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The Anchor Winter 2021 edition

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iii
Winter 2021
The Anchor
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Inside This Issue
PG. 2 Church Calendar – Events in Dec 202...
2
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Church Calendar
Sunday services at 10am in-
church and online
Morning Prayer/Bible S...
3
Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing
Rev’s Writings
Pray without ceasing
In the last few days, this phrase has come up ov...
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The Anchor Winter 2021 edition

  1. 1. iii Winter 2021 The Anchor Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Inside This Issue PG. 2 Church Calendar – Events in Dec 2021 & Jan 2022 PG. 3 Rev’s Writings – Pray without ceasing PG. 4 In Focus – Celebrations and Commemorations in Fall & Winter PG.16 What’s Happening in yOUR Parish PG 19 Photo Gallery – Looking Back at the Things we Looked Forward to in 2021 PG 26 The Last Word – A New Year. A New Beginning. 865 Lakeshore Drive Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 T: 514-631-3601 E: allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com www.pramchurch.org
  2. 2. 2 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Church Calendar Sunday services at 10am in- church and online Morning Prayer/Bible Study Wednesdays 10am via Zoom and in-church until Dec 22nds, resumes Jan 5th Corporation meetings: Wednesdays at noon Evening Prayer: Monday through Saturday 5pm, except for Fridays when the service begins at 4:45pm Meditatio: Mondays at 2pm in the chapel Messy Church: Fridays at 5:30pm on Zoom until Dec 10th, resumes Jan 7th Links for services may be found in your weekly email and on the church website: www.pramchurch.org December 2021 ❖ Sun Dec 12 Advent 3 Holy Eucharist, preacher Peter Lekx, followed by "Stump the Incumbent" ❖ Sun Dec 12 Lessons and Carols, 4pm, followed by the draw. In-church seating is full. ❖ Sat Dec 18 Parish Christmas Caroling, at 11:30am, details to follow ❖ Sun Dec 19 Advent 4 ❖ Fri Dec 24 Christmas Eve Services; 4pm and 10pm with carols at 9:30pm ❖ Sat Dec 25 Christmas Day – no service at All Saints by the Lake. 10am Holy Communion service at St Georges, Ste Anne de Bellevue ❖ Sun Dec 26 Christmas 1, 10am service Christmas Lessons & Carols with Eucharist PLEASE NOTE Please note that you do not need to register to attend services anymore, except for the two Christmas Eve services, when seating is limited. You can leave a message with the church office. allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 514-631-3601. The church office will be closed for the holidays Friday December 24 and reopen on Tues Jan 4, 2022. January 2022 – preaching schedule Rev’d Grace will be the officiant and preacher unless otherwise indicated below ❖ Sun Jan 2 Epiphany, Holy Eucharist, Rev’d Terry Hidichuk, officiant and preacher ❖ Sun Jan 30 Morning Prayer, Epiphany 4, officiant and preacher Peter Lekx Prayer care June; Janie and John; Eileen; Gordona and Leonard; Brenda; Gary; June; Judy; Nancy; Clara; Dani; Marlene; Heather and Ture; Michael; Veta; Betty; Robert; Don; George; Louise; Sylvia; Alice; Thomas; Margaret; Susan; Andra; Shelby; Bruce and Bill; Bryan; Christiane and Stephen; Gordon; Anne; David.
  3. 3. 3 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Rev’s Writings Pray without ceasing In the last few days, this phrase has come up over and over. The Evening Prayer group, deciding to continue to meet over the holidays (except for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day), is committing itself to continuing its pattern of constant prayer. In the readings for Advent III, Paul tells the Philippians to “rejoice in the Lord always” and also, “in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.” The Bible study group, discussing the passage, discerned that Paul is telling us, again, to pray without ceasing (the phrase itself actually occurs in the first letter to the Thessalonians) – both when we are rejoicing and when we are afraid. Unceasing prayer may sound like a difficult challenge, but it’s not a habit we need to attain all at once. Whenever we have a moment, we can stop, notice our breath going in and out, and remind ourselves that God is as close to us as breathing. This is in itself a form of prayer and can also prompt us then to share with God our hopes, fears, joys, and sorrows. The Advent season is a time of contrasts: we cry out with longing to be delivered at the same time that we rejoice to see God’s promises fulfilled in the coming of Jesus. Both the longing and rejoicing are forms of prayer. This Advent, pray without ceasing – and join your church family for worship together as we celebrate the coming of the Christ child. In God’s peace, Grace+ P.S. Click here to read my report to the November 28 Parish Meeting.
