. I thought it might give continuing energy to the priest and other worship leaders to see faces in the congregation. Missing a Sunday here and there, one doesn’t give it much thought for the church is always there. So, I went back for the pure joy of going to church on a Sunday morning. I realize it matters to me more than I thought. And, it is peaceful and beautiful and soul replenishing.
  • 19. 19 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Sing out my soul! ❖ Choir rehearsals resume The choir is resuming their weekly practices at 7:30pm on Thursdays, and all are invited!! The Thursdays in October will be treated as ‘open house’ come-as-you are, no auditions, RSVP’s, expectations, or commitment requested or required… we’ll see how things go and take it from there! Our time together will be a bit more informal as we all get used to singing together again. Practices will happen in the nave pews, social distanced with masks, and, for the time being, the choir will continue to sing from within the congregation on Sunday mornings rather than from the choir stalls. If you’ve got questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to give Chris a shout chris_grocholski@yahoo.ca Be still and know the presence of the Lord! ❖ Meditatio is back! We meet in the chapel on Mondays at 2:00 PM. This time of prayer includes a short talk by Lawrence Freeman OSB, the Director of WCCM (The World Community for Christian Meditation) followed by 20 minutes of meditation. All COVID protocols will be followed. All are welcome! If you would like more information, please do not hesitate to contact Stacey Neale at sj.neale@sympatico.ca or 514-631-9796. Do you have questions? ❖ “Stump the Incumbent/Anglican Terminology.” Rev. Grace has had several people recently ask, “Can you tell us about all these weird church words and what they mean?” So that's exactly what we'll do! After church on November 21, December 5, and December 12, we'll gather for a Zoom/in person hybrid series on "Stump the Incumbent/Anglican Terminology." What's the difference between a Lay Reader and an Executive Archdeacon? Between a chalice and a ciborium? Between a sacristy and a narthex? Wonder no more! And see if you can come up with a question that Rev. Grace can't answer!
  • 20. 20 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Some good news ❖ Our Finances As we hope for a return to normal in the not too distant future, we can be thankful that for the past 2 years, All Saints by the Lake has remained strong financially. This is due in no small measure to the efforts of the Diocese of Montreal which has made it possible for us to take full advantage of the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) and the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy, which ended on September 25th, 2021. Our employees have continued to work throughout the pandemic with us paying a fraction of their salaries. We have not paid the monthly Diocesan Assessment since March of 2020. In October of 2021, we made our first payment. We also received essential rental income from Centre de la Petite Enfance Dorval, as they have continued to operate throughout the pandemic with many safety measures in place. Last, but certainly not least, our parishioners have continued their strong financial support of the parish. We have completed 3 major building projects during this period of time: 1) an elevator servicing the main floor and basement; 2) repair of a 30-year problem with water leakage in the tunnel connecting the main Church with the Back Hall and 3) replacement of the Back Hall roof. The total cost for these projects was $283,493. This Thanksgiving, we have much for which to be thankful. -Submitted by Trevor Smith, Treasurer ❖ Thanksgiving decorations Thanks to everyone who contributed fresh produce that was donated to Omega. The church was beautifully decorated by the Altar Guild, led by Margaret Beatty and assisted by Carol Smith, Joan Kohner and Marsha Hunter. ❖ Building project EUREKA: the elevator project is complete, thanks to the Anglican Foundation and parishioners for their financial support! Raymond would be happy to take any parishioner for a test run (actually, at the speed it goes, it might be better to call it a “test walk”)!
