Green Building Codes – What Do They Meanfor Construction in San Francisco?Presented by:Raymond Buddie, Esq.Allen Matkins L...
Topics • The Green Building Codes • What Types of Projects Will Be Affected? • What Will Compliance Cost? • When Will the ...
The California Green Building Code Overview July 2008: California adopted first set of statewide "green" building codes in...
Purpose of the State Code To improve the health, safety and general welfare by enhancing the design and construction of bu...
What agencies have authority? The new code contains building standards applicable to occupancies which fall under the auth...
Which provisions apply? • Establish the type of occupancy • Verify which state agency has authority for the established   ...
Scope of regulations • Buildings shall be designed to include the green building   measures specified as mandatory in the ...
APPLICATION MATRIX FOR HOUSING CONSTRUCTION                                                          (Dept. of Housing & C...
Building Maintenance and Operation                  (710)                  710.2 An operation and maintenance manual shall...
Housing construction example • Indoor water use shall be reduced by 20% • A minimum of 50% of the construction waste gener...
San Francisco Green Building Code • New legislation adds Chapter 13C to the San Francisco Building   Code • Chapter 13C wi...
LEED: Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design • Voluntary building certification program created by the United State...
GreenPoint Rated System • The GreenPoint Rated standard is a residential green   building rating system, checklist and cer...
SF Green Building Code Chapter 13C • Establishes increased minimum energy efficiency   standards within the City and Count...
What projects are within the scope of the SF Code? • Newly constructed “Group R” (i.e. residential) occupancy   buildings ...
What projects are exempted from the SF Code? • SF projects, which are subject to Chapter 7 of the San   Francisco Environm...
Other exemptions from the SF Code • Hardship or Infeasibility       – Director of Building Inspection may grant an exempti...
Requirements applicable to all buildings within the scope of Chapter 13C • Solar Electric Systems       – The installation...
Requirements for New Group R Buildings • New Small and Mid-size Residential Buildings       – Upon operative date of the o...
Requirements for New Group B and M Occupancy Buildings • New Mid-size Commercial Buildings       – Upon operative date of ...
Requirements for New Large Commercial Interiors and Major Alterations to Existing Buildings • “New Large commercial interi...
Phase-in and goals • Requirements are phased in over a five-year period   beginning 90 days after the ordinance is adopted...
New California Academy of Sciences Buildingwww.allenmatkins.com
New California Academy of Sciences Building • Scheduled to open September 27, 2008 • LEED “Platinum” Certification • The 2...
New San                       Francisco                       Public Utilities                       Commission           ...
New San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Headquarters • 12-story building that will incorporate advanced design   con...
State Code: What types of projects will be affected? • State-owned buildings and buildings where no state   agency has aut...
State Code: What types of projects will be affected? • Public schools           • Public elementary and secondary schools,...
SF Code: What types of projects will be affected? • Most new construction in San Francisco       – Newly constructed resid...
SF Code: What types of projects will be affected?       – Large commercial interior renovations           • First-time ten...
SF Code: What types of projects will not be affected? • Projects subject to Chapter 7 of the San Francisco   Environment C...
What will compliance cost? Higher Upfront Construction Costs • Green building requirements might mean higher upfront   con...
What will compliance cost? • Possibly have a negative impact on employment • Per capita income could be reduced • Report b...
What will compliance cost? Lower Costs in the Long Run • Over the long run, green building requirements reduce the   costs...
When will the State building code take effect?       – Adopted July 17, 2008 by California Building Standards         Comm...
When will the SF building code take effect?       – Takes effect 90 days after it is adopted by Board of Supervisors and  ...
Green Building Requirements In San Francisco Building Code                                                   Chapter 13C  ...
How will incentives be implemented? • California Solar Initiative           • State-level program to create 3,000 megawatt...
How will incentives be implemented? • Solar Energy Incentive Program (GoSolarSF)           • The City and County of San Fr...
SF Code: Possibility of superior performance incentives • Buildings that significantly exceed the baseline   requirements ...
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Green Building Codes –What Do They Mean for Construction in San Francisco?

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Green Building Codes –What Do They Mean for Construction in San Francisco?