  4. 4. 4 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The Autumn Triduum – Halloween, All Saints & All Souls All Hallows’ Eve, All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day form a triduum – a three-day cycle of feasts – that mirrors and balances the better-known spring Triduum of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Great and Holy Saturday. In Focus Celebrations & Commemorations in Fall & Winter The Autumn Triduum – Halloween, All Saints and All Souls The Reformation Advent Christmas Fra Angelico, “The Forerunners of Christ with Saints and Martyrs”.
  5. 5. 5 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing At dusk on a Saturday just about exactly twenty-eight years ago, I happened to find myself, with my mother and younger sister, outside the main doors of Trinity Episcopal Church on the Green in New Haven. Trinity was not our church; we went to what was then St. Paul’s, a few blocks down the street (yes, New Haven, like the West Island, has too many Episcopal/Anglican churches). St. Paul’s, at that point, was six months into a painful exile from our sanctuary, because during the previous Holy Week the roof of the nave had been discovered to be on the verge of collapsing. We had been worshiping in the parish hall since then, with an upright piano as the only accompaniment to our hymn singing, and we were all feeling a bit bruised. After the event at Trinity that afternoon, we had to load some things into my mother’s car, and as we were bringing out the last load, with the doors into the sanctuary still propped open, the organist began to practice inside. And what he struck up as a warm-up was – unsurprisingly – Sine nomine, the tune of the hymn “For all the saints.” And the three of us looked at each other and began to sing, from memory, and we kept it up either until we had sung all eight verses or until the organist switched to something else (I suspect the latter). We all still remember that moment, and the great gift that Trinity’s organist – who was presumably totally unaware we were there – bestowed upon us, in the form of a blast of organ music to tide us over as we faced All Saints’ Sunday the next day, in the parish hall, with the upright piano. But I think the vast majority of people would hear that story with bemusement. If the time of year had been December, and the organ tune a Christmas carol – or even springtime and an Easter hymn – perhaps they would understand. But All Saints’? Is that really such a big deal? I think it is. At Christmas, we remember that Jesus came to share our human life; at Easter, we rejoice that because he did so, our human life is taken up into God’s resurrection life. But All Saints’ takes it one crucial step further: it shows that resurrection life carried forward into the millennia of human history that have come since Christ ascended into heaven, and it extends the promise forward into eternity, for each and every one of us. Halloween – All Hallows’ Eve, the eve of All Saints – comes under fire from both pagans, who accuse Christians of stealing it, and Christians who think that it’s a satanic celebration that believers should avoid. All Hallows’ Eve, All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day form a triduum – a three-day cycle of feasts – that mirrors and balances the better-known spring Triduum of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Great and Holy Saturday.
  6. 6. 6 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing In the spring Triduum, we rejoice in the Resurrection; the autumn Triduum, we claim it as our own, and in the face of the gathering dark, the cold, the death of everything in the landscape around us, we insist that our Christian hope promises a glorious future in which we will see God face to face and be reunited with all those who have gone before us in faith. And Halloween is an essential part of this observance; it is the Good Friday of the Autumn Triduum, but instead of bowing in awe before the mystery of death in the form of God dying on the cross, instead we ape, mock, and dress up as the things we fear most, inhabiting them and then shucking off the disguise: thereby robbing the ghosts, skeletons, zombies and demons of their power, reassuring ourselves that we are not spooks, but saints. On All Saints’ Day, we revere the great heroes of the faith, those capital-S Saints who are known to us by name across the ages; and on All Souls’ Day, we celebrate the whole body of Christ, all the faithful departed, including both our own beloved dead, and those innumerable saints whose names are known only to God. O blest communion, fellowship divine! We feebly struggle, they in glory shine. Yet all are one in thee, for all are thine: Alleluia! Alleluia! Published by Rev. Grace Pritchard Burson www.gracepritchardburson.net
  7. 7. 7 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The Reformation – the birth of Protestantism The Protestant Reformation was a religious reform movement that swept through Europe in the 1500s. It resulted in the creation of a branch of Christianity called Protestantism, a name used collectively to refer to the many religious groups that separated from the Roman Catholic Church due to differences in doctrine. The Protestant Reformation began in Wittenberg, Germany, on October 31, 1517, when Martin Luther, a teacher, and a monk, published a document he called Disputation on the Power of Indulgences, or 95 Theses. The document was a series of 95 ideas about Christianity that he invited people to debate with him. These ideas were controversial because they directly contradicted the Catholic Church's teachings. Luther's statements challenged the Catholic Church's role as intermediary between people and God, specifically when it came to the indulgence system, which in part allowed people to purchase a certificate of pardon for the punishment of their sins. Summoned to the Diet of Worms (Assembly in Worms, Germany), Luther argued against the practice of buying or earning forgiveness, believing instead that salvation is a gift God gives to those who have faith. Luther's objections to the indulgence system paved the way for other challenges to the Catholic doctrine throughout Europe. For example, John Calvin in France and Huldrych Zwingli in Switzerland proposed new ideas about the practice of Holy Communion, and a group called Anabaptists rejected the idea that infants should be baptized in favor of the notion that baptism was reserved for adult Christians. Broadly speaking, most of the challenges to the Catholic Church revolved around the notion that individual believers should be less dependent on the Catholic Church, and its pope and priests, for spiritual guidance and salvation. Instead, Protestants believed people should be independent in their relationship with God, taking personal responsibility for their faith and referring directly to the Bible, the Christian holy book, for spiritual wisdom. Source: The National Geographic Resource Library https://www.nationalgeographic.org/article/protestant-reformation/ Photo of a painting of Martin Luther at the Diet of Worms Photograph from World History Archive/Alamy stock photo Source: National Geographic
  8. 8. 8 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The English Reformation – the birth of the Anglican Church The English Reformation began with Henry VIII of England (r. 1509-1547 CE) and continued in stages over the rest of the 16th century CE. The process witnessed the break away from the Catholic Church headed by the Pope in Rome. The origins of the English Reformation were political and they went back to the reign of Henry VII of England (r. 1485-1509 CE). Henry arranged for his eldest son Arthur (b. 1486 CE) to marry the Spanish princess Catherine of Aragon (1485-1536 CE), daughter of King Ferdinand II of Aragon (r. 1479-1516 CE), a union which took place in 1501 CE. It was a useful diplomatic tie and Catherine brought with her a large dowry. Unfortunately, Arthur died the next year aged just 15 but Henry VII was keen to maintain friendly relations with Spain and so his second son, Prince Henry (b. 1491 CE), after special permission was gained from the Pope, was betrothed to Catherine. When Henry VII died of in April 1509 CE, Prince Henry became king. As arranged, he married Catherine on 11 June and was crowned Henry VIII in Westminster Abbey on 24 June 1509 CE. The marriage was initially a happy one and produced six children but all except one died in infancy. The sole survivor was Mary, born on 18 February 1516 CE. Now over 40, it seemed Catherine's chances of bearing a healthy son were slim. Henry VIII thought this was a sign of divine judgment against him for disobeying Leviticus 18:16. 'Do not have sexual relations with your brother's wife; that would dishonor your brother.’ In 1527, Henry appealed to Pope Clement VII to annul the marriage. The Pope declined, his predecessor having already granted Henry the special dispensation for his current marriage. Of course, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V was the nephew of Catherine, and the pope feared the political consequences of granting the annulment. However, Henry continued to press his case. Taking a suggestion from the theologian Thomas Cranmer, Henry sought the advice from the universities of Europe to discern whether an annulment was warranted. Cranmer’s instincts were right; the scholars of Europe believed Henry and Catherine’s marriage should have never occurred in the first place. Cranmer was made the Archbishop of Canterbury (highest-ranking bishop in the Church of England) in 1532, declared the marriage “invalid” in 1533, and became the first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury when the king removed England from the Pope’s jurisdiction in 1534. Sources: Christianity.com What Do I Need to Know about the Anglican Church? World History Encyclopedia the English Reformation
