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Gordon Parks

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Gordon Parks

  1. 1. AGAINST ALL SORTS OF SOCIAL WRONGS: THE FSA Photos of Gordon ParksAdrienne Phelps Coco BHCC June 18th, 2012
  2. 2. Our Goals for Today:THE SKINNY Identify key concepts about the relationship between the Roosevelt administration and the African American community.FOR THE TOOLKIT Learn to “read” photographs as historical evidence.CONNECT THE DOTS Craft your own argument about the Great Depression by analyzing the photographs of Gordon Parks.
  3. 3. “Self-Portrait,”Gordon Parks(1945)
  4. 4. "I saw that the camera could be aweapon against poverty, againstracism, against all sorts of socialwrongs. I knew at that point I hadto have a camera.” Gordon Parks (1999)
  5. 5. Ralph Lauren: BlueLabel Ad (2009) (1885) (1865 )
  6. 6. Journal Assignment:Find a documentary photograph in anewspaper of your choice.What’s happening in the photograph? What details do you see that make you think this?What insights into American culture in 2012 does the photograph give you?How would the photo be a good source for future historians?
  7. 7. Image List:• Slide One: • Gordon Parks, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs• Slide Three: • Gordon Parks, “Self Portrait,” Startribune.com, 1945. • Shaft Poster, IMDB.com, 1971.• Slide Five: • Ralph Lauren Ad, 2009. • L. Wallack, “Double Portrait: Barber and Client,” from the American Museum of Photography, 1885. • “The Giant Baby,” from the American Museum of Photograph, c. 1865.• Slide Six: • Gordon Parks, “Mrs. Ella Watson, a government charwoman, with three grandchildren and her adopted daughter.” Library of Congress Prints and Photographs, 1942.• Slide Seven: • Gordon Parks, “American Gothic, Washington D.C.” Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1942. • Grant Wood, “American Gothic,” 1930.

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