  • 21. 21 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Get ready for Christmas and 2022! ❖ Fruitcakes It’s time to order your fruitcake! Traditional British or Traditional Jamaican style. The cost is $27 each. Please make your order on the sign up sheet in church or call or email the church office: 514-631-3601 allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com. If you prefer, your fruitcake can be made without nuts. Just let us know. They will be ready the first week in December. Thanks to Marsha and Yvonne for coordinating this fundraiser. ❖ Canadian Church Calendars 2022 are available from the office $5 each. Voices that touch ❖ An invitation from Barbara Peden From the giant wooden megaphone broadcasting messages to Mother Earth to a piece of sacred music for 40 voices, the latest show at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts is about communication. The title, How long does it take one voice to reach another? came from a line in a poem by Carolyn Forché, a Catholic poet and activist. I think you would be inspired and comforted by this show. I am a volunteer guide and can walk with you through the exhibit. The museum is very safe and welcoming, and so is the public transit service into town. I would be happy to answer any questions you might have. Barbara Black Peden, 514-867-4976 barbaruss@sympatico.ca
  • 22. 22 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Food for thought ❖ Extract from Lay Reader Yvonne Wakeland’s sermon on August 1, 2021 “Whoever comes to me will never be hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.” These are comforting words. I want to tell you a story of the comforting power of bread. After the Korean War ended, south Korea was left with a large number of children who had been orphaned by the war. We’ve seen this so many times in areas of conflict and environment disasters throughout the world, in Vietnam, in Bosnia and other places. In the case of Korea, relief agencies came in to deal with all the problems that arose in connection with having so many orphan children. Even though the children had three meals a day provided for them, they were restless and anxious at night and had difficulty sleeping. As they talked to the children, they discovered that the children had great anxiety about whether they would have food the next day. To resolve this problem, the relief workers in one particular orphanage decided that each night when the children were put to bed, the nurses would put a piece of bread in each child’s hand. The bread was not to be eaten, it was simply intended to be held by each child as a “security blanket” reminding them that there would be provision for their daily needs. Sure enough, the bread calmed the children’s anxiety and helped them to sleep. “If we want to truly experience God’s grace and find eternal life, we must eat his bread. That’s where the nutrients are that keep us spiritually alive. Bread signifies God’s eternal presence with us, Jesus’ return to the earth and the establishment of his kingdom.” In Moses’ time, the high priests had a table in the temple on which they laid 12 loaves of bread called “showbread” to represent the 12 tribes of Israel. The loaves were a form of thanksgiving for God’s constant care and presence. Bread was also used as a peace offering and an offering of first fruits of tithing. These offerings were called the bread of His Presence. (In Hebrew, the bread “of his face”). And were made not only to God but also in His presence. Bread can symbolize just about anything in the Bible, but what it points to most is Jesus Himself. We use bread in our communion ceremonies to remember Jesus’ work of salvation and redemption on the cross and to praise him for his constant presence and faithfulness. He is the bread we must all take if we truly want to find physical, spiritual and eternal life. The bread which “endures” to eternal life is our relationship with God, which has been made possible by the incarnation of the Son, the Son himself whom the Father gives for the world.
  • 23. 23 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing A handy way to pray! ❖ Five finger prayers Read: James 5:13-18 Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other. – James 5:16 Prayer is a conversation with God, not a formula. Yet sometimes we might need to use a “method” to freshen up our prayer time. We can pray the Psalms or other Scriptures (such as the Lord’s Prayer), or use the ACTS method (Adoration, Confession, Thanksgiving, and Supplication). I recently came across this “Five-Finger Prayer” to use as a guide when praying for others: • When you fold your hands, the thumb is nearest you. So begin by praying for those closest to you – your loved ones (Philippians 1:3-5). • The index finger is the pointer. Pray for those who teach – Bible teachers and preachers, and those who teach children (1 Thessalonians 5:25). • The next finger is the tallest. It reminds you to pray for those in authority over you – national and local leaders and your supervisor at work (1 Timothy 2:1-2). • The fourth finger is usually the weakest. Pray for those who are in trouble or who are suffering (James 5:13-16). • Then comes your little finger. It reminds you of your smallness in relation to God’s greatness. Ask Him to supply your needs (Philippians 4:6, 19) - Anne Cetas Prayer Tip: Always incorporate your church in your prayers – pray for and with the people Thanks to Elaine Beaumont for submitting this article.