  9. 9. 9 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The Lutheran-Anglican Connection The Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) have been in full communion since 2001. This means that while each church maintains its own autonomy, it also fully recognizes the catholicity and apostolicity of the other. In practical terms, this means that Anglicans and Lutherans in Canada can share the Eucharist together, use each other’s liturgies, and participate in each other’s ordinations. Anglican and Lutheran clergy may also serve interchangeably in either church. The Joint Anglican-Lutheran Commission (JALC) is a group of individuals from each church who meet twice yearly to explore ways our two churches can work even more closely together in full communion. One example of this growing cooperation is the 2013 Anglican-Lutheran Joint Assembly. Source: The Anglican Church of Canada website https://www.anglican.ca/faith/eir/full-communion-partnership/ The legacy of the Reformation The Reformation is currently not widely commemorated in Anglican Churches. This may be explained by the coincidence of the Reformation with the celebration of the feasts of All Saints and All Souls. Also, greater emphasis is placed on promoting ecumenism with a view to changing the Reformation’s legacy of disunity among Christian denominations. In 2000, 13 pairs of Anglican and Roman Catholic Bishops from around the world met in Mississauga to deepen relationships. That led to the creation of the International Anglican Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission. This Commission has sought to encourage practical ways in which Anglican and Roman Catholics can ‒ in spite of our continued differences ‒ engage together in mission and ministry. Deepened friendships have led to sharing, like the covenant signed by the Bishop of Qu’Appelle and the Archbishop of Regina in 2011 that encourages prayer for one another, a joint annual service, shared work in justice ministry, and shared consultation with Indigenous elders. – Archbishop Linda Nicholls, Primate, the Anglican Church in Canada Changing the legacy of the Reformation – Anglican Journal October 2017
  10. 10. 10 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Advent – Happy New Year! Advent is the beginning of the Church Year. It is a time of anticipation, a time of preparation, and a time of remembrance. “Advent” comes from the Latin adventus, meaning “coming or arrival.” Used by the Church, the word refers to: 1. The “arrival” of Jesus Christ when he was born on the original Christmas Day 2. The upcoming “arrival” of Jesus Christ when, as Christians believe, he will return to judge the living and the dead. Each major festal celebration (Christmas and Easter) is prefixed with a season of preparation. The movement of the Church Year assumes that we will better understand and experience these feasts if we spend time in reflection and meditation upon why we need them in the first place. During Advent our scripture readings are taken from the books of the prophets and John the Baptist because they tell us of a time when the Messiah had not yet come. They take us as if back to the times of anticipation and longing. They remind us of how dramatic and powerful the Gospel story of God becoming a man really is. They prepare our minds and hearts for the joy of the Incarnation. Advent is necessarily a reflective, anticipatory season. 1. first for Christ’s second coming to judge the living and the dead (2 Pet 3:11-14; 1 John 3:2-3), and also 2. to celebrate Christ’s first arrival at Christmas. Just as the Israelites awaited a Messiah to fulfill God’s promises from Genesis 3:15 to Jeremiah 31:31-34 and beyond, so Christians await the return of Jesus the Messiah to make all things new (Revelation 21). As a new year represents a new beginning, Advent heralds the coming of Jesus. Advent calls us to journey through the life of Jesus through the Church Year and its seasons of Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, Easter, Pentecost. – Some text quoted from articles on Advent on www.anglicancompass.com O come, O come, Emmanuel, And ransom captive Israel, That mourns in lonely exile here, Until the Son of God appear. Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel Shall come to thee, O Israel.
