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Module 10
10.3.1  Classes of network IP addresses  EG: An IP address 172.32.65.13 and a  default  subnet mask, the host belongs to t...
10.3.2  Introduction to and reason for subnetting  The benefits of Subnetting 1. smaller broadcast domains  2. low-level s...
10.3.2  Introduction to and reason for subnetting  Host bits are reassigned as network bits.  <ul><li>Host bits of the net...
10.3.2  Introduction to and reason for subnetting
10.3.3  Establishing the subnet mask address
10.3.3  Establishing the subnet mask address
10.3.3  Establishing the subnet mask address
10.3.3  Establishing the subnet mask address
10.3.4  Applying the subnet mask
10.3.4  Applying the subnet mask
10.3.5  Subnetting Class A and B networks  16 bits are available for Class B host IP addresses using the  default subnet m...
10.3.5  Subnetting Class A and B networks
10.3.5  Subnetting Class A and B networks
10.3.5  Subnetting Class A and B networks
10.3.5  Subnetting Class A and B networks
10.3.6  Calculating the resident subnetwork through ANDing
10.3.6  Calculating the resident subnetwork through ANDing
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Ch10 Subnetting Class

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Ch10 Subnetting Class

  1. 1. Module 10
  2. 2. 10.3.1 Classes of network IP addresses EG: An IP address 172.32.65.13 and a default subnet mask, the host belongs to the 172.32.0.0 network.
  3. 3. 10.3.2 Introduction to and reason for subnetting The benefits of Subnetting 1. smaller broadcast domains 2. low-level security provided 3. increased address flexibility EG: In a class C network a subnet mask of 255.255.255.224 will create 6 useable subnets each with 32 useable hosts.
  4. 4. 10.3.2 Introduction to and reason for subnetting Host bits are reassigned as network bits. <ul><li>Host bits of the network address are all equal to 0. </li></ul><ul><li>Host bits of the broadcast address are all equal to 1. </li></ul>
  5. 5. 10.3.2 Introduction to and reason for subnetting
  6. 6. 10.3.3 Establishing the subnet mask address
  7. 7. 10.3.3 Establishing the subnet mask address
  8. 8. 10.3.3 Establishing the subnet mask address
  9. 9. 10.3.3 Establishing the subnet mask address
  10. 10. 10.3.4 Applying the subnet mask
  11. 11. 10.3.4 Applying the subnet mask
  12. 12. 10.3.5 Subnetting Class A and B networks 16 bits are available for Class B host IP addresses using the default subnet mask . Applying the subnet mask 255.255.255.0 to a Class B network will give 254 useable hosts and 254 useable subnets.
  13. 13. 10.3.5 Subnetting Class A and B networks
  14. 14. 10.3.5 Subnetting Class A and B networks
  15. 15. 10.3.5 Subnetting Class A and B networks
  16. 16. 10.3.5 Subnetting Class A and B networks
  17. 17. 10.3.6 Calculating the resident subnetwork through ANDing
  18. 18. 10.3.6 Calculating the resident subnetwork through ANDing

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