  1. 1. Green Building Codes – What Do They Meanfor Construction in San Francisco?Presented by:Raymond Buddie, Esq.Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP
  2. 2. Topics • The Green Building Codes • What Types of Projects Will Be Affected? • What Will Compliance Cost? • When Will the New Building Codes Take Effect? • How Will Incentives Be Implemented?www.allenmatkins.com
  3. 3. The California Green Building Code Overview July 2008: California adopted first set of statewide "green" building codes in nation – known as "California Green Building Standards Code” Initially voluntary Define minimum standards but localities can adopt more stringent standards Defines “green building” as a holistic approach to design, construction and demolition that minimizes the building’s impact on the environment, the occupants and the communitywww.allenmatkins.com
  4. 4. Purpose of the State Code To improve the health, safety and general welfare by enhancing the design and construction of buildings through the use of building concepts having a positive environmental impact and encouraging sustainable construction practices in the following categories: – Planning and design – Energy efficiency – Water efficiency and conservation – Material conservation and resource efficiency – Environmental air qualitywww.allenmatkins.com
  5. 5. What agencies have authority? The new code contains building standards applicable to occupancies which fall under the authority of different state agencies – California Building Standards Commission – Department of Housing and Community Development – Division of the State Architect – Office of Statewide Health Planning and Developmentwww.allenmatkins.com
  6. 6. Which provisions apply? • Establish the type of occupancy • Verify which state agency has authority for the established occupancy • Find the application matrix for the applicable agency in Chapter 11 • The application matrix lists the green building measures adopted, provides the effective date and gives additional information regarding green building measures applicable to the established occupancywww.allenmatkins.com
  7. 7. Scope of regulations • Buildings shall be designed to include the green building measures specified as mandatory in the application matrices in Chapter 11 of the code. • Voluntary green building measures may be included but are not required.www.allenmatkins.com
  8. 8. APPLICATION MATRIX FOR HOUSING CONSTRUCTION (Dept. of Housing & Community Development) GREEN BUILDING MEASURE REQUIRED VOLUNTARY PLANNING AND DESIGN Site Development (406) 406.2 A plan is developed and implemented to manage storm water 1 2010 CBC drainage during construction. ENERGY EFFICIENCY Performance Approach. (503) 503.2 Minimum requirements. Low-rise residential buildings shall meet 1 or exceed the minimum standard design required by the California Energy 2010 CBC Standards currently in effect. Prescriptive Approach. (504) 504.6 Minimum requirements. 1 Low-rise residential buildings shall meet or exceed the minimum standard 2010 CBC design required by the California Energy Standards currently in effect. AIR SEALING PACKAGE (504) 506.1 Joints and openings. Joint and other openings at the following locations: 1. Exterior joints around window and door frames, including doors between the house and garage, between interior HVAC closets and unconditioned space, between attic and underfloor access and conditioned space and between wall sole plates, floors, exterior panels 1 and all siding materials. 2010 CBC 2. Openings for plumbing, electrical and gas lines in exterior walls and interior wall, ceilings and floors. 3. Openings into the attic. 4. Exhaust ducts from clothes dryers and other exhaust fans shall have a damper. 5. Cuts or notches in exterior wall plates. 506.1.1 Other openings. Whole house fan louvers shall close tightly and be insulated or covered to a minimum of R-4.2. WATER EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION Indoor Water Use (603) 603.2 Indoor water use shall be reduced by 20% using one of the follow methods. 7/01/2011 1. Water saving fixtures or flow restrictors shall be used. 2. A 20% reduction in baseline water use shall be demonstrated. 603.2.1 Multiple showerheads shall not exceed maximum flow rates. 7/01/2011 MATERIAL CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE EFFICIENCY Construction Waste Reduction, Disposal and Recycling (708) 708.3 A minimum of 50% of the construction waste generated at the site is diverted to recycle or salvage. 1 Exception: Alternate waste reduction methods are developed by 2010 CBCwww.allenmatkins.com working with local agencies if diversion or recycle facilities capable of compliance with this item do not exist.