  11. 11. 11 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The Advent wreath The Advent wreath was created out of evergreens, symbolizing everlasting life in the midst of winter and death as the evergreen is continuously green. The circle reminds us of God’s unending love and the eternal life He makes possible. The Advent wreath is a symbol of the season, with a candle lit each of the four Sundays leading up to, and on Christmas Day. The light of the flickering candle flames reminds us who Jesus is: “In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.” (John 1:4-5). • The first candle symbolizes hope and is called the "Prophet’s Candle." The prophets of the Old Testament, especially Isaiah, waited in hope for the Messiah’s arrival. The purple color symbolizes royalty, repentance, and fasting. • The second candle represents faith and is called "Bethlehem’s Candle." Micah had foretold that the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem, which is also the birthplace of King David. The second candle is also purple to symbolize preparation for the coming king. • The third candle symbolizes joy and is called the "Shepherd’s Candle." To the shepherd’s great joy, the angels announced that Jesus came for humble, unimportant people like them, too. In liturgy, the color rose signifies joy. This candle is colored pink to represent joyfulness and rejoicing. • The fourth candle represents peace and is called the "Angel’s Candle." The angels announced that Jesus came to bring peace--He came to bring people close to God and to each other again. This color is also purple to represent the culmination of love through the Messiah. • The (optional) fifth candle represents light and purity and is called "Christ’s candle." It is placed in the middle and is lit on Christmas Day. This candle is white to represent pure light and victory. – Source: Crosswalk.com, article on The Advent wreath & candles – meaning, symbolism & history
  12. 12. 12 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Christmas Although Christmas is celebrated in December, no one knows on which date Jesus was born. Some scholars believe that the actual date was in the early spring, placing it closer to Easter, when the shepherds were more likely to be tending their flocks in the fields. The origins of the holiday and its December date lie in the ancient Greco-Roman world, as commemorations probably began sometime in the 2nd century. There are at least three possible origins for the December date. The Roman Christian historian Sextus Julius Africanus dated Jesus’ conception to March 25 (the same date upon which he held that the world was created), which, after nine months in his mother’s womb, would result in a December 25 birth. In the 3rd century, the Roman Empire, which at the time had not adopted Christianity, celebrated the rebirth of the Unconquered Sun (Sol Invictus) on December 25th. This holiday not only marked the return of longer days after the winter solstice but also followed the popular Roman festival called the Saturnalia (during which people feasted and exchanged gifts). It was also the birthday of the Indo-European deity Mithra, a god of light and loyalty whose cult was at the time growing popular among Roman soldiers. The church in Rome began formally celebrating Christmas on December 25 in 336, during the reign of the emperor Constantine. As Constantine had made Christianity the effective religion of the empire, some have speculated that choosing this date had the political motive of weakening the established pagan celebrations. The date was not widely accepted in the Eastern Empire, where January 6 had been favored, for another half-century, and Christmas did not become a major Christian festival until the 9th century. – Source: Brittanica.com article on Why is Christmas in December?
  13. 13. 13 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The history of the outdoor crèche This wooden crèche was given to Nancy and Ross Hamilton by their neighbour Canon Phil Bristow when he moved out of the province in approximately 1994. Ross refurbished it and it stood on their front lawn until 2010 when Nancy & Ross donated it to Church of the Resurrection upon their move to NDG. The crèche was then refurbished by Simon Hartropp and it adorned the lawn at the Resurrection until its move to All Saints by the Lake. While at the Resurrection, sadly, one year the statue of baby Jesus was stolen. Nancy had an extra set of figures, so Karen Purcell was able to get another copy made of baby Jesus. (In 2019) the crèche underwent another re-refurbishing by David Tomsons. The Stable should now be stable for many more years to come, as it continues to reminder us of the humble place of birth of our Lord, Jesus Christ. Reprinted from The Anchor, Winter 2020
  14. 14. 14 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Primate calls on Anglicans to ring bells at Christmas “I heard the bells on Christmas Day Their old, familiar carols play, and wild and sweet The words repeat Of peace on earth, good-will to men!” —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow When we want the world to know that something important has happened, we make a noise! Whether it is a siren, clanging pots or the bells in the steeple of a church, the whole community hears about it. An ambulance or fire engine siren tells us of something catastrophic. The banging of pots may announce that a New Year has begun, or it may acknowledge the sacrifices of first line health care providers in a pandemic. For centuries, church bells have signaled worship, marked a funeral or pealed in joy at anything from a wedding to the end of a war. In 2013, I stood in St. Peter’s Square, Vatican City, at the announcement of the new Pope. Immediately, the bells of every church in Rome began to peal out the good news. During this pandemic and especially as we contemplate a Christmas isolated from many family and friends, it is still the time of celebrating the birth of Christ—a birth that changed the world. For that, we need to ring the bells! I invite every parish with a bell, and every parishioner with a bell at home, to ring out our joy at 12 noon (in your applicable time zone) on Christmas Day. Let’s share with the world that despite all the restrictions and losses we are facing, Christ is born and hope is renewed. And let’s extend the celebration online with our loved ones and communities—on Christmas Day, post your videos or photos on social media using the hashtag #HopeRingsOut as we celebrate the birth of Christ. Our digital team will compile the public posts available, as a reflection of our unity in faith. Posts will be collected through Sunday, December 27. Yours in Christ, Published on anglican.ca
  15. 15. 15 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing God speaks in many tongues A gray fall day, friends have invited me to a different sort of Anglican service. St Jax, on the corner of Bishop and Ste Catherine. The last time I was there over 3 decades ago, the ceilings were festooned in Union Jacks, the regimental church of the Victoria Rifles. No more. The priest, an innovator, Graham Singh, has taken the flags down and respectfully placed them in a plexiglass box in one corner. The pews have been torn out, making for a wide-open space. The congregation is young and old, lots of students, with a Sunday school in the back. No communion, but bagels and coffee are offered before the service, the new covenant, taken in jeans and sweaters. The vibe is relaxed and informal. We pray for the environment, for earthquake victims in Iran, for each other. A 7-piece band, complete with drums, plays a half hour of contemporary Christian songs. Then the Bible study, every line contemplated, digested, read again and again, with a laugh and a smile. Bellies full of bagels, minds full of God, the band comes back at the end. They play 'By the Rivers of Babylon' by Boney M. A parishioner is among those who spontaneously break into a dance. Boney M's lead singer was Jamaican, she tells us. Carry us away from captivity. Chatter with Graham at the end, who moves effortlessly through the congregation, keeps track of his children, talks of ambitious plans to make St Jax even more of a welcoming space with home improvements. God speaks in many tongues. This article was written by a parolee who participates in the Anglican Church’s prison ministry.
  16. 16. 16 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Returning to Church ❖ Passports The Diocese of Montreal has determined that, for the time being, public worship is an essential service and therefore vaccine passports will not be checked. As far as we know, everyone who is eligible for the vaccine and attends worship at All Saints' is fully vaccinated. We very strongly encourage everyone who comes into the church building to be vaccinated, and we request that if you attend worship and are not vaccinated (for any reason) that you let us know for contact tracing purposes if necessary. Thank you for helping to keep us all safe!! ❖ Christmas Flowers This Christmas, All Saints by the Lake will once again decorate the sanctuary with Christmas flowers. Your donations are welcome, and you are encouraged to give in memory or in honour of loved ones. Please contact the office with the names of loved ones departed. Since the Flower Fund currently has an ample balance, Christmas flower donations will be sent to our partner diocese in the Territory of the People in British Columbia to assist with their relief and rebuilding efforts from the multiple disasters that have struck them this year. What’s Happening in yOUR Parish
  17. 17. 17 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Be still and know the presence of the Lord! ❖ Meditatio is back! We meet in the chapel on Mondays at 2:00 PM. This time of prayer includes a short talk by Lawrence Freeman OSB, the Director of WCCM (The World Community for Christian Meditation) followed by 20 minutes of meditation. All COVID protocols will be followed. All are welcome! If you would like more information, please do not hesitate to contact Stacey Neale at sj.neale@sympatico.ca or 514-631-9796. Do you have questions? ❖ "Stump the Incumbent/Anglican Terminology." Rev. Grace has had several people recently ask, "Can you tell us about all these weird church words and what they mean?" So that's exactly what we'll do! After church on November 21, December 5, and December 12, we'll gather for a Zoom/in person hybrid series on "Stump the Incumbent/Anglican Terminology." What's the difference between a Lay Reader and an Executive Archdeacon? Between a chalice and a ciborium? Between a sacristy and a narthex? Wonder no more! And see if you can come up with a question that Rev. Grace can't answer! Do you want answers? Come to Bible study ❖ Morning Prayer and Bible Study sessions are now on! Join us on Wednesdays on Zoom and in-church at 10am, led by Rev. Grace. We will discuss the weekly lectionary readings at Bible Study. Everyone is welcome! Daily fellowship ❖ Evening Prayer Monday to Saturday, 5pm except Fridays at 4:45pm via Zoom and telephone. Contact Jennifer at the office for the Zoom link. ❖ Caroling Feel the Christmas Spirit as we sing carols on Sat Dec 18, 11:30am. Goodies and hot chocolate will be served!
  18. 18. 18 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing Share the joy of Christmas – opportunities to give ❖ Dorval Community Aid All Saints by the Lake will be providing 6 Christmas baskets for those in need. Donations of non-perishable food and gifts are greatly needed and appreciated. Food suggestions: pasta, pasta sauce, cereal, canned soup, canned meats, rice, stews, chili, fruit cups, juice etc. Food donations may be placed in the Dorval Community Aid basket. Monetary donations will be used to buy turkeys, eggs, clementines and other fresh food. Please mark “Christmas baskets” with your monetary donations. The deadline for your donations is Tues Dec 14th. Delivery of the baskets will take place on Dec 16th Contact Darlene Scott: darlene.scott@videotron.ca for a description of families we are supporting this year and to make a donation. ❖ St. Michael’s Mission The St Michael's Mission tree is up, and we want to cover it with new men's underwear, socks, gloves, tuques, scarves, and toiletries until Dec 19. All donations will be delivered to the Mission on Dec 20 and will fill gift bags given out to every client at their Christmas parties on the 21st and 22nd. Pasta, any size is the food of the month for December for Saint Michael's Mission. Please no individual donations over 900 grams for ease of carrying. Please make your donations by Sunday, 19 December. ❖ British Columbia Sun Dec 12 Lessons and Carols, 4pm, the offering from this service will be sent to the diocese in the territory of the People in British Columbia along with the Christmas flower donations.
  19. 19. 19 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing ❖ The anti- Covid-19 vaccine With the announcement that the vaccine would be available for our age group I planned to fumble my way through registration as soon as it opened. It turned out to be a three-prong process. 1. Where you provided your health card and ID and were than provided with the date of your next appointment. 2. You moved to the next post where your health and meds were verified. 3. Next you were directed to the injection site for your shot after which you were provided with information as to which vaccine was used and directed to keep the information with your medical card. You were then sent to an area where you were required to stay for 15 minutes before leaving. As the whole process is computerized, and being the first day, there were some minor hiccups but certainly nothing major. In fact, I have spent more time in a doctor’s office waiting to see them than the time it took to get our shots. I would certainly give this site an A. - Submitted by Roger Carter “with the best of health!” in the Spring 2021 edition of The Anchor Photo Gallery Looking back at the things we looked forward to in 2021
  20. 20. 20 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing ❖ Welcoming a new family member We are so happy to welcome Pippa to our family Philippa Joan Lekx, born a whopping 9lb12oz just after noon on 18 February at the Pointe Claire Maison de Naissance, after a delightful, speedy, and empowering labour and delivery. We are healthy and thankful and entirely in love! Welcome to the world Phillipa! It's a great time to be a girl. There are no limits to what you can become! Rebecca and Peter, what a blessing...three lovely, beautiful children. - Reprinted from the Spring 2021 edition of The Anchor ❖ Getting the elevator off the ground! In the December (2020) issue of The Anchor, we mentioned that a contract was signed with a contractor to install the elevator and that work was expected to start early in the new year and be completed for Easter. We are pleased to be able to report on significant progress, the most obvious sign being a hole in the floor. The hole in the floor was cut on March 17. Thanks to Raymond Noël for his outstanding work to make this project happen!
  21. 21. 21 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing ❖ Baptisms On March 6th, Iylah-Anne Serenity Gordon was baptised at our Church. Iylah-Anne is the daughter of Melanie Cajolais and Stephan Gordon. Iylah-Anne’s family was in a bubble during spring break. Her parents made the decision to have the baptism as soon as possible. In the words of mom Melanie Cajolais: “1 year into this pandemic I believe we need to stop postponing life. We all need to know that its ok to do things differently from the way we are used to. Baptism, wedding, baby showers and birthdays. We would have loved a church full of people and a party afterwards with music, cake, and fellowship. However, this was also great. Albeit I wish my parents had been able to attend. But Iylah- Anne has been baptized and for that I am thankful.” On November 7, Serena Capplette and her daughter Coralie Trepannier were baptized. In the words of Rev. Grace, “Baptizing adults and older children is one of my favourite things to do, and this will be a grand celebration on our parish’s patronal festival. Serena and Coralie then both plan to be confirmed when the Bishop visits, as well!” ❖ The joy of Easter Palm leaves were distributed at the church. Gladys Randle delivered a bunch to her friends and fellow parishioners in her building, and she even showed them how to make a palm cross. Here are some palm crosses made by one of her students.
  22. 22. 22 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing ❖ Seeing our church garden bloom Our spring garden sprung in time for Easter. Our gardening team led by Campbell Taylor was hard at work as soon as they could. Our neighbours in Dorval admire our garden. Then-Mayor Edgar Rouleau and the City of Dorval councillors gifted a beautiful hydrangea to our Church!
  23. 23. 23 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing ❖ Seeing each other – even if it meant doing church differently Church in the Park met regularly in summer on Sunday afternoons in Cedar Park Heights Park! Families with young children brought musical instruments, food, toys and friends. Messy Church – was held, in-person, outside in October! A welcome change of scene and everyone had fun! Coffee on the lawn outdoor gatherings on the front lawn of the church provided informal fellowship for those of us who wanted to partake of a cup of coffee (or lemonade) and a snack, from 9-11 on Tuesday mornings with Thursdays as a rain date!
  24. 24. 24 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing ❖ In-person worship…finally! In-person worship resumed on September 12, while giving parishioners the option of participating virtually on Zoom. Since September 12, we celebrated the induction of Peter Lekx as our seminarian, the resumption of choir rehearsals, Thanksgiving, the Feast of All Saints, Bible study and our virtual bazaar choir rehearsals, Thanksgiving, the feast of All Saints and our virtual bazaar.
  25. 25. 25 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing A beloved Advent tradition from the Church of the Resurrection. ❖ Advent banners, (in no particular order) from the Church of the Resurrection. Years ago, parishioners and families with young children got together to create Advent banners with symbols relating to the themes of Advent; Hope, Peace, Joy and Love. They discussed what the themes meant. They chose fabrics and created images for the banners that symbolized the themes in a very personal way. Take a closer look the next time you are in church. On the banner of Hope, you will see the star of Bethlehem, an open tomb and tulip bulbs - which is a whole story by itself! The Peace banner has a poppy on it, a picture of the world with people from all over, a tree - someone thought it was peaceful to sit under a tree, a sunrise. Joy has fireworks and people dancing and music and a bear. Love has a sand dollar reflecting the legend, a cat, balloons and the sun - Jesus is the light of the world. Karen Purcell made the banners and appliqued the fabric images. All the banners will be on display at the back of the church by Christmas. – Submitted by Grace Lavigne and Laura Hill
  26. 26. 26 Reconciling | Affirming | Rejoicing The last word Dear brothers and sisters in Christ! As the end of calendar year 2021 approaches, we have already begun a new Church Year on Advent Sunday 28 November 2021. The Church Year is designed to help us follow Jesus’ life journey throughout the year, starting first with Christmas. A new year presents a new beginning. In this edition of The Anchor, we have looked at the various celebrations in fall. Interestingly, they combine Thanksgiving with reflections on reformed ways of thinking. Our Photo Gallery highlights the things that we waited for, and that came to fruition in 2021. As we go through our Advent reflections and as we approach 2022, it’s a good time to identify the things that have served us well in the past and decide if they will continue to support us as we move forward into the new year. It’s a good time to release the things that no longer serve us or are no longer meaningful. It’s also the right time to set new goals to better serve our Lord and our community. Take inspiration from the lives and legacies of the Saints and the faithful departed. Participate in Bible studies to gain fresh, new perspectives on familiar scripture readings. Look back at the past year to see if there are learnings that can lead us into new and better directions. By doing this, we create spaces for new experiences and open doors for the blessings that God willingly wants to bestow. Happy new year! Yours in His service, Camille cisaacsmorell@videotron.ca The Anglican Parish of All Saints by the Lake 865 Lakeshore Drive Dorval, QC H9S 2C7 (514) 631-3601 allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com www.pramchurch.org Facebook: Anglican Church of All Saints by the Lake Incumbent The Reverend Grace Burson gburson@montreal.anglican.ca 438-334-0610 Pastoral Intern Peter Lekx Pglekx@gmail.com Organist and Choir Director Chris Grocholski chris_grocholski@yahoo.ca Lay Readers Bob McLachlan, Yvonne Wakeland, Mark Weatherley Yvonne Bayne Rector’s Warden Raymond Noël newcons@sympatico.ca 514-697-7636 People’s Warden Yvonne Bayne ybayne84@gmail.com 438-969-2046 Parish Administrator Jennifer Gibb allsaintsbythelake@gmail.com 514-631-3601 Office Hours: 9:30am - 3:30pm Tuesdays - Fridays

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