Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Ctws ocean energy thresher

869 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
  • Login to see the comments

  • Be the first to like this

Ctws ocean energy thresher

  1. 1. Ocean Renewable Energy:Offshore Wind, Wave & Tidal Power The Washington State Ocean Energy Conference: Deep Water Wind and Ocean Energy Economy Bremerton, Washington November 8 & 9, 2011 Presented by Robert Thresher, NREL Research Fellow National Wind Technology CenterNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC
  2. 2. Energy sources in the United States in 2009National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  3. 3. Most U.S. Offshore Wind Resource is in Deep Water GW by Depth (m) Region 0 - 30 30 - 60 > 60 New England 100.2 136.2 250.4 Mid Atlantic 298.1 179.1 92.5 S. Atlantic Bight 134.1 48.8 7.7 California 4.4 10.5 573.0 Pacific Northw est 15.1 21.3 305.3 Great Lakes 176.7 106.4 459.4 Gulf of Mexico 340.3 120.1 133.3 Haw aii 2.3 5.5 629.6 Total 1,071.2 628.0 2,451.1 Assumptions: 5 MW/km2 7 m/s and greater 0-50nm for shoreNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  4. 4. Wind Technology Evolution • Land Based Technology > 2 MW; Turbine 50% Total Installation Cost • Offshore Technology > 5 MW; Turbine 25% Total Installation Cost • Land Based Turbine Size Constrained by Highway Transport • Turbine Stiffness & Dynamic Coupling Driving Design InnovationNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  5. 5. Future Research on Offshore Wind Technology Land-based Shallow Water Transitional Depth Deepwater Floating Technology Technology Technology TechnologyOffshore WindTechnology CurrentDevelopment TechnologyNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  6. 6. Shallow Water Bottom Mounted: GE project at Arklow Banks in the Irish Sea Photo: R. ThresherNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  7. 7. Principle Power 2-MW Demonstration Characteristics Country/Sponsor: Portugal Major Partners: Vestas, EDP Turbine Size/Description: Vestas V-80, 2 MW wind turbine Deployment date : September 2011 Platform Type: Three – tank semisubmersible – 6 line mooring Site: Aguçadoura, Portugal Water Depth 40 to 50-m Approximate Budget: $ 25M USDOpportunities: The PPI WindFloat semi-submersible wind system is scheduled for installationand commissioning off the Portuguese coast in Sept 2011. The installation includes a grid-connected Vestas V80 2-MW wind turbine. Testing for at least 12 months is planned and willfocus on performance validation. An EU Framework 7 award increased their testing capability.National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  8. 8. NREL Dynamic Simulation Tool: HydroDyn Dynamic Analysis of Wind and Wave Interactions is an Important Technical Challenge for Floating Turbine DesignsNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  9. 9. Visualization of Avian Interaction Zones Windfarm Flight Zone Over-flight Fatality Risk Strike Zone Fly-thru Rotor ZoneNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  10. 10. Avian Strike Probability Versus Turbine Size Altamont Scale Next Generation Scale 93 Meter Diameter and 2.5MW 15 Meter Diameter and 100 kWNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  11. 11. Three Basic Forms of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy CURRENTS • Activating force flows in same direction for at least a few hours • Tidal, river, and ocean variants • Conversion technology is some sort of submerged turbine WAVES • Activating force reverses direction every 5 to 20 seconds • Conversion technology can be floating or submerged, with a wide variety of devices still being invented and developed OCEAN THERMAL • A heat engine operating on the temperature difference between hot surface water and cool water at 1000 meters. • Several possible thermodynamic cycles • Conversion technology is on a floating platform with a long pipe to deep waterNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  12. 12. The Many Wave Energy TechnologiesNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  13. 13. The Several Tidal, River and Ocean Current TechnologiesNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  14. 14. Minnesota – Economic Impacts from 1000 MW of new wind development Wind energy’s economic “ripple effect” Direct Impacts Indirect & Totals Induced Impacts (construction + 20yrs) Payments to Landowners: • $2.7 million/year Construction Phase: Total economic benefit = Local Property Tax Revenue: • 1530 new jobs $1.1 billion • $2.8 million/year • $150.6 M to local New local jobs during Construction Phase: economies construction = 2985 • 1455 new jobs Operational Phase: • $188.5 M to local economies New local long-term jobs Operational Phase: • 177 local jobs • 232 new long-term jobs • $18.2 M/yr to local = 409 • $21.2 M/yr to local economies economiesConstruction Phase = 1-2 yearsOperational Phase = 20+ years National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future
  15. 15. Questions? Photo courtesy of Oceanenergy Robert Thresher, NREL Research Fellow Robert.Thresher@nrel.govNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

×