  • 24. 24 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Tree Blessing – Dedicated to Ven. Gordon Guy Rev. Grace officiates and the family of Ven. Gordon Guy participates. Myrna Guy looks on at the beautiful Bloodgood Japanese Maple Tree, planted in memory and gratitude to Ven. Gordon Guy who served many years at St. Andrew & St. Mark, now All Saints by the Lake Engraved stone at the foot of the tree: “Bloodgood Japanese Maple Tree Érable du Japon Bloodgood Given in loving memory of the Venerable Gordon Guy Offert à la douce mémoire du Vénérable Gordon Guy 1934-2021” Photo Gallery
  • 25. 25 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing A Trip down Memory Lane – Church of the Resurrection Mickey Mouse themed dinner, commemorating the 85th anniversary of the Church of the Resurrection in 2013 Olympic themed dinner. The Church of the Resurrection’s famous Christmas Bazaar.
  • 26. 26 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Worship and fellowship Church on the Lawn - Summer 2021 Commissioning Peter Lekx, Pastoral Intern - Sept 17 Children’s area now at the back of the sanctuary September 12 reopening Sunday Uncoffee hour after church Mission control. Our hard working technical team behind the scenes…or above the scene?…in the loft.
  • 27. 27 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Marsha Hunter took Irene Lambert and Barbara Peden to lunch on the terrace at Bellissimo, in the Dorval village. Irene was in good spirits and enjoyed the outing. She and Wally are being well looked after at home by their son, Bob. Barbara took the picture. Thanksgiving Sunday, 10 October 2021 Thanksgiving altar Celebrating Marguerite Bray’s 90th birthday! Gladys Randle, Joan Whattam, Janet Brookman, and Norma Horner took Marguerite out for lunch at Le Manoir in Pointe-Claire. Beautifully arranged baskets of fresh produce were donated to Omega Resource Centre. Pet Blessing Sunday – some pets were blessed virtually! Fall flowers and fruits adorned the church.
  • 28. 28 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The last word My dear brothers and sisters in Christ! There is so much to be thankful for! We have celebrated Thanksgiving Sunday reflecting on the on-going challenges of living in these difficult times but rejoicing in our resilience! The resilience comes from the faithful presence and power of the Holy Spirit, working in us and through us. As we reflect on the history and legacy of the parishes which have come together to form All Saints by the Lake, we continue to press forward knowing that we are not alone. Your candid feedback in the recent survey convinces me that The Anchor plays an important role, supporting our fellowship and the connections we have with each other. As you can see, The Anchor has a fresh, new layout. Some features have been discontinued as we focus on information you consider most relevant. There is, however, no shortage of content. Our parishioners continue to share stories eagerly and enthusiastically. Thank you for your on-going interest and contribution to your newsletter! As the northern autumn approaches, we continue to see the beauty of scarlet and gold hues that surround us. Let us hear the Spirit of God in the rustling leaves and in the rush of water, and be grateful for God’s grace, goodness, and mercy as we enjoy the fruits of a generous harvest, give thanks for seeds of many kinds, sown and multiplied, for the sufficiency we enjoy. Yours in His service, Camille cisaacsmorell@videotron.ca The Anglican Parish of All Saints by the Lake 865 Lakeshore Drive Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 (514) 631-3601 allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com www.pramchurch.org Facebook: Anglican Church of All Saints by the Lake Incumbent The Reverend Grace Burson gburson@montreal.anglican.ca 438-334-0610 Pastoral Intern Peter Lekx pglekx@gmail.com Organist and Choir Director Chris Grocholski chris_grocholski@yahoo.ca Lay Readers Bob McLachlan, Yvonne Wakeland, Mark Weatherley Yvonne Bayne Rector’s Warden Raymond Noël newcons@sympatico.ca 514-697-7636 People’s Warden Yvonne Bayne ybayne84@gmail.com 438-969-2046 Parish Administrator Jennifer Gibb allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 514-631-3601 Office Hours: 9:30am - 3:30pm Tuesdays - Fridays