  9. 9. Building Maintenance and Operation (710) 710.2 An operation and maintenance manual shall be provided to the 1 2010 CBC building occupant or owner. INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Pollutant Control (804) 804.3 Duct openings and other related air distribution component openings 1 2010 CBC shall be covered. 1 804.4.1 Adhesives shall be No- or Low-VOC. 2010 CBC 1 804.4.2 Paints, stains and other coatings shall be No- or Low-VOC. 2010 CBC 1 804.4.3 Carpet and carpet systems shall be Low-VOC. 2010 CBC 804.4.4 Particleboard, medium density fiberboard (MDF), and plywood 1 used in interior finish systems shall comply with low formaldehyde emission 2010 CBC standards. Interior Moisture Control (805) 805.2 Vapor retarder and capillary break is installed at slab on grade 1 2010 CBC foundations. 805.3 Moisture content of wood used in wall and floor framing is checked 1 2010 CBC before enclosure. Air Quality and Exhaust (806) 806.3 Exhaust fans which terminate outside the building are provided in 1 2010 CBC every bathroom. 806.4 MERV 6, or higher filters are installed on central air and heating 1 2010 CBC systems. 1 Unless specified otherwise, this measure shall become effective on the effective date of the 2010 California Building Codewww.allenmatkins.com
  10. 10. Housing construction example • Indoor water use shall be reduced by 20% • A minimum of 50% of the construction waste generated at the site must be diverted to recycle or salvage • Exhaust ventilation fans for every bathroom and high- efficiency filters on all air-duct systems are required • Vapor barriers required under foundation slabswww.allenmatkins.com
  11. 11. San Francisco Green Building Code • New legislation adds Chapter 13C to the San Francisco Building Code • Chapter 13C will implement the recommendations of Mayor Gavin Newsom’s Task Force on Green Building – In 2007, the Task Force on Green Building was established to advise and recommend how to improve the quality and increase the number of green buildings in San Francisco • Chapter 13C will impose green building requirements on newly constructed buildings, including privately-owned buildings • Buildings must achieve certain ratings in accordance with LEED or GreenPointswww.allenmatkins.com
  12. 12. LEED: Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design • Voluntary building certification program created by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) to provide standards for what constitutes a “green” building • Nationally accepted benchmark • Rates buildings in five key areas: – Sustainable Site Development – Water Efficiency – Energy Efficiency – Materials Selection – Indoor Environmental Quality • Within each area, points are earned for satisfying specific performance- oriented criteria • Four categories: Certified, Silver, Gold or Platinum • Projects must be registered with the USGBC to earn LEED certificationwww.allenmatkins.com
  13. 13. GreenPoint Rated System • The GreenPoint Rated standard is a residential green building rating system, checklist and certification methodology of the non-profit organization “Build It Green” • An alternative to LEED for newly constructed single-family homes and multifamily homes in California • Similar to LEED, GreenPoint Rated homes achieve points and are graded on five key areas: – Energy Efficiency – Resource Conservation – Indoor Air Quality – Water Conservation – Communitywww.allenmatkins.com
  14. 14. SF Green Building Code Chapter 13C • Establishes increased minimum energy efficiency standards within the City and County of San Francisco for certain new construction, additions and alterations • Intended to supplement the 2005 California Building Energy Efficiency Standards, as specified in California Code of Regulations, Title 24, Parts 1 and 6 • Intent: To promote the health, safety and welfare of San Francisco residents, workers and visitors by minimizing the use and waste of energy, water and other resources in the construction and operation of buildings • Provisions are mandatorywww.allenmatkins.com
  15. 15. What projects are within the scope of the SF Code? • Newly constructed “Group R” (i.e. residential) occupancy buildings • Newly constructed commercial buildings of “Group B or M” occupancies that are 5,000 gross square feet or more • New first-time build-outs of commercial interiors that are 25,000 gross square feet or more in Group B or M occupancy buildings • Major alterations that are 25,000 gross square feet or more in existing buildings of Group B, M, or R occupancieswww.allenmatkins.com
  16. 16. What projects are exempted from the SF Code? • SF projects, which are subject to Chapter 7 of the San Francisco Environment Code – Chapter 7, enacted in 2004, requires all new construction and major renovations on municipal buildings over 5,000 square feet to achieve a LEED Silver certification • Any new building in which laboratory use of any occupancy classification is the primary use • Any building undergoing renovation in which the area of renovation will be primarily for laboratory use of any occupancy classificationwww.allenmatkins.com
  17. 17. Other exemptions from the SF Code • Hardship or Infeasibility – Director of Building Inspection may grant an exemption if a permit applicant for a project believes that circumstances exist that make it a hardship or infeasible to fully meet the requirements of Chapter 13C – Director shall determine maximum feasible number of credits or other compliance reasonably achievable for the project – If exemption is granted, applicant must achieve number of credits or compliance that Director determines to be achievable • Historic Structures – Director may grant an exemption for a historic structure if it is determined that compliance would impair the structure’s historic integritywww.allenmatkins.com
  18. 18. Requirements applicable to all buildings within the scope of Chapter 13C • Solar Electric Systems – The installation must meet all installation criteria in the California Energy Commission’s Guidebook • Stormwater – Stormwater management shall meet the “Best Management Practices” and “Stormwater Design Guidelines” of the SFPUC, and shall meet or exceed certain applicable LEED guidelines • Solid Waste – Areas provided for recycling, composting and trash storage, collection and loading, including chute systems, must be designed for equal convenience for all users to separate those three material systems, and must provide space to accommodate a sufficient quantity and type of containers to be compatible with current methods of collection • Building Demolition – If construction of a new building is proposed within five years of the demolition of an existing building on the site, additional requirements applywww.allenmatkins.com
  19. 19. Requirements for New Group R Buildings • New Small and Mid-size Residential Buildings – Upon operative date of the ordinance, permit applicants must submit a GreenPoints Checklist, but no points are required to be achieved at that time – Effective January 1, 2009, new small and midsize residential buildings must achieve a minimum of 25 “GreenPoints” – Amount of GreenPoints required increases over time. By January 1, 2012, applicants for small and mid-size residential buildings must achieve a minimum of 75 GreenPoints • New High-Rise Residential Buildings – Upon operative date of the ordinance, permit applicants must submit documentation to achieve LEED “Certified” certification or alternatively, must achieve minimum of 50 GreenPoints – Effective January 1, 2010, applicants must be LEED “Silver” Certified or alternatively, must achieve minimum of 75 GreenPointswww.allenmatkins.com
  20. 20. Requirements for New Group B and M Occupancy Buildings • New Mid-size Commercial Buildings – Upon operative date of the ordinance, permit applicants must submit LEED Checklist, but no points are required to be achieved at that time – Effective January 1, 2012, applicants must submit documentation to verify renewable on-site energy or purchase energy credits • New High-Rise Commercial Buildings – Upon operative date of the ordinance, permit applicants must submit documentation to achieve LEED “Certified” Certification – Effective January 1, 2009, must achieve LEED “Silver” rating – Effective January 1, 2012, must achieve LEED “Gold” rating – Effective January 1, 2012, permit applicants must submit documentation to verify achievement of renewable on-site energy or purchase of green energy creditswww.allenmatkins.com
  21. 21. Requirements for New Large Commercial Interiors and Major Alterations to Existing Buildings • “New Large commercial interiors” means first-time tenant improvements where areas of construction are over 25,000 square feet in Group B or M buildings • “Major alterations” means alterations where interior finishes are removed and significant upgrades to structural and mechanical, electrical and/or plumbing systems are proposed where the areas of such construction are 25,000 square feet or more • Upon operative date of ordinance, permit applications for such construction must submit documentation to achieve LEED “Certified” Certification • Effective January 1, 2009, must achieve a LEED “Silver” rating • Effective January 1, 2012, must achieve a LEED “Gold” rating • Upon operative date of the ordinance, permit applicants for alterations must submit documentation to verify use of low-emitting materials under LEEDwww.allenmatkins.com
  22. 22. Phase-in and goals • Requirements are phased in over a five-year period beginning 90 days after the ordinance is adopted by the Board of Supervisors and signed by the Mayor • By 2012, the ordinance expects to, among other things: – reduce CO2 emissions by 60,000 tons – save 100 million gallons of drinking water – reduce wastewater and storm water by 90 million gallons of water – reduce construction and demolition waste by 700 million pounds – increase valuations of recycled materials by $200 million – reduce automobile trips by 540,000www.allenmatkins.com
  23. 23. New California Academy of Sciences Buildingwww.allenmatkins.com
  24. 24. New California Academy of Sciences Building • Scheduled to open September 27, 2008 • LEED “Platinum” Certification • The 2.5 acres of living roof will absorb nearly 2 million gallons of rainwater per year • Solar panels surround the living roof and will provide up to 10% of the Academy’s electric need • Expansive, floor-to-ceiling walls of glass allowing 90% of building’s interior offices to use natural lighting • Radiant heating system in museum’s floors will reduce building’s energy need by 10% annuallywww.allenmatkins.com
  25. 25. New San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Headquarterswww.allenmatkins.com
  26. 26. New San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Headquarters • 12-story building that will incorporate advanced design concepts including natural ventilation and daylighting • Goal: LEED “Platinum” Certification • Sustainable strategies include thermal shafts and chilled ceilings • Recycled materials originating from the demolition of the existing building will be used for construction • Construction has not started yetwww.allenmatkins.com
  27. 27. State Code: What types of projects will be affected? • State-owned buildings and buildings where no state agency has authority to adopt building standards • State-owned buildings, including buildings constructed by the Trustees of the California State University, and buildings designed and constructed by the Regents of the University of California and all occupancies where no state agency has the authority to adopt building standards applicable to such buildings • Housing construction • Low-rise residential buildings constructed throughout the State of California, including, but not limited to: hotels, motels, lodging houses, apartment houses, dwellings, dormitories, condominiums, shelters for homeless persons, congregate residences, employee housing, factory-built housing and other types of dwellings containing sleeping accommodations with or without common toilet or cooking facilitieswww.allenmatkins.com
  28. 28. State Code: What types of projects will be affected? • Public schools • Public elementary and secondary schools, community college buildings and state-owned or state-leased essential buildings regulated by the Division of the State Architect • Historical buildings • Qualified historical buildings and structures and their associated sites regulated by the State Historical Building Safety Board within the Division of the State Architect • Hospitals and care facilities • General acute care hospitals, acute psychiatric hospitals, skilled nursing and/or intermediate care facilities, clinics licensed by the Department of Public Health and correctional treatment centers regulated by the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development • Other • Graywater systems regulated by the Department of Water Resourceswww.allenmatkins.com
  29. 29. SF Code: What types of projects will be affected? • Most new construction in San Francisco – Newly constructed residential buildings • New small residential buildings • New mid-size residential buildings • New high-rise residential buildings – Newly constructed commercial buildings that are 5,000 gross square feet or more • New mid-size commercial buildings • New high-rise commercial buildingswww.allenmatkins.com
  30. 30. SF Code: What types of projects will be affected? – Large commercial interior renovations • First-time tenant improvements where areas of construction are over 25,000 gross square feet – Major alterations to existing commercial buildings • Alterations where interior finishes are removed and significant upgrades to structural and mechanical, electrical and/or plumbing systems are proposed where areas of such construction are 25,000 gross square feet or morewww.allenmatkins.com
  31. 31. SF Code: What types of projects will not be affected? • Projects subject to Chapter 7 of the San Francisco Environment Code – Chapter 7 requires all new construction and major renovations on municipal buildings over 5,000 square feet to achieve a LEED Silver certification from the USGBC • Laboratory primary use projects – Any new building in which laboratory use of any occupancy classification is the primary use – Any building undergoing renovation in which the area of renovation will be primarily for laboratory use of any occupancy classificationwww.allenmatkins.com
  32. 32. What will compliance cost? Higher Upfront Construction Costs • Green building requirements might mean higher upfront construction and renovation costs in the short term – Estimates vary – Report by San Francisco’s Office of Economic Analysis estimates that green building requirements will increase construction costs initially in the range of 0 to 1.2%, and rising to 0.2 to 2% by 2012 – Costs are partly passed on to tenants in the form of higher rents and housing priceswww.allenmatkins.com
  33. 33. What will compliance cost? • Possibly have a negative impact on employment • Per capita income could be reduced • Report by San Francisco’s Office of Economic Analysis estimates that the negative economic impact on San Francisco could range from $30 million to $700 million a year through 2027. • Cost estimates are uncertain because there are many ways to achieve any given LEED standard or earn GreenPoints, and costs are declining every yearwww.allenmatkins.com
  34. 34. What will compliance cost? Lower Costs in the Long Run • Over the long run, green building requirements reduce the costs for water and energy • Will reduce greenhouse gas emissions • Lower operating costs over the life of the buildingwww.allenmatkins.com
  35. 35. When will the State building code take effect? – Adopted July 17, 2008 by California Building Standards Commission – Takes effect 180 days after date of adoption – For now, most of the design and construction practices for non-residential buildings are voluntary – The residential construction requirements will become mandatory as of the effective date of the 2010 California Building Codewww.allenmatkins.com
  36. 36. When will the SF building code take effect? – Takes effect 90 days after it is adopted by Board of Supervisors and signed by the Mayor if the California Energy Commission has approved it by that time • Mayor Gavin Newsom signed on August 4, 2008 – If the Energy Commission has not approved by that time, ordinance will not become operative until Energy Commission has approved it – In April 2008, the Energy Commission adopted California Building Energy Efficiency Standards that are expected to take effect on July 1, 2009 • These standards will require Board of Supervisors to make a determination that the local standards are cost effective and will save more energy than the 2008 Standards • Board of Supervisors must file an application for re-approval of the San Francisco Ordinance with the California Energy Commission, and receive approval from the Energy Commission before the ordinance can take effectwww.allenmatkins.com
  37. 37. Green Building Requirements In San Francisco Building Code Chapter 13C General Type of Definition Requirement Other Specific Requirement and Timeline Construction and Timeline New Residential Construction GreenPoints: 25 in 2009, 50 in New Small 1-4 Units 2010, 75 in None 2012. GreenPoints: Under 75 feet 25 in 2009, 50 in New Midsize height, 5 or more 2010, 75 in None units 2011+. Upon effective date (2008): LEED WE 1.1-Water efficient landscaping (50% LEED: reduction) New High-Rise Over 75 feet height Certified in 2008, LEED WE 3.2-Water use reduction (20% in Silver in 2010. 2008; 30% in 2011) LEED MR 2.2-Construction Debris Management (75% diversion) New Commercial Construction Upon effective date (2009): LEED WE 1.1-Water efficient landscaping (50% reduction) LEED WE 3.1-Water use reduction (20% in Over 5,000 2009; 30% in 2011) square feet and LEED: Submit LEED MR 2.2-Construction Debris New Midsize 25,000 square checklist only Management (75% diversion) feet and under By 2010: 75 feet height LEED EA 3.0- Enhanced Commissioning By 2012: LEED EA2 or EA6- On site generation OR purchase renewable energy credits Upon effective date (2008): LEED WE 1.1-Water efficient landscaping (50% reduction) LEED WE 3.1-Water use reduction (20% in Over 75 feet LEED: 2008; 30% in 2011) height, or over Certified in 2008, LEED MR 2.2-Construction Debris Management New Large (75% diversion) 25,000 sq ft Silver in 2009, floor area Gold in 2012. By 2010: LEED EA 3.0- Enhanced Commissioning By 2012: LEED EA2 or EA6- On site generation OR purchase renewable energy credits Renovations, Alterations and Tenant Improvements Certified in 2008, Upon effective date (2008): Large Commercial LEED Environmental Quality (EQ) Over 25,000 sq. ft. Silver in 2009, Interiors 4.1/4.2/4.3-Low emitting materials Gold in 2012. Over 25,000 sq. ft. Certified in 2008, Major Alterations & major structural Silver in 2009,www.allenmatkins.com changes Gold in 2012.
  38. 38. How will incentives be implemented? • California Solar Initiative • State-level program to create 3,000 megawatts of new, solar- produced electricity by 2017 • Performance-based incentives that reward properly-installed and maintained solar systems • Provides incentives for existing residential homes and existing and new commercial, industrial and agricultural properties • All electric customers of PG&E, Southern California Edison, and San Diego Gas & Electric are eligible to apply for incentives • Incentives start at $2.50 per watt • Higher incentives for solar installations for existing and new low- income and affordable housingwww.allenmatkins.com
  39. 39. How will incentives be implemented? • Solar Energy Incentive Program (GoSolarSF) • The City and County of San Francisco, through the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, will provide rebates to residents and businesses who install solar systems on their properties • Basic residential installations of systems are eligible for rebates of $3,000, and can be as high as $6,000 • Commercial, non-profit and industrial installations receive incentives ranging from $1,500 per kilowatt, up to $10,000 • Multi-unit residential buildings operated by a non-profit may receive up to $4,500 per kilowatt, up to a maximum of $30,000 • Incentives will be awarded on a first-come-first-served basis until the incentive budget is exhausted • Priority Permitting • San Francisco currently offers priority permitting for building projects that meet or exceed LEED Gold standardswww.allenmatkins.com
  40. 40. SF Code: Possibility of superior performance incentives • Buildings that significantly exceed the baseline requirements might potentially receive incentives such as: – Development bonuses, such as additional building height – Priority permitting, providing expedited review of applications – Equalization of green assessment evaluations – Rebate or refunds of project fees for green projects exceeding requirementswww.allenmatkins